21st Century Leadership
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7 Things Smart Learners Do Differently

7 Things Smart Learners Do Differently | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

What makes a real difference in reaching your potential is an ability to be a smart learner. See what smart learners do differently and what they can teach us.


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 22, 2014 6:14 PM

They do all those things and probably many more.

donhornsby's curator insight, February 22, 2014 10:58 PM

(From the article): People often divide their time between learning and non-learning. Learning is usually much more focused, dedicated time. Even our education systems are built around that concept — first we learn for several years, and then we work. Smart learners do it differently. They use every occasion to learn something new — about the food they eat, the way things work, different cultures, different roles in the same organization, history, and the people around them. The world is a great source of knowledge and skills, available 24/7, so they ask tons of questions and connect the dots.

Don Cloud's curator insight, March 2, 2014 9:36 AM

Learning is a journey, not a destination.

21st Century Leadership
Leadership and Encouragement for the 21st Century
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Why Smart People Don't Multitask - Multitasking Lowers IQ, Impairs Cognitive Processing

Why Smart People Don't Multitask - Multitasking Lowers IQ, Impairs Cognitive Processing | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
You may have heard that multitasking is bad for you, but new studies show that it kills your performance and may even damage your brain. Every time you multitask you aren't just harming your performance in the moment; you may very well be damaging an area of your brain that's critical to your future success at work.

Research conducted at Stanford University found that multitasking is less productive than doing a single thing at a time. The researchers found that people who are regularly bombarded with several streams of electronic information cannot pay attention, recall information, or switch from one job to another as well as those who complete one task at a time.

A Special Skill?

But what if some people have a special gift for multitasking? The Stanford researchers compared groups of people based on their tendency to multitask and their belief that it helps their performance. They found that heavy multitaskers—those who multitask a lot and feel that it boosts their performance—were actually worse at multitasking than those who like to do a single thing at a time. The frequent multitaskers performed worse because they had more trouble organizing their thoughts and filtering out irrelevant information, and they were slower at switching from one task to another.

Via iPamba, Ivon Prefontaine
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 29, 2016 4:24 PM
It takes time to refocus, so the supposed efficiencies are eliminated. As well, we do not attend to the people in front of us and the tasks at hand.
Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Want to Be a Good Boss? Start by Understanding Why You Want to Lead

Want to Be a Good Boss? Start by Understanding Why You Want to Lead | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
“ Research explores the pros and cons of two distinct leadership styles.”
Via Brad Parcells, Aperio Coaching & Consulting, LLC, Vicki Moro, Ivon Prefontaine
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 22, 2016 4:17 PM
It is a bit of an oversimiplication to thin there are only two forms of leadership. Maybe that is why people vote the way they do? Where does servant leadership fit?
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Why Smart People Don't Multitask - Multitasking Lowers IQ, Impairs Cognitive Processing

Why Smart People Don't Multitask - Multitasking Lowers IQ, Impairs Cognitive Processing | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
You may have heard that multitasking is bad for you, but new studies show that it kills your performance and may even damage your brain. Every time you multitask you aren't just harming your performance in the moment; you may very well be damaging an area of your brain that's critical to your future success at work.

Research conducted at Stanford University found that multitasking is less productive than doing a single thing at a time. The researchers found that people who are regularly bombarded with several streams of electronic information cannot pay attention, recall information, or switch from one job to another as well as those who complete one task at a time.

A Special Skill?

But what if some people have a special gift for multitasking? The Stanford researchers compared groups of people based on their tendency to multitask and their belief that it helps their performance. They found that heavy multitaskers—those who multitask a lot and feel that it boosts their performance—were actually worse at multitasking than those who like to do a single thing at a time. The frequent multitaskers performed worse because they had more trouble organizing their thoughts and filtering out irrelevant information, and they were slower at switching from one task to another.

Via iPamba, Ivon Prefontaine
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 29, 2016 4:24 PM
It takes time to refocus, so the supposed efficiencies are eliminated. As well, we do not attend to the people in front of us and the tasks at hand.
Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from The Daily Leadership Scoop
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10 Simple Concepts to Become a Better Leader

10 Simple Concepts to Become a Better Leader | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Learn How to Start a Blog for Free or WordPress and Make Money. How to Promote Blog, Social Media Marketing & SEO. How to become an entrepreneurs.

Via Anne Leong, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Bobby Dillard
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donhornsby's curator insight, January 13, 10:58 AM
The world is more complex than ever before, and yet what customers often respond to best is simplicity — in design, form, and function. Taking complex projects, challenges, and ideas and distilling them to their simplest components allows customers, staff, and other stakeholders to better understand and buy into your vision. We humans all crave simplicity, and so today's leader must be focused and deliver simplicity.
 
Jerry Busone's curator insight, January 14, 8:04 AM

The concepts of Leading are rarely smile but number 10 is simplicity... enjoy

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How Great Leaders Hire The Right People

How Great Leaders Hire The Right People | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
 

"I look for someone with something to prove—to your old boss, your dad, your third-grade teacher, yourself. I don’t care where it comes from: You need that hustle." —Emily Weiss, founder and CEO, Glossier

 

"I ask, ‘Think of your worst day—what happens?’ You learn about people’s pet peeves, about what environment won’t work for them. Sometimes they disqualify themselves without realizing it, because they reveal they don’t really want the job." —Tom Ogletree, director of social impact, General Assembly


Via The Learning Factor, Yashy Tohsaku, Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, January 10, 4:49 PM

Here's what to look for in your next interview.

Gino Bondi's curator insight, January 11, 10:58 AM

Quick read on how to go "deep" with candidates

Jerry Busone's curator insight, Today, 8:01 AM

For me the number thing to hire right is motivational fit... a person can have all the crendtials but if they don't fit into the team, corporate culture thats a long term receive for disaster. While talented people can contribute in the short term , they might do it at the sacrifice of the good team around them. 

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7 Destructive Habits You Need to Eliminate From Your Daily Routine

7 Destructive Habits You Need to Eliminate From Your Daily Routine | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

The internet is chock full of daily habits that will help your routine, but what about bad habits? Because habits are so ingrained into our daily routines, we often don't notice how harmful ones sneak in and ruin our success.

 

Try eliminating the following habits from your life and see how your success in business and in life improve:


Via The Learning Factor, Roger Francis
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, December 18, 2016 4:44 PM

These common habits are a lot more damaging than you might believe.

Aar Aar's comment, December 20, 2016 11:29 PM
We are provider of alltype aluminium products like aluminium extrusion suppliers in delhi ncr, scaffolding supplier in Delhi, extruded aluminium profiles & supplier,industrial aluminium supplier hospital equipment supplier in Delhi
Aar Aar's comment, December 20, 2016 11:29 PM
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10 Simple Things That Teams Expect From Their Leader

10 Simple Things That Teams Expect From Their Leader | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
To build a great team, do these 10 simple things.
Via TechinBiz, Stewart-Marshall, Roger Francis
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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, December 22, 2016 3:11 PM

What do YOU expect from a leader?

 

JASON CAVNESS's curator insight, December 26, 2016 11:58 AM
10 Simple Things That Teams Expect From Their Leader
donhornsby's curator insight, December 27, 2016 10:21 AM
Leaders who meet all 10 of these expectations will have built a loyal, committed team that they can rely upon, a team that is engaged and will do its best to be successful.
 
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Stop Being Hard on Yourself: 12 Tips for Learning Life Lessons

Stop Being Hard on Yourself: 12 Tips for Learning Life Lessons | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
You need to recognize when you’re being hard on yourself so you can kill negative thinking.
How?
Are you comparing yourself to others? Are you hiding or repressing your anger? Are you trying to do everything alone without a support system?
Stop!
Below is an infographic with 12 simple and inspiring ideas from Anna Vital for how to stop being hard on yourself.

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, December 27, 2016 2:18 AM

Contemplation New Year resolutions? Consider dealing with your inner critic!

donhornsby's curator insight, December 27, 2016 10:14 AM
Surround yourself with people who want you to succeed. Having people you can trust and rely on will make you happier and feel better about yourself.
 
carmendsw's curator insight, December 29, 2016 12:47 PM
Reflecting on your performance, progress, failures in 2016? Here are some pointers on how to learn positively.
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20 Simple Things You Can Do Daily To Become A Mindful Person

20 Simple Things You Can Do Daily To Become A Mindful Person | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
The world we are living in today has taken away our ability to truly appreciate the little things that we should be thankful for.

Via Yashy Tohsaku, Ivon Prefontaine
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 20, 2016 6:55 PM
Thich Nhat Hanh reminds us that we can find the extraordinary in the ordinary when we stop and are present to the world.
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13 Leadership Skills You Didn't Need A Decade Ago That Are Now Essential

13 Leadership Skills You Didn't Need A Decade Ago That Are Now Essential | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Leadership skills aren't stagnant. Different generations moving in and out of the workforce dictate changes to the way people lead.

Via David Hain, Ron McIntyre, Bobby Dillard
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David Hain's curator insight, December 15, 2016 2:54 AM

Misleading headline, bathes trends have become more critical in recent times.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 16, 2016 3:51 PM
Leadership is always changing and transforming.
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Essentials for 1:1s - How to get your team to open up in your 1:1s

Essentials for 1:1s - How to get your team to open up in your 1:1s | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
1:1s are hard if your team doesn't open up. Using these 5 approaches you can improve your meetings so you have awesome 1:1s with all of your team.

Via Roger Francis
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15 Signs Your Employee Is Ready to Become a Manager

15 Signs Your Employee Is Ready to Become a Manager | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Promoting from within is good business, but which team members are actually manager-worthy?

Via Bobby Dillard
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70% of employees say they are disengaged at work. Here's how to motivate them

70% of employees say they are disengaged at work. Here's how to motivate them | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Before managers can start creating motivated, engaged employees, there are some critical things that they need to stop doing, writes Travis Bradberry.
Via Richard Andrews, Kudos, Bobby Dillard
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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, December 1, 2016 2:34 PM

We have been seeing articles like this for over 15 years.  Why are we still seeing them with no improvements?

Kudos's curator insight, December 3, 2016 7:16 PM
Good read. Start off the new year right. Always love it when people highlight Kudos as being core to success. The platinum rule is bang on. Kudos to you Dr. Travis Bradberry @talentsmarteq. 2017 is a brave new world, treat your people and culture right by following these rules if you want to have the engaged team that takes you to the success you want. And give them Kudos as a news years gift. 
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Leadership and Coaching Skills - People Development Network

Leadership and Coaching Skills - People Development Network | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Leaders are probably more familiar with mentoring - sharing and advising - as a skill rather than coaching. Coaching requires a different set of skills.

Via The People Development Network, Roger Francis, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Bobby Dillard
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The Akrasia Effect: Why We Don’t Follow Through on Things

The Akrasia Effect: Why We Don’t Follow Through on Things | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
The ancient Greek term "akrasia" helps explain why we don't follow through on things. Read this article to learn how akrasia works and what to do about it.

Via Bobby Dillard, Ivon Prefontaine
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 26, 2016 6:50 PM
Procrastination is not good, but it happens for good reasons. We think we have other important things to do.
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Why People Leave Managers, not Companies (+ what to do about it)

Why People Leave Managers, not Companies (+ what to do about it) | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
It's a familiar saying: "People leave managers, not companies," but is it true? We look at why people leave, and what managers & leaders can do about it.

Via Bobby Dillard
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 19, 4:01 PM
This is true. I left teaching, because of the people who did not understand what teaching was about in my classroom and with each student. I did not want it to become a job. I wanted to remember how much I desired being a teacher.
Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from The Daily Leadership Scoop
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Leadership and Coaching Skills - People Development Network

Leadership and Coaching Skills - People Development Network | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Leaders are probably more familiar with mentoring - sharing and advising - as a skill rather than coaching. Coaching requires a different set of skills.

Via The People Development Network, Roger Francis, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Bobby Dillard
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4 Questions To Help Leaders Define Their Brand

4 Questions To Help Leaders Define Their Brand | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Leaders who understand their personal brand can answer these four questions about their brand's value proposition – in just a few words.

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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Gino Bondi's curator insight, January 11, 4:27 PM

4 great questions for teachers and school leaders to ask of themselves - you are your own brand!

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Rohn: Why Successful Habits Breed Success

Rohn: Why Successful Habits Breed Success | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
When you are doing all that you can possibly do, and you are successful at reaching your expectations, keep doing it. Success is one of the best forms of motivation. Psychologists call this positive reinforcement. We all know about positive reinforcement. That’s how we train our dogs. That how we teach our kids.

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7 E's of High-Performance Leadership That You Need to Activate

7 E's of High-Performance Leadership That You Need to Activate | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Great leaders achieve inspired results by activating these seven areas.

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D., Roger Francis
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Don’t Replace People. Augment Them. – What’s The Future? 

Don’t Replace People. Augment Them. – What’s The Future?  | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
If we let machines put us out of work, it will be because of a failure of imagination and the will to make a better future!
“Could a machine do your job?” ask Michael Chui, James Manyika, and Mehdi Miremadi in a recent McKinsey Quarterly article, Where Machines Could Replace Humans and Where They Can’t Yet. The authors try to put the current worries about this question in perspective:
“As automation technologies such as machine learning and robotics play an increasingly great role in everyday life, their potential effect on the workplace has, unsurprisingly, become a major focus of research and public concern. The discussion tends toward a Manichean guessing game: which jobs will or won’t be replaced by machines?
In fact, as our research has begun to show, the story is more nuanced. While automation will eliminate very few occupations entirely in the next decade, it will affect portions of almost all jobs to a greater or lesser degree, depending on the type of work they entail.”
Instead of the binary question of which jobs will be eliminated, the authors instead wisely point out that it is tasks that are being automated, and that automation doesn’t simply destroy jobs. It changes them.
But they don’t go far enough in their analysis. They assess the potential for job change in terms of the technical feasibility of automating various activities, the economics of labor supply and demand, and whether the savings from automation will justify the cost. They also note that “A fourth factor to consider is the benefits beyond labor substitution, including higher levels of output, better quality, and fewer errors. These are often larger than those of reducing labor costs.”
But they don’t ask what, in my opinion, is the key question.
What will new technology let us do that was previously impossible?

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David Hain's curator insight, December 16, 2016 7:02 AM

Reframing robot wars! "What will new technology let us do that was previously impossible?" Great question from Tim O'Reilly!

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7 Ways to Leverage Your Power at Work

7 Ways to Leverage Your Power at Work | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Power is an interesting concept when leading and working within organizations. Power is not always just as it appears on the organizational chart! Just because someone’s box is higher up on the chart does not always mean that they have the most power.




Via David Hain, Kevin Watson, Bobby Dillard
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David Hain's curator insight, December 14, 2016 7:16 AM

If you don't manage upwards, you get the boss you deserve. Worthwhile having a think about power and how it applies to you?

donhornsby's curator insight, December 14, 2016 9:42 AM
(From the article): Focus on the future–let go of the past. People love getting ideas aimed at helping them achieve their goals for the future. They dislike being ‘proven wrong’ because of mistakes in the past. By focusing on the future, you can concentrate on what can be achieved tomorrow, as opposed to what was not achieved yesterday.
 
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How To Grow Leadership From Within Your Company

How To Grow Leadership From Within Your Company | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Jack Welch, former CEO of General Electric, may have retired 15 years ago, but his influence in corporate America still resonates. Not only is he known as one of the most successful industrial leaders of the 20th century—most notably increasing the value of GE by 4,000 percent—but he is also a great example of how a company can effectively grow powerful leaders from within their own ranks.

 

Welch, who graduated with a Ph.D. in chemical engineering, joined GE in 1960 as a junior chemical engineer. After a year with the company, Welch began seeking other jobs until a mentor in the company’s executive office recognized Welch’s talents and persuaded him to remain at the company. Just seven years later, Welch was appointed vice president of GE’s plastics division, and the climb up the corporate ladder continued. In 1981, Welch became GE’s youngest chairman and CEO.

 

As with GE and many other companies—Xerox, Harley-Davidson, Best Buy and McDonald’s— the next CEO of your company could very well be among your current employees. In fact, in a Forbes study of America’s 100 largest companies, 86 percent of CEOs were appointed from within company ranks. Your executive leadership most likely will be, too. Here are three ways to grow strong leadership from within your company.


Via The Learning Factor, Roger Francis
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, December 13, 2016 4:41 PM

The next CEO of your company may be residing within your company ranks. Here's how to grow strong future leaders from within.

Aar Aar's comment, December 20, 2016 11:31 PM
We are provider of alltype aluminium products like aluminium extrusion suppliers in delhi ncr, scaffolding supplier in Delhi, extruded aluminium profiles & supplier,industrial aluminium supplier hospital equipment supplier in Delhi
http://www.aaraarenterprises.in
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Building Rapport: The First Step to Being a Great Manager

Building Rapport: The First Step to Being a Great Manager | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Building rapport is often overlooked but is a critical part of succeeding as a leader. We share why rapport matters and how to build it with your team.

Via Bobby Dillard
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Forgiveness: The Least Understood Leadership Trait In The Workplace

Forgiveness: The Least Understood Leadership Trait In The Workplace | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Today, people think for themselves, especially in the entrepreneurial arena. Less really is more when it comes to building extraordinary organizations. Give people a dream that they can wrap their head and heart around, get out of the way, and let them run!

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D., Bobby Dillard
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Andy Webb's curator insight, December 5, 2016 7:22 PM
Poignant article that reminds us to be human to those we lead.
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 29, 2016 4:22 PM
It is the least understood of human traits. It is essential in each relationship we are in.