21st Century Literacy and Learning
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21st Century Literacy and Learning
Information related to learning in the 21st Century
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Ten Reflective Questions to Ask at the End of Class

Ten Reflective Questions to Ask at the End of Class | 21st Century Literacy and Learning | Scoop.it
Use these ten reflective questions at the end of class to help learners deepen their understandings of themselves and their work.

Via Beth Dichter, Ariana Amorim
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MARÍA JOSEFINA AGUILAR LEO's curator insight, March 19, 2015 2:10 PM

añada su visión ...

Richard Varey's curator insight, March 20, 2015 2:15 AM

L

Mary Cunningham's curator insight, April 4, 2015 12:35 PM

These would be great questions for the end of any and all PD sessions we do!

Maybe they should take the place of the surveys we usually do?

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Study: You Really Can 'Work Smarter, Not Harder'

Study: You Really Can 'Work Smarter, Not Harder' | 21st Century Literacy and Learning | Scoop.it
Research shows that reflecting after learning something new makes it stick in your brain.

Via Sharrock, Ivon Prefontaine, Cindy Riley Klages
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Sharrock's curator insight, July 30, 2014 12:28 PM

excerpt:

"Learning is more effective if a lesson or experience is deliberately coupled with time spent thinking about what was just presented, a new study shows. In “Learning by Thinking: How Reflection Aids Performance,” a team of researchers from HEC Paris, Harvard Business School, and the University of North Carolina describe what they call the first empirical test of the effect of reflection on learning. By “reflection,” they mean taking time after a lesson to synthesize, abstract, or articulate the important points."

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 30, 2014 9:06 PM

An important aspect of reflecting and learning is getting beyond what went well and, even when we think we have succeeded, look for the things that were different about this learning.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, July 31, 2014 11:46 PM

Reflection is crucial.  If we don't take time to reflect, we don't take time to improve.

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Robert Fisher Teaching Thinking homepage

This article explores what metacognition is, why it is important and how it develops in children. It argues that teachers need to help children develop metacognitive awareness, and identifies the factors which enhance metacognitive development. Metacognitive thinking is a key element in the transfer of learning. The child's development of metacognitive skills is defined as meta-learning. Meta-teaching strategies can help mediate the metacognitive skills of children, help to stimilate children's metacognitive thinking. The article draws upon reserch currently being undertaken in London schools on raising achievement in thinking and learning through developing the metacognition of children as learners in schools.

 


Via Sharrock, The Rice Process, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Sharrock's curator insight, January 28, 2014 8:33 AM

excerpt: "Brown claims that two versions of metacognition are often confused, namely 'the essential distinction between self regulation during learning' and 'knowledge of, or even mental experimentation with, one's own thoughts' (Brown et al 1983). Adey & Shayer (1994) agree with this distinction, which they categorise as going beyond, and going above, the present learning behaviour. Going beyond one's present repertoire of reasoning is linked to 2,3 and 4 in Brown's list above. This can be equated with what Newman et al (1989) call 'construction zone activity', a concept derived from Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development, which refers to mental activity, usually of a collaborative nature, which involves children going beyond their present levels of competence. 

 
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Study: You Really Can 'Work Smarter, Not Harder' - The Atlantic

Study: You Really Can 'Work Smarter, Not Harder' - The Atlantic | 21st Century Literacy and Learning | Scoop.it
Research shows that reflecting after learning something new makes it stick in your brain.

Via John Evans, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Suvi Salo, Mikko Hakala
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Mikko Hakala's curator insight, May 17, 2014 2:47 PM

Reflection on learning is beneficial, says this article based on empirical tests. Reflection here means "taking time after a lesson to synthesize, abstract, or articulate the important points".

 

Teaching or sharing the new knowledge with someone else was also tested and found to give the same benefit.