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Chris Anderson on the Democratisation of Manufacturing, Design and Technology

http://intelligencesquared.com/events/chris-anderson This talk took place on Wednesday 19th September at the Royal Institution of Great Britain, London.

 

Event Info:

Making things for most of us means baking cakes or tinkering in the garden shed. Chris Anderson, renowned technology expert, American author of the bestsellers The Long Tail and Free and Editor-in-Chief of Wired magazine, came to Intelligence Squared to herald the third industrial revolution, in which high-tech do-it-yourself will become a part of everyday life. No longer will every aspiring entrepreneur need the support of a major manufacturer to realise their dreams. We'll be living in a world, predicts Anderson, where technologies such as 3-D printing and electronics assembly will be available to everybody and where anybody with a smart idea and a little expertise will be able to make their ideas a reality.

 

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3D Printer Form 1 Gets 6X Its $100K Funding Goal On Kickstarter… In One Day | TechCrunch

3D Printer Form 1 Gets 6X Its $100K Funding Goal On Kickstarter… In One Day | TechCrunch | 3D printing - Mashup | Scoop.it
3D printing is coming into its own. No longer relegated to the professional sector, anyone who has the cash can essentially join in the fun with a Makerbot or a RepRap.

 

GOt the article yesterday !

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TCT Live - The Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Event - September 25/26, NEC, UK

TCT Live - The Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Event - September 25/26, NEC, UK | 3D printing - Mashup | Scoop.it
The Event for Additive Manufacturing, 3D Printing and Product Development Technologies...
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5 Questions with Formlabs: How a 3D Printer Could Change the World | Xconomy

5 Questions with Formlabs: How a 3D Printer Could Change the World | Xconomy | 3D printing - Mashup | Scoop.it

A stealthy tech startup in Cambridge, MA, is unveiling its product to the world today. Oh, and what its product does is build other products.

>>> There are around 30,000 professional 3D printers installed around the world, and around 10 million users of 3D CAD software. We’re targeting that disparity.

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Formlabs Creates a Low-Cost, Light-Based 3-D Printer | Wired Design | Wired.com

Formlabs Creates a Low-Cost, Light-Based 3-D Printer | Wired Design | Wired.com | 3D printing - Mashup | Scoop.it
Desktop 3-d printing has largely been the domain of extrusion-based machines like MakerBot's Replicator and DIY RepRap designs.
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3D Printing — Barriers to Adoption (Part 1) > ENGINEERING.com

Despite the benefits and amazing potential, 3D printing continues to struggle to achieve the wide-spread adoption that so many have predicted. Ra...
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Where Will 3-D Printing Be in 10 Years?

The Motley Fool - A look at the future of a transformative technology.
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Defense Distributed 3D printable gun

1) Create the world’s first 100% 3D printable gun GOAL: Develop a fully printable 3D gun

Our initial Wiki Weapon (A) design has no moving parts and relies on a separate, inserted solenoid to fire. We begin with this design to learn from the ABS material itself, but this is a method of trial and error. At $5 per cubic inch, we are at the point where we need outside funds to produce and complete a proof gun. The result of the lessons we learn from WikiWep A will instruct the design and development of Wiki Weapon B, a fully-printable gun comprised of near 100% printable parts.

What We Need & What You Get

DefDist needs $20,000 to get this project off the ground.

$9,900 will purchase a Stratasys “Mojo” brand FDM printer and sofware package. ABSplus material, cleaning solutions, (some) software licenses, and consultations with engineers and developers. ABSplus polymer is essentially $5 per cubic inch for any given build. Multiple production runs will quickly become expensive. The Impact

This project could very well change the way we think about gun control and consumption. How do governments behave if they must one day operate on the assumption that any and every citizen has near instant access to a firearm through the Internet? Let’s find out.

Every dollar contributed to this project is also a vote to export the protections of the Second Amendment to the entire world. Libertas.

2) Adapt the design down to cheaper 3D printers Goal: Adapt the design so it can be printed on less expensive 3D printers-without compromising safety.

These guns will be almost completely plastic, so melting and failing in your hand will be a concern. Only after testing a few dozen designs to failure will we discover the right limitations to be comfortable rating a WikiWep as safe for one use. Basically we need to break some guns. This is the seed money for the second phase of development. We want to minimize negative media about the safety concerns of untested firearms and the inevitable suggestions that governments should protect us from ourselves.

What We Need & What You Get

DefDist needs $ to port the design to the inexpensive RepRap or Makerbot 3D printer.

$7,000 to produce 50-100 revisions and test them to failure. $3,000 in consultations with engineers and developers.(we have low costs thanks to many volunteers) The Impact

DefDist will build and design a 100% 3D printable gun for the purpose of porting to a RepRap printer. The result will be an easily accessible and replicable design shared with the world. At this point, any person has near-instant access to a firearm through the internet.

3) Become The Web’s Printable Gun Wiki Redoubt Goal: Further embrace the “Wiki” root of the project and establish a printable gunsmithing commons.

Instead of hacking off central planners directly, why not ignore them into irrelevance? In response to our project’s feedback and instincts, we open up this site to the world to share and participate in the creation and distribution of knowledge relevant to advancing 3D printable weapons.

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Infographic: What is 3D printing? - 3D Printing

Infographic: What is 3D printing? - 3D Printing | 3D printing - Mashup | Scoop.it
If you don't know exactly how 3D printing came to exist and what it currently has to offer, take a look at this great infographic made by Sculpteo.
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3D Printing Question of the Week: Should libraries provide 3D printing?

3D Printing Question of the Week: Should libraries provide 3D printing? | 3D printing - Mashup | Scoop.it
On 3D Printing is covering a seemingly heated debate among librarians over whether to bring 3D printing to the masses through libraries.

Via Elisa Vivancos
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Continuum Fashion

Continuum Fashion | 3D printing - Mashup | Scoop.it
Continuum is part fashion label, part experimental design lab. Founded by Mary Huang and Jenna Fizel, Continuum seeks to define the future of fashion.
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3D Printing — Barriers to Adoption (Part 2) > ENGINEERING.com

Part two of guest blogger Rachel Park's series on barriers to 3D printer adoption addresses that long-standing issues of material properties, accuracy...
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Laywood filament lets you 3D print with wood | Geek.com

Laywood filament lets you 3D print with wood | Geek.com | 3D printing - Mashup | Scoop.it
Sep. 21, 2012 - 3D printing technology continues to take leaps forward. The latest development is a new filament that uses wood as its primary ingredient.
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I'm new to scoop.it, changes may'will come

twitter : @lotrmilion

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The Death of Manufacturing Is Coming … Eventually (DDD)

The Motley Fool - 3D printing could transform the world, but how long will it take?

 

Continual improvements in 3D printing have made it increasingly apparent that the future of manufacturing may bear little resemblance to its past. However, the particular shape of that future is still being formed. I've already covered 3D Systems (NYSE: DDD  ) and its push for widespread consumer adoption. Another business model is already in place today: companies with know-how and a high-end printer, selling customized widgets.

Both could be tremendously successful, but neither has fully caught on with the masses. The technology hasn't yet reached a tipping point towards broader adoption. How much better does 3D printing need to be to transform manufacturing as we know it?

 

Ch-ch-ch-changes
Like many other technology platforms, 3D printers have undergone incredible improvements over the past decade. To find out just how much has changed, I decided to compare the best Stratasys (Nasdaq: SSYS  ) model of a decade ago to the 3D Systems Cube, the first machine marketed towards neophytes:

 

Stratasys Maxum

3D Systems Cube

Introduced November 2000 January 2012 Cost $312,600* $1,299 Accuracy 0.127 mm 0.125 mm Max Print Size 600 x 500 x 600 mm 140 x 140 x 140 mm Machine Size 6.5 feet tall, 2500 pounds Desktop size, nine pounds

Sources: Archived Stratasys website (Wayback Machine) and Cubify.com. * Cost adjusted for inflation.


The Cube manages to keep accuracy on par with the best machine of 2002 while costing just 1/240 the price. Stratasys' top model today costs $380,000, but its accuracy tops out at 0.089 mm, just less than twice as precise as the Cube. Its major advantage is its large capacity and the ability to use multiple materials, areas where the Cube is limited. This isn't trivial: Multi-material capabilities will be essential to broader adoption, and a cubic working area less than six inches to a side significantly restricts what can be made.

How might adoption take place, and what will it take to get there? Let's look at both scenarios.

 

A 3D printer in every home?
Unless you're one of the resourcefully technical sorts with a lot of experience in 3D modeling, you probably aren't even sure what you'd do with a new 3D printer. 3D Systems hopes to overcome that barrier with ease-of-use apps and premade designs on Cubify.com, companion site to the Cube. Microsoft's (Nasdaq: MSFT  ) Kinect provides one way to simplify things, but it may not be enough by itself to initiate the widespread adoption of in-home 3D printing.

You don't need design talent to print to paper. Most flat printing is straightforward, like copying that chowder recipe off the Internet, or tweaking your newest resume. But step into a 3D design program and things can get complicated quickly. A Kinect and ease-of-use apps can lower the entry barriers, but the creative and technical skills to make full use of the medium remain beyond the reach of many.

 

No "killer app"
Even leaving off the extra complexity, why would most people even need a 3D printer in their home? I walked through my house to find something would make more sense to  print in 3D than to buy, but came up with nothing. I can't print clothes. I don't need new cups and bowls every month. I certainly don't need cheap plastic dinnerware when I can buy a perfectly nice ceramic set for the cost of a single Cube 3D print cartridge.

MakerBot Industries, a low-cost 3-D printer startup, notes that you can “make shower curtain rings, bath plugs, [and] door knobs” with its printer. Seriously. Because nothing justifies the purchase of a $1,750 toy like making your own bath plugs.

But what if I decide that I want unique flooring that can't be found at Home Depot (NYSE: HD  ) ? Now we're getting somewhere.

 

Make it on the spot at a different spot
Most may not need to make their own stuff more than once or twice a year. But offer the chance to put a unique spin on basic objects made of plastic, glass, metal, ceramic, and even chocolate, and millions will line up over that same time frame. Private companies like Shapeways already offer outsourced -D printing services, a model 3D Systems is moving toward with Cubify.com.

Printing in 3D is good enough today to create hearing aids and replacement joints for delicate humans. There's no reason the technology can't take a prominent place in home improvement warehouses to, say, print customized flooring or ensure there are enough snow shovels before a blizzard. The only restrictions are material cost and printable size. Instead of shrinking, 3D printers should be getting bigger and more efficient. A six-foot tall printer should be able to craft something that's not much smaller than its own footprint.

 

If you build it
Home Depot and Lowe's (NYSE: LOW  ) already seem ideally suited for 3D printing. Many things handy folks need are simply made and have straightforward designs, so they're easily customized or otherwise replicated on site. There will be plenty of other ways to bring 3D printing to retail environments, especially once multiple materials can be easily manipulated within the same object. I'd give Stratasys the advantage in the retail space, as that company seems more focused on the bleeding edge of quality.

I'm not the only one advocating scaled-up 3D printing, either. Several teams have been working on construction-scale printing contraptions in recent years, with the hopes that they will eventually create entire buildings. One even aims to print buildings on the moon. If 3D printing can go into space, why not into the mall? It's a lot closer, and probably a good deal more profitable. The machines seem to be capable of necessary scale and precision and have by now successfully utilized a broad range of materials. The larger obstacles are strategy and software, and there's no reason both can't be updated.

When 3-D printing manufacturers figure out how to crack the retail market, they'll make previous growth rates seem puny. But you don't have to wait to find companies that are changing the world and making money at the same time. Check out our brand new free report, "Discover the Next Rule-Breaking Multibagger." This company is behind a medical transformation helping doctors improve the lives of thousands. Enhance the growth prospects for your portfolio by downloading your free copy today.

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