21st Century Leadership
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Kahneman on Well-Being and Domains of Consciousness

Kahneman on Well-Being and Domains of Consciousness | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
A Nobel Winning Psychologist

 

From the vantage point of the unified theory, there is much to like and only a little to critique regarding Kahneman's work. He is a brilliant experimentalist (I believe he is the only psychologist who has won a Nobel prize-let me know if you know of another) and his studies led to a whole field of behavioral (psychological?) economics. His work on the two mental systems, System 1 and System 2 and their corollaries in consciousness (experiential and reflective/remembering) is directly congruent with the model of cognition advocated for in the unified theory. (Behavioral Investment Theory provides the theoretical frame for System 1, and the Justification Hypothesis for System 2).

 


Via Sharrock, Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
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Sharrock's curator insight, December 19, 2013 10:10 AM

Kahneman's work indirectly suggests that educators can improve student approaches to problem solving and decision making and as a result improve resilience. If we can overcome some of the destructive habits of the mind on "cruise control", we may improve our outcomes.

 

from the article:

"Kahneman makes three key points in this talk (TEDtalk, where he explains how the two domains of human consciousness differ quite dramatically in what it means to be happy TEDx). The first point, which is somewhat subtle in that he only briefly alludes to it, is that happiness is a complicated construct and that there has been a shift away from this term, as it has been found not to capture the essence of what researchers are interested in. 

The second key point that Kahneman makes is that humans are of two minds, what he refers to in this talk as the experiencing and remembering selves. 

The third key point was how the experiencing self and the remembering self evaluate situations differently."

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, December 19, 2013 3:44 PM

Happiness is important to the way we live and our potential success.

21st Century Leadership
Leadership and Encouragement for the 21st Century
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The Brutal Truth About Why Being a Leader Is So Hard

Here's why leadership is so tough.
What makes this mentality so difficult is that, in every capacity, it asks that you, as a leader, put yourself last.

It's a removal of the ego. You can't just rage out of impatience, or get upset because other people aren't working the way you want them to work. You can't show your frustration--even if everyone else is. You can't sit back and complain when times get tough, you have to be the positive force that changes the tide.

You, as a leader, have to take a step back from your impulsive, emotional reactions, and instead operate from a place of calm understanding. And that's a skill that isn't taught in school, it's not taught in after-school clubs, or even on sports teams.

It's learned through watching closely others who embody that trait.

And it's learned through diligent self-inquiry, and constantly practicing the art of being flexible in the way you communicate and lead others.

Via Mel Riddile, Create Wise Leader
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Leading Effectively When You Inherit a Mess

Leading Effectively When You Inherit a Mess | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

An executive I work with recently stepped into the biggest challenge of her career. Recruited from outside the organization, she faced multiple problems: The business was losing money, costs were bloated, customer loyalty was fading, and key talent was defecting. Her predecessor had made a failed attempt at reorganizing before leaving for the competition. Morale was low, while distrust and anxiety were rising.

A 10-year longitudinal study on executive transitions that my organization conducted found that more than 50% of executives who inherit a mess fail within their first 18 months on the job. We also uncovered numerous landmines for leaders in this situation. And, with the best of intentions, my client was about to step on a number of them. When a leader inherits a mess created by others, especially when arriving as an outsider, the situation can feel fragile and knowing where to begin the long journey of change can feel precarious. Based on our research and my experience, there are six things the most effective leaders do to avoid failing in a new role.


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Five Reasons Most Companies Fail at Strategy Execution

Five Reasons Most Companies Fail at Strategy Execution | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
If your organisational culture has these five characteristics, all attempts to implement strategic change will likely be doomed. By Quy Huy, INSEAD Professor of Strategic Management It’s no longer a secret that most companies struggle with strategy execution. McKinsey research tells us, for example, that 70 percent of change efforts fall short [...]

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 12, 1:56 PM

This article is a little over one year old but much of the text is still part of the make up of many organizations. The last one: complacency is really a major factor with people and organizations.

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Rethinking the Bucket List: Kathleen Taylor at TEDxTampaBay

How would you live every day as if it were your last? Go skydiving? Attempt to ride a bull for 2.7 seconds? Kathleen Taylor has spent over 20 years as a counselor and community engagement facilitator for the dying and has found that in the last chapter of their lives, most people become their authentic selves. They become courageous - they change their minds, apologize, forgive... they find joy in the smallest moments. In this TEDx talk, Taylor urges us not to wait until we are at the end of our lives to find our true selves.


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How Sleep Can Make You a Stronger Leader

How Sleep Can Make You a Stronger Leader | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
If work keeps you up at night, read what our global sleep research shows about insomnia in high-performing leaders and what you can do about it.

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Dr. Wolfgang H. Mahr's curator insight, February 22, 3:54 AM

Organizational Resilience Starts Within You

Put all the frameworks and standards aside and think about who is powering these tools. You.

Have a look at this compact article helping you to become more resilient. In virtually all transportation industries, regulatory work/rest regulations are in effect. Why not take this as a role model?
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The Leader as Coach: 3 Times When Coaching Is Not the Answer

The Leader as Coach: 3 Times When Coaching Is Not the Answer | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

In a couple of my recent posts I’ve talked about managers using coach-like skills in their conversations with direct reports. Doing this often makes conversations more impactful and effective.

But there are times when using a coaching style is not appropriate—when, in fact, it can be counterproductive and cause the other person to become frustrated.


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The Brutal Truth About Why Being a Leader Is So Hard

Here's why leadership is so tough.
What makes this mentality so difficult is that, in every capacity, it asks that you, as a leader, put yourself last.

It's a removal of the ego. You can't just rage out of impatience, or get upset because other people aren't working the way you want them to work. You can't show your frustration--even if everyone else is. You can't sit back and complain when times get tough, you have to be the positive force that changes the tide.

You, as a leader, have to take a step back from your impulsive, emotional reactions, and instead operate from a place of calm understanding. And that's a skill that isn't taught in school, it's not taught in after-school clubs, or even on sports teams.

It's learned through watching closely others who embody that trait.

And it's learned through diligent self-inquiry, and constantly practicing the art of being flexible in the way you communicate and lead others.

Via Mel Riddile, Create Wise Leader
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Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Edgar Schein: Humble Leadership

Author and organizational culture expert Ed Schein in a conversation with Google VP of People Development Karen May.

 


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Gijs Spoor's curator insight, June 12, 2016 9:17 AM
In times of Great Churning asking humble questions allows collective intelligence to be activated. 
prepareexcitable's comment, August 19, 2016 1:14 AM
Its splendid :)
Barbara Kerr's curator insight, August 8, 11:25 AM
For the leader who seems to have everything . . .
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Don’t just sit there… | Henry Mintzberg

Don’t just sit there… | Henry Mintzberg | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

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Ian Berry's curator insight, May 4, 3:46 AM
Some great old ideas you can make new again
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 25, 1:27 PM
As a teacher, I found taking time to sit at tables and in circles without tables very beneficial to conversation.
Kelly Christopherson's curator insight, May 26, 2:07 PM
Shifting the scene - from taking to listening and the benefits at all levels of learning. 
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Awesome 1:1s: Bad advice about 1:1s to avoid (and what to do instead)

Awesome 1:1s: Bad advice about 1:1s to avoid (and what to do instead) | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
1:1s are an essential habits for great managers. Unfortunately, there's a lot of bad advice out there about them. We share the keys to great 1:1s.

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10 Best Boss Traits (Ranked in Order of What Makes Employees Stick Around)

We all know a bad boss when we see one. But what are the traits of an exceptional boss?
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Chad Manske's curator insight, August 7, 9:37 PM
Grade yourself against this top ten list and correct to right!
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The 12 Stages of Burnout, According to Psychologists

Tell someone 'I'm sick' or 'I'm tired' and you're not really giving them much information. How sick? How tired? Do you have a mild cold or a dread disease? Are you a new parent who hasn't slept in months or did you just enjoy the party last night a little too much?

 

Burnout is the same. It comes in different degrees, from your common 'I can't wait for happy hour' variety, to far more serious 'I need to take a six-month sabbatical and re-evaluate my life' burnout. The appropriate response for different stages is very different.

 

So how do you know how burnt out you are exactly? Science, apparently, can help. Recently 99U's Hamza Khan dug up a classic Scientific American article (subscription required) that describes a 12-stage model of burnout developed by psychologists Herbert Freudenberger and Gail North. Here are the stages the scientists outline:


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 2, 6:41 PM

How bad is your burnout? Here's the scientific answer.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, August 4, 12:41 AM
As work pressure mounts and the need to compete with yourself and your partners becomes a reality, one is exposed to stress. Burnout is the result of your not being able to handle stress. Unfortunately, employee burnout is a serious issue today. Attrition is the result of burnout. However some corporates will not keep their employees for a long time in any case, so it is expected that employees will leave long before burnout takes place.
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Using the Conscious Competence Ladder for Better Workplace Learning

Using the Conscious Competence Ladder for Better Workplace Learning | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Start every learning intervention with an assessment of where your employees are regarding the learning ladder. Help them become aware of how much they already know or don’t know, and of what they “think” they know but may be doing wrong. Use this as a starting point to move your learners up the ladder.

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Leadership in crisis – the new Growth Business opportunity

Leadership in crisis – the new Growth Business opportunity | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Leaders are scared and struggling in this new era of extraordinary and unexpected disruption.

Via Dr. Alison Eyring, Create Wise Leader, Roger Francis
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donhornsby's curator insight, August 17, 9:26 AM
Our findings focus on the enormous potential to change things by modifying culture, mind-set and behaviour. Behaviour and profound lack of understanding of the changing public mood explain a series of leadership failures in the public and private sectors in recent months.
 
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Executive Coaching: The Best Decision You Can Make as a Leader  

Executive Coaching: The Best Decision You Can Make as a Leader   | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

There is a lot of debate and conversation surrounding the question of what makes an effective executive. Executives are deeply knowledgeable about all aspects of their business, they work to create value and deliver results. They are subject matter experts, know their industry thoroughly and make difficult business decisions on a regular basis. On top of this, executives need to form trusting relationships with people both inside and outside of their organization. This is a lot of responsibility for one person to take on, and with so few people to shoulder the burden, it’s understandable why so many CEOs feel lonely, overwhelmed, and isolated.

It can certainly be lonely at C-suite, but nobody should get to such a position that they can’t ask for help and guidance. This is why one source has declared that the smartest business move an executive can ever make is to hire an executive coach. In fact, a number of COOs and CEOs have come forward to discuss their use of executive coaches, explaining the advantages it has offered them.

But are executive coaches really worth the money? What benefits do they offer and how can your day-to-day work and home life improve as a result?


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donhornsby's curator insight, August 17, 9:38 AM
It can certainly be lonely at C-suite, but nobody should get to such a position that they can’t ask for help and guidance. This is why one source has declared that the smartest business move an executive can ever make is to hire an executive coach. In fact, a number of COOs and CEOs have come forward to discuss their use of executive coaches, explaining the advantages it has offered them. But are executive coaches really worth the money? What benefits do they offer and how can your day-to-day work and home life improve as a result?
 
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The Value of Having Fun at Work

The Value of Having Fun at Work | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Do your employees come to work just to collect paychecks? Want them to become brand evangelists? Then, place “fun” on the top of your HR strategy. Seriously. The competitive marketplace for top talent is ruthless. Being a bland, vanilla, or,

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5 ways to Build Your Personal Brand

5 ways to Build Your Personal Brand | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
In this day and age, branding is no longer associated with institutions and organizations, individuals are now brands, they are regarded as influencer

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22 of the Best Motivational Speeches of All Time

22 of the Best Motivational Speeches of All Time | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Need some motivation for tackling that next big challenge? Check out these 22 inspirational speeches.

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george_reed's curator insight, August 8, 11:44 AM
I am a sucker for great speeches and quotations. 
 
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3 Modes Of Thinking: Lateral, Divergent & Convergent Thought -

3 Modes Of Thinking: Lateral, Divergent & Convergent Thought - | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
3 Modes Of Thinking: Lateral, Divergent & Convergent Thought -
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Ask Yourself These 5 Questions Before Deciding On A Leadership Style

Ask Yourself These 5 Questions Before Deciding On A Leadership Style | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

First-time managers often ask themselves how to develop a leadership style that suits them: “Who should I model myself after? What kind of leader should I be?” It’s great to think critically about your approach to managing others, particularly when you’re new to it, but these questions won’t exactly help you.

 

That’s because they assume that leadership is something you try on and show off, a “style” that’s curated and intentional. But especially in the beginning, your style will be based far less on mirroring others’ habits and behaviors and far more on instinct and intuition. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 8, 6:58 PM

To develop a leadership style that’s authentic to you, let it take shape organically, not through intentional curation.

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Questions As The Ultimate Leadership Tool

Questions As The Ultimate Leadership Tool | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Another example of a leader who makes effective use of questions is Commander D. Michael Abrashoff. 

 

Via donhornsby, Roy Sheneman, PhD, Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
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donhornsby's curator insight, February 8, 9:51 AM
When are you going to ask yourself some of these powerful questions?
 
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, February 10, 4:16 PM
The questions we ask as leaders and teqachers should not presume answers. Hans-Georg Gadamer wrote about eloquent questions without presumed answers. The questions structured the dialogue.
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#HR Marshall Goldsmith’s Five Essential Books on Leadership | Box of Crayons

#HR Marshall Goldsmith’s Five Essential Books on Leadership | Box of Crayons | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Marshall Goldsmith is consistently named to Forbes' The World’s Most Influential Business Thinkers list and has been recognized as the top-rated executive coach at the Thinkers50 ceremony in London since 2011. Marshall is also an award-winning author, and his recent book, Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts—Becoming the Person You Want to Be, is a Wall Street Journal and New York Times #1 bestseller. I'm thrilled that he is my guest blogger today, sharing his five essential books on leadership. Book 1: Old Path White Clouds: Walking in the Footsteps of the Buddha By Thich Nhat Hanh This book makes me feel peaceful and content as I read it. It is very simple and very profound at the same time. Book 2: Hesselbein on Leadership By Frances Hesselbein Peter Drucker said that Frances Hesselbein is the greatest leader he ever met. Read this book and you will agree with him! Book 3: The Leadership Challenge: How to Make Extraordinary Things Happen in Organizations By Barry Posner and

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, July 7, 11:55 AM
The books are interesting, including one by Thich Nhat Hanh: Old Path White Clouds: Walking in the Footsteps of Buddha.
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The Life-Changing Habit of Starting Your Day on Purpose

A purposeful day is critical in achieving better results
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Chad Manske's curator insight, August 7, 9:59 PM
Planning to use your time better will make you more productive. Read through these strategies to get going.
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Why Taking Responsibility Is Always the Best Leadership Choice

Why Taking Responsibility Is Always the Best Leadership Choice | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
The main goal of choosing to take ownership of the issue to begin with was ensuring everybody could get back to work and resume pre-crisis levels of productivity and pride in their jobs. Don’t allow an issue to define you, or the organization. Everybody has lots to do – especially you. While you have to learn from your mistakes, avoid comparing every situation to the crises of yesterday. Stop yourself from reminding everybody constantly of what has already transpired. The issue occurred. You took responsibility for it, held people accountable and, with everybody’s help, you fixed it. You pledged not to make the same mistake again. It’s in your rearview. Keep it there. And get back to the exciting work of creating enduring value for all your stakeholders.

The next time you’re in the midst of a crisis, don’t try to deflect, or underestimate people, or nitpick about whose fault it was. Choose to take responsibility as the leader. Own the problem, take a hard-nosed approach, hold people accountable, present a solution, get to work, and don’t make the same mistake twice. You’ll stave off disaster, fix problems faster, build trust, and get better results.

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David Hain's curator insight, August 3, 5:29 AM

Great advice from Doug Conant!

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 3, 2:11 PM
We teach through our examples and character. Pedagogy and educate etymologically come from leading. The virtues and character of a leader say more than their words.
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 3, 5:06 PM

I totally agree!

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Forget SMART Goals and Try This Instead

Forget SMART Goals and Try This Instead | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Forget SMART Goals and try compass goals instead. You'll learn why SMART goals have been keeping you behind, and what to do to fix it all!

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Ariana Amorim's curator insight, August 3, 5:40 PM
A goal becomes a compass goal when it improves your present in a meaningful, exciting way. It’s there to teach you something about yourself and the world, but you’re not too attached to the outcome you’re going after. With a series of compass goals, life becomes a mixture of interconnecting wormholes that move you toward greater growth and fulfilment.