21st Century Leadership
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21st Century Leadership
Leadership and Encouragement for the 21st Century
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Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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This Is How You Future-Proof Your Brain Against Increasing Distractions

This Is How You Future-Proof Your Brain Against Increasing Distractions | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
 

It’s no secret that technology advancements have affected our brains. With instant messages, push notifications, wearable technology, and many other tech-driven distractions, the pace at which we are expected to respond has accelerated. We’re multitasking with unfortunate effects. How much more can our brains take? And is it possible to future-proof them for all the technical advances yet to come?

 

Performance expert and Australian medical practitioner Jenny Brockis, author of Future Brain: 12 Keys to Develop Your High-Performing Brain, thinks so. Our brains are designed to adapt, but there’s a difference between adjusting to change and expecting an organ to endure relentless stress without time to renew, she says. So the first step to future-proofing our brains lies in good physical care, including nutrition, exercise, sleep, and downtime, she says.


Via The Learning Factor
Roy Sheneman, PhD's insight:
With the advent of new technology comes the price of increased distraction. It is important to realize this fact and go defend against it.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, January 22, 5:15 PM

Is it possible to train your brain to cope with an ever more fast-paced world? In some cases, more tech might save us from tech overload.

Ralston Baldeagle's curator insight, January 22, 11:35 PM

Well, adapting in a world full of technology is a bit hard but breaking loose from the hole will take a while. The pros of make your brain proof of distractions is basically try new methods of improvement and having a healthy nutrition. The cons would basically be remaining stagnant and not changing.

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the Science Of Persuasion - Robert Cialdini

For more visit our blog at www.insideinfluence.com Animation describing the Universal Principles of Persuasion based on the research of Dr. Robert Cialdini, ...
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Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Surviving Leadership Chaos
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8 Common Mistakes in How Our Brains Think and How to Prevent Them

8 Common Mistakes in How Our Brains Think and How to Prevent Them | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Get ready to have your mind blown:

 

1. We surround ourselves with information that matches our beliefs

 

2. We believe in the “swimmer’s body” illusion

 

3. We worry about things we’ve already lost

 

4. We incorrectly predict odds

 

5. We rationalize purchases we don’t want

 

6. We make decisions based on the anchoring effect

 

7. We believe our memories more than facts

 

8. We pay more attention to stereotypes than we think


Via Jim Manske, Alessandro Cerboni, Philippe Vallat, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, Roy Sheneman, PhD, donhornsby
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Troy Crayton's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:00 PM

Thank you for making us "aware" of this article, Duane....

donhornsby's curator insight, October 7, 2013 9:52 AM

(From the article): Clearly, it’s normal for us to be irrational and to think illogically, especially when language acts as a limitation to how we think, even though we rarely realize we’re doing it. Still, being aware of the pitfalls we often fall into when making decisions can help us to at least recognize them, if not avoid them.

Have you come across any other interesting mistakes we make in the way we think?

Lawrence Lanoff's curator insight, December 30, 2013 12:18 AM

This article is dense, but profound. Worth chomping on if you have some time. 

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
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Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things

Enron, Worldcom, Bernie Madoff — the past decade has brought us a long parade of headlines involving unethical behavior. And in the face of these scandals, psychologists and economists have been slowly reworking how they think about the cause of unethical behavior. In general, when we think about bad behavior, we think about it being tied to character: Bad people do bad things. But that model, researchers say, is profoundly inadequate.


Via Pamir Kiciman
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Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Influence vs manipulation
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Why do you make bad decisions?

Why do you make bad decisions? | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
From cognitive bias to groupthink - this chart shows what could be clouding your thinking

Via Philippe Vallat, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN
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Paulo Amendoeira's curator insight, February 1, 2016 6:11 AM

Why do you make bad decisions?

Lorien Pratt's curator insight, May 27, 2016 11:09 PM

A nice chart with the classic biases

LuizQuaglia's curator insight, September 16, 2016 11:18 AM
Decisões ruins! Aqui 20 viés cognitivos que estragam nossas decisões. 
Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Learning & Performance Innovation
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8 Common Mistakes in How Our Brains Think and How to Prevent Them

8 Common Mistakes in How Our Brains Think and How to Prevent Them | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Get ready to have your mind blown:

 

1. We surround ourselves with information that matches our beliefs

 

2. We believe in the “swimmer’s body” illusion

 

3. We worry about things we’ve already lost

 

4. We incorrectly predict odds

 

5. We rationalize purchases we don’t want

 

6. We make decisions based on the anchoring effect

 

7. We believe our memories more than facts

 

8. We pay more attention to stereotypes than we think


Via Jim Manske, Alessandro Cerboni, Philippe Vallat, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, Roy Sheneman, PhD, donhornsby, Himanshu Kakkar
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Troy Crayton's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:00 PM

Thank you for making us "aware" of this article, Duane....

donhornsby's curator insight, October 7, 2013 9:52 AM

(From the article): Clearly, it’s normal for us to be irrational and to think illogically, especially when language acts as a limitation to how we think, even though we rarely realize we’re doing it. Still, being aware of the pitfalls we often fall into when making decisions can help us to at least recognize them, if not avoid them.

Have you come across any other interesting mistakes we make in the way we think?

Lawrence Lanoff's curator insight, December 30, 2013 12:18 AM

This article is dense, but profound. Worth chomping on if you have some time. 

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Influence vs manipulation
Scoop.it!

8 Common Mistakes in How Our Brains Think and How to Prevent Them

8 Common Mistakes in How Our Brains Think and How to Prevent Them | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Get ready to have your mind blown:

 

1. We surround ourselves with information that matches our beliefs

 

2. We believe in the “swimmer’s body” illusion

 

3. We worry about things we’ve already lost

 

4. We incorrectly predict odds

 

5. We rationalize purchases we don’t want

 

6. We make decisions based on the anchoring effect

 

7. We believe our memories more than facts

 

8. We pay more attention to stereotypes than we think


Via Jim Manske, Alessandro Cerboni, Philippe Vallat, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN
more...
Troy Crayton's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:00 PM

Thank you for making us "aware" of this article, Duane....

donhornsby's curator insight, October 7, 2013 9:52 AM

(From the article): Clearly, it’s normal for us to be irrational and to think illogically, especially when language acts as a limitation to how we think, even though we rarely realize we’re doing it. Still, being aware of the pitfalls we often fall into when making decisions can help us to at least recognize them, if not avoid them.

Have you come across any other interesting mistakes we make in the way we think?

Lawrence Lanoff's curator insight, December 30, 2013 12:18 AM

This article is dense, but profound. Worth chomping on if you have some time.