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A New Role for Avatars: Learning Languages

A New Role for Avatars: Learning Languages | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
Most experts agree that the best way to learn a language is by immersing yourself in it. Now, with  more sophisticated technology, another theory around lang
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How to make music on your iPad: The best synths, drum machines and more

How to make music on your iPad: The best synths, drum machines and more | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
“ Make Musicis FACT’s new section devoted to making music anywhere, whether you’re a seasoned producer or a total novice, using an arsenal of analog gear or just your iPhone. From drum machine apps to powerful sequencers, the iPad is a Swiss Army knife for producers. In this guide, Scott Wilson collects the best apps for beginners and pros alike.”
Via John Evans
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Making Math Meaningful with Virtual Math Manipulatives via @coolcatteacher

Making Math Meaningful with Virtual Math Manipulatives via @coolcatteacher | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
“Use the real world to teach without the mess of physical manipulatives. In brief, virtual math manipulatives are powerful tools for math teachers everywhere. On the whole, many teachers don’t understand how to use them. So, today, you’ll get a simple tour of virtual math manipulatives from expert David Wees. In light of the fact that NCTM […]”
Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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How Can Your Librarian Help Bolster Brain-Based Teaching Practices?

How Can Your Librarian Help Bolster Brain-Based Teaching Practices? | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
Librarians may be a teacher's best resource when it comes to implementing inquiry-based teaching strategies.
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42 STEM iPad Apps for Kids (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) - Imagination Soup

42 STEM iPad Apps for Kids (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) - Imagination Soup | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
“ Ready for the best STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) apps for kids? Just remember that most ipad apps, with a few exceptions, won’t instruct your child. They will however, give him or her practice, repetition, and reinforcement.”
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Google Classroom: Video Playlists - Teacher Tech

Google Classroom: Video Playlists - Teacher Tech | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
Google Classroom Video Playlists are possible by creating a second Google Classroom for housing videos. Use the copy link to link to the video resource.
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What Project-Based Learning Is — and What It Isn’t

What Project-Based Learning Is — and What It Isn’t | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
Screenshot/High Tech High The term "project-based learning" gets tossed around a lot in discussions about how to connect students to what they're learning.
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Educational Alternatives to Pokémon Go ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Educational Alternatives to Pokémon Go ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it

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30 Innovative Ways to Use Twitter In the Classroom | Edudemic

30 Innovative Ways to Use Twitter In the Classroom | Edudemic | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
Do you use Twitter in your classroom as part of your lesson plans? If not, don’t worry—you’re not alone.
Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Lynnette Van Dyke
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The Rumors are True! There's a New Google Sites Coming! | Shake Up Learning

The Rumors are True! There's a New Google Sites Coming! | Shake Up Learning | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
  Pinterest The NEW Google Sites Yes! It’s true. There is FINALLY a new version of Google Sites coming. We’ve heard rumors of this elusive update for the last couple years, but now we have proof that it is a reality and will be in our hands sometime over the next year. If you have ever …

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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A New Infographic on Project-based Learning for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

A New Infographic on Project-based Learning for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it

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Why I Still Believe in the iPad’s Positive Impact on Classrooms

Why I Still Believe in the iPad’s Positive Impact on Classrooms | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
“ Back in 2013, approximately 60% of Maine's participating districts chose iPads. Now, as has been reported, a number of districts have opted to move back to laptops from iPads. Why?Way back in 2002, when Friendster was the biggest social network and people were gathering in Internet cafes, the State”
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Apple's new Swift Playgrounds for iPad is a killer app for teaching code

Apple's new Swift Playgrounds for iPad is a killer app for teaching code | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
At WWDC, Apple introduced Swift Playgrounds as a "revolutionary new app for iPad that makes learning Swift interactive and fun." A closer examination shows the new app is a powerful authoring tool any developer can use to teach critically important software coding skills.
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Minecraft Education Goes FREE

Minecraft Education Goes FREE | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
Take advantage of this quick bargain as Microsoft gives Minecraft Education away to districts for free! Now your students can gamify their learning.
Via Yashy Tohsaku, giovanni nulli, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Here Is A Good Source of Interactive Games and Experiments for Science Teachers

Here Is A Good Source of Interactive Games and Experiments for Science Teachers | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
“ The Lawrence Hall of Science is a great educational website from University of California, Berkeley. It provides a wide variety of resources to engage kids and students in learning science. It also offers ‘a comprehensive set of programs to help increase the quality and quantity of great science learning that kids get both in and out of school.’ As a teacher, you can use The Lawrence Hall of Science to look for activities and experiments to enrich your lesson plans. Use the tabs on the top of the website to easily browse through the materials it has.”
Via John Evans
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maralma's curator insight, September 18, 8:56 AM
Awesome!
Miguel Angel Perez Alvarez's curator insight, September 23, 11:33 AM
Desarrollar modelos y programar simuladores así como usarlos de manera heurística es una buena forma de mediar la construcción de representaciones científicas y de aprender ciencias
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Delta Flight 15 - A 9-11 Story

Flight Attendant shares story about the town of Gander Newfoundland who played host to thousands of airline passengers stranded there after 9/11.
Darlene Clapham K12's insight:
I read this story and thought to myself, what a great story to share with others. Think of all the Critical Thinking, Collaboration, Citizenship, Creativity & Innovation, Communication and Character that the citizens of Newfoundland demonstrated on that horrific September 11th day. The passengers of Delta Flight 15 are now demonstrating the same traits years and years later. Delta Flight 15 -> Thanks for making the difference for those students!

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From a flight attendant on Delta Flight 15, written following 9-11: On the morning of Tuesday, September 11, we were about 5 hours out of Frankfurt, flying over the North Atlantic. All of a sudden the curtains parted and I was told to go to the cockpit, immediately, to see the captain. As soon as I got there I noticed that the crew had that “All Business” look on their faces. The captain handed me a printed message. It was from Delta’s main office in Atlanta and simply read, “All airways over the Continental United States are closed to commercial air traffic. Land ASAP at the nearest airport. Advise your destination.” No one said a word about what this could mean. We knew it was a serious situation and we needed to find terra firma quickly. The captain determined that the nearest airport was 400 miles behind us in Gander, Newfoundland. He requested approval for a route change from the Canadian traffic controller and approval was granted immediately — no questions asked. We found out later, of course, why there was no hesitation in approving our request. While the flight crew prepared the airplane for landing, another message arrived from Atlanta telling us about some terrorist activity in the New York area. A few minutes later word came in about the hijackings. 

 We decided to LIE to the passengers while we were still in the air. We told them the plane had a simple instrument problem and that we needed to land at the nearest airport in Gander, Newfoundland, to have it checked out. We promised to give more information after landing in Gander. There was much grumbling among the passengers, but that’s nothing new! Forty minutes later, we landed in Gander. Local time at Gander was 12:30 PM …. that’s 11:00 AM EST. There were already about 20 other airplanes on the ground from all over the world that had taken this detour on their way to the US. After we parked on the ramp, the captain made the following announcement: “Ladies and gentlemen, you must be wondering if all these airplanes around us have the same instrument problem as we have. The reality is that we are here for another reason.” Then he went on to explain the little bit we knew about the situation in the US. There were loud gasps and stares of disbelief. The captain informed passengers that Ground control in Gander told us to stay put. The Canadian Government was in charge of our situation and no one was allowed to get off the aircraft. No one on the ground was allowed to come near any of the air crafts. Only airport police would come around periodically, look us over and go on to the next airplane. In the next hour or so more planes landed and Gander ended up with 53 airplanes from all over the world, 27 of which were US commercial jets. Meanwhile, bits of news started to come in over the aircraft radio and for the first time we learned that airplanes were flown into the World Trade Center in New York and into the Pentagon in DC. People were trying to use their cell phones, but were unable to connect due to a different cell system in Canada . Some did get through, but were only able to get to the Canadian operator who would tell them that the lines to the U.S. were either blocked or jammed. Sometime in the evening the news filtered to us that the World Trade Center buildings had collapsed and that a fourth hijacking had resulted in a crash. By now the passengers were emotionally and physically exhausted, not to mention frightened, but everyone stayed amazingly calm. We had only to look out the window at the 52 other stranded aircraft to realize that we were not the only ones in this predicament. We had been told earlier that they would be allowing people off the planes one plane at a time. At 6 PM, Gander airport told us that our turn to deplane would be 11 am the next morning. Passengers were not happy, but they simply resigned themselves to this news without much noise and started to prepare themselves to spend the night on the airplane. Gander had promised us medical attention, if needed, water, and lavatory servicing. And they were true to their word. Fortunately we had no medical situations to worry about. We did have a young lady who was 33 weeks into her pregnancy. We took REALLY good care of her. The night passed without incident despite the uncomfortable sleeping arrangements. About 10:30 on the morning of the 12th a convoy of school buses showed up. 

We got off the plane and were taken to the terminal where we went through Immigration and Customs and then had to register with the Red Cross. After that we (the crew) were separated from the passengers and were taken in vans to a small hotel. We had no idea where our passengers were going. We learned from the Red Cross that the town of Gander has a population of 10,400 people and they had about 10,500 passengers to take care of from all the airplanes that were forced into Gander! We were told to just relax at the hotel and we would be contacted when the US airports opened again, but not to expect that call for a while. We found out the total scope of the terror back home only after getting to our hotel and turning on the TV, 24 hours after it all started. Meanwhile, we had lots of time on our hands and found that the people of Gander were extremely friendly. They started calling us the “plane people.” We enjoyed their hospitality, explored the town of Gander and ended up having a pretty good time. Two days later, we got that call and were taken back to the Gander airport. Back on the plane, we were reunited with the passengers and found out what they had been doing for the past two days. What we found out was incredible….. Gander and all the surrounding communities (within about a 75 Kilometer radius) had closed all high schools, meeting halls, lodges, and any other large gathering places. They converted all these facilities to mass lodging areas for all the stranded travelers. Some had cots set up, some had mats with sleeping bags and pillows set up. ALL the high school students were required to volunteer their time to take care of the “guests.” Our 218 passengers ended up in a town called Lewisporte, about 45 kilometers from Gander where they were put up in a high school. If any women wanted to be in a women-only facility, that was arranged. Families were kept together. All the elderly passengers were taken to private homes. Remember that young pregnant lady? She was put up in a private home right across the street from a 24-hour Urgent Care facility. There was a dentist on call and both male and female nurses remained with the crowd for the duration. Phone calls and e-mails to the U.S. and around the world were available to everyone once a day. During the day, passengers were offered “Excursion” trips. Some people went on boat cruises of the lakes and harbors. Some went for hikes in the local forests. Local bakeries stayed open to make fresh bread for the guests. Food was prepared by all the residents and brought to the schools. People were driven to restaurants of their choice and offered wonderful meals. Everyone was given tokens for local laundry mats to wash their clothes, since luggage was still on the aircraft. In other words, every single need was met for those stranded travelers.

Passengers were crying while telling us these stories. Finally, when they were told that U.S. airports had reopened, they were delivered to the airport right on time and without a single passenger missing or late. The local Red Cross had all the information about the whereabouts of each and every passenger and knew which plane they needed to be on and when all the planes were leaving. They coordinated everything beautifully. It was absolutely incredible. When passengers came on board, it was like they had been on a cruise. Everyone knew each other by name. They were swapping stories of their stay, impressing each other with who had the better time. Our flight back to Atlanta looked like a chartered party flight. The crew just stayed out of their way. It was mind-boggling. Passengers had totally bonded and were calling each other by their first names, exchanging phone numbers, addresses, and email addresses. And then a very unusual thing happened. One of our passengers approached me and asked if he could make an announcement over the PA system. We never, ever allow that. But this time was different. I said “of course” and handed him the mike. He picked up the PA and reminded everyone about what they had just gone through in the last few days. He reminded them of the hospitality they had received at the hands of total strangers. He continued by saying that he would like to do something in return for the good folks of Lewisporte. “He said he was going to set up a Trust Fund under the name of DELTA 15 (our flight number). The purpose of the trust fund is to provide college scholarships for the high school students of Lewisporte. He asked for donations of any amount from his fellow travelers. When the paper with donations got back to us with the amounts, names, phone numbers and addresses, the total was for more than $14,000! “The gentleman, a MD from Virginia , promised to match the donations and to start the administrative work on the scholarship. He also said that he would forward this proposal to Delta Corporate and ask them to donate as well. As I write this account, the trust fund is at more than $1.5 million and has assisted 134 students in college education.

 “I just wanted to share this story because we need good stories right now. It gives me a little bit of hope to know that some people in a faraway place were kind to some strangers who literally dropped in on them. It reminds me how much good there is in the world.” “In spite of all the rotten things we see going on in today’s world this story confirms that there are still a lot of good people in the world and when things get bad, they will come forward.

 ***A story for generations to hear!****
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8 digital skills we must teach our children

8 digital skills we must teach our children | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it

Digital intelligence or “DQ” is the set of social, emotional and cognitive abilities that enable individuals to face the challenges and adapt to the demands of digital life. These abilities can broadly be broken down into eight interconnected areas.


Via Nik Peachey, Vicki Moro, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Stephen Dale's curator insight, September 1, 7:06 AM
Digital skills - as important as speech in today's technology driven environment. 
Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, September 2, 5:20 PM
What a cool summary of the digital intelligence our students must be exposed to and acquire for success in life. Check it out!
Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, September 3, 8:55 AM
Well put together. An article to share with staff.
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New Technologies Nurture STEM Growth in the Classroom

New Technologies Nurture STEM Growth in the Classroom | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
STEM is top of mind among educators and parents for good reason.
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Reading, writing, arithmetic — and don't forget coding

Reading, writing, arithmetic — and don't forget coding | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
Teaching kids to code isn't just about preparing them for a changing workforce. In addition to reinforcing skills like math, science, and language, learning programming can be empowering, as students gain insight into how things work.

Learning code helps kids see the world algorithmically, in patterns, and in cause and effect. Ray Feraday, a special education teacher with the Toronto Catholic District School Board, says, "Coding is all about problem solving and critical thinking. You take what may be a large problem and systematically break it down into smaller, solvable parts. This technique develops confidence and self-reliance."

Teaching kids how the digital tools they use are made also makes them more critical thinkers.

Via John Evans
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A Kids' Guide to Canada - By Kids, For Kids ~~ Un Guide du Canada - Par Des Enfants, Pour Des Enfants

A Kids' Guide to Canada   -   By Kids, For Kids           ~~   Un Guide du Canada - Par Des Enfants, Pour Des Enfants | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
A Project to Celebrate Canada's 150th Birthday in 2017
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Lesson 1 - Explore Cultural Resourcess

Lesson 1 - Explore Cultural Resourcess | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
Darlene Clapham K12's insight:
Google has updated/enhanced their training centre. Have a look at what is available for educators. "
Learning never stops
Dedicated educators are lifelong learners. With that in mind, we've designed free, online training for the classroom that helps educators do what they do best, even better". Get certified or just have fun learning!
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Five Things Education Technology Could Learn from Pokémon Go

Five Things Education Technology Could Learn from Pokémon Go | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it

Whether you are a technologist working on the next great learning app or a teacher trying to figure out how to engage your students, Pokémon Go offers a powerful model that has quickly changed the way users behave and engage with digital content.


Via Nik Peachey
Darlene Clapham K12's insight:

A must read for anyone designing elearning.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 18, 1:59 AM

A must read for anyone designing elearning.

Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, July 18, 2:21 AM
This article discusses how educators can learn from the new Pokemon Go game. A really interesting read. 
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Free Technology for Teachers: Two Easy Ways to Add Accent Marks in Google Documents

Free Technology for Teachers: Two Easy Ways to Add Accent Marks in Google Documents | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
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Librarian Approved: 30 Ed-Tech Apps to Inspire Creativity and Creation

Librarian Approved: 30 Ed-Tech Apps to Inspire Creativity and Creation | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
A group of tech-savvy librarians offer up a list of their favorite education apps this year.
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Getting Started with Quizzes in Google Forms

Getting Started with Quizzes in Google Forms | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
At ISTE this past week (2016 in Denver), Google announced the ability to create self-grading quizzes in Google Forms. This was a welcomed surprise to the Google Apps-using education world and inclu…
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5 ways to engage students in real coding this summer (hint: it’s not by playing Minecraft)

5 ways to engage students in real coding this summer (hint: it’s not by playing Minecraft) | 21st Century Learning | Scoop.it
Teach students coding that goes way beyond drag and drop.
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