3d Printing system
5 views | +0 today
Follow
3d Printing system
The next big printing technology
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Walter Muzazaila
Scoop.it!

You can print that?! 5 TEDx Talks on the wonders of 3D printing

You can print that?! 5 TEDx Talks on the wonders of 3D printing | 3d Printing system | Scoop.it
It’s not hard to realize that 3D printing is a big deal. Articles about the technology pop up every day, telling stories of scientists printing human ears; pens that write in three dimensions; and...
Walter Muzazaila's insight:

Ben, W. (2013). "You can print that?! 5 TEDx Talks on the wonders of 3D printing". Tedx. Retrieved on March 14, 2013 from  http://blog.tedx.com/post/44881606201/you-can-print-that-5-tedx-talks-on-the-wonders-of-3d.

 

"3d printer is capable of  printing,  any material. That includes , plastics, ceramics, concrete, silver, gold all in 3 dimension". Retrieved from the reference above(6:38). The author made clear that the future of this technology is promising. This essay  will discuss  3d printing in depth and hopefully come up with a great conclusion about its future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Walter Muzazaila
Scoop.it!

Practical 3D Printers

Practical 3D Printers | 3d Printing system | Scoop.it
So what is a 3D printer? It's a device you can either buy or build to make parts, toys, art, and even 3D images captured by a sensor or modeled in software.

 

Extracted directly from the book's abstract.

Walter Muzazaila's insight:

Brian, E.(August  29, 2012).The Science and Art of 3D Printing.Practical 3D Printers.

 

"3d printer will revolutionize our world" (xxiii). Retrieved from the reference above. This quote stated by author will be the base of this essay topic, as it clearly states the power of the 3d printing technology in the future.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Walter Muzazaila
Scoop.it!

Patent EP2486547A1 - Method and system enabling 3d printing of three-dimensional object models

Patent EP2486547A1 - Method and system enabling 3d printing of three-dimensional object models | 3d Printing system | Scoop.it
A method for generating a representation of an architectural structure which is printable by a 3D printer, the method comprising providing an architectural model, including polyhedrons, of an architectural structure; Minkowski summing at least one...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Walter Muzazaila from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

3D-Printed Skull Implant Ready for Operation

3D-Printed Skull Implant Ready for Operation | 3d Printing system | Scoop.it

3D printing technology has helped replace 75 percent of a patient's skull with the approval of U.S. regulators. The 3D-printed implant can replace the bone in people's skulls damaged by disease or trauma, according to Oxford Performance Materials. The company announced it had received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its skull implant on Feb. 18, 2013— a decision that led to the first U.S. surgical operation on March 4.

"We see no part of the orthopedic industry being untouched by this," said Scott DeFelice, president of Oxford Performance Materials.

DeFelice's company is already selling 3D-printed implants overseas as a contract manufacturer. But the FDA decision has opened the door for U.S. operations using the implants. [Video: A 3D Printer of Your Own]

3D printing's advantage comes from taking the digitally scanned model of a patient's skull and "printing" out a matching 3D object layer by layer. The precise manufacturing technique can even make tiny surface or edge details on the replacement part that encourage the growth of cells and allow bone to attach more easily.

 

About 300 to 500 U.S. patients could use skull bone replacements every month, according to DeFelice. The possible patients include people with cancerous bone in their skulls, as well as car accident victims and U.S. military members suffering from head trauma.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 16, 2013 3:36 AM

What are the implications?  For 3-D printing, it seems vast. ~ Deb