21st Century Leadership
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21st Century Leadership
Leadership and Encouragement for the 21st Century
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Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Coaching Leaders
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The Science of Learning: 5 Things to Literally Keep in Mind

The Science of Learning: 5 Things to Literally Keep in Mind | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
While our technology changes at an incredible rate, the brain evolves slowly, allowing for the vast amount of existing cognitive-science research on how the brain takes in information. To create powerful learning experiences, it’s helpful to understand how the brain works. Translating research into meaningful, evidence-based practices, programs, and policies is crucial for learning and development professionals seeking to gain the most impact out of their endeavors.

The five methods by which the brain processes information below will put you on track to improve your own learning and development initiatives.

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, June 22, 6:24 AM

Understanding our brains is fast becoming a game changing skill for successful people. Useful starter article here!

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Why You Need To Feed Your Brain Different Experiences

Why You Need To Feed Your Brain Different Experiences | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
You wouldn't eat one food all the time, so why do you spend all of your workday in front of a screen?

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Suvi Salo
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Graeme Reid's curator insight, August 6, 2014 10:48 PM

Encapsulated in the phrase - ''Variety is the spice of life".

Judih Weinstein Haggai's curator insight, August 7, 2014 12:15 AM

Good ideas - cognitive diversity to keep  our brain in shape

54321ignition's curator insight, August 7, 2014 7:39 AM

Yes, I'd recommend parachuting to everyone afraid of heights! It cured mine.

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Good News For A Change
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How to Build a Happier Brain

How to Build a Happier Brain | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
A neuropsychological approach to happiness, by meeting core needs (safety, satisfaction, and connection) and training neurons to overcome a negativity bias

Via David McGavock, Create Wise Leader, Bobby Dillard
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David McGavock's curator insight, October 25, 2013 10:41 AM

"Hanson’s book (a sort of self-help manual grounded in research on learning and brain structure) doesn’t suggest that we avoid dwelling on negative experiences altogether—that would be impossible. Instead, he advocates training our brains to appreciate positive experiences when we do have them, by taking the time to focus on them and install them in the brain."


It is easy to forget how good we have it rather than watching for the next shoe to fall. Rick Hanson posits that that is due to the way we are wired; a necessity for survival. 

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Coaching Leaders
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Neuroscience & Creativity: New Findings

Neuroscience & Creativity: New Findings | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

"Thoughtful cognitive neuroscientists such as Rex Jung, Darya Zabelina, Andreas Fink, John Kounios, Mark Beeman, Kalina Christoff, Oshin Vartanian, Jeremy Gray, Hikaru Takeuchi and others are on the forefront of investigating what actually happens in the brain during the creative process. And their findings are overturning conventional notions surrounding the neuroscience of creativity.

 

The latest findings from the real neuroscience of creativity suggest that the right brain/left brain distinction is not the right one when it comes to understanding how creativity is implemented in the brain. Creativity does not involve a single brain region or single side of the brain.

 

Instead, the entire creative process– from the initial burst of inspiration to the final polished product– consists of many interacting cognitive processes and emotions. Depending on the stage of the creative process, and what you’re actually attempting to create, different brain regions are recruited to handle the task."


Via Carol Sherriff, David Hain
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Julie King's curator insight, September 2, 2013 1:06 PM

Creative process involves the whole brain!

Carol Sherriff's curator insight, September 5, 2013 6:26 AM

As humans we seem programmed to divide everything into this and that. Then find out it is all part of a much wider whole. Brain and creativity no different after all!

santina kerslake's curator insight, September 5, 2013 1:17 PM

Left + Right = Creativity, interesting news from neuroscience.

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
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The Brain: How The Brain Rewires Itself

The Brain: How The Brain Rewires Itself | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

The adult brain retains impressive powers of "neuroplasticity"--the ability to change its structure and function in response to experience. These aren't minor tweaks either. Something as basic as the function of the visual or auditory cortex can change as a result of a person's experience of becoming deaf or blind at a young age. Even when the brain suffers a trauma late in life, it can rezone itself like a city in a frenzy of urban renewal. If a stroke knocks out, say, the neighborhood of motor cortex that moves the right arm, a new technique called constraint-induced movement therapy can coax next-door regions to take over the function of the damaged area. The brain can be rewired.

The first discoveries of neuroplasticity came from studies of how changes in the messages the brain receives through the senses can alter its structure and function. When no transmissions arrive from the eyes in someone who has been blind from a young age, for instance, the visual cortex can learn to hear or feel or even support verbal memory. When signals from the skin or muscles bombard the motor cortex or the somatosensory cortex (which processes touch), the brain expands the area that is wired to move, say, the fingers. In this sense, the very structure of our brain--the relative size of different regions, the strength of connections between them, even their functions--reflects the lives we have led. Like sand on a beach, the brain bears the footprints of the decisions we have made, the skills we have learned, the actions we have taken.

 

As scientists probe the limits of neuroplasticity, they are finding that mind sculpting can occur even without input from the outside world. The brain can change as a result of the thoughts we think. This has important implications for health: something as seemingly insubstantial as a thought can affect the very stuff of the brain, altering neuronal connections in a way that can treat mental illness or, perhaps, lead to a greater capacity for empathy and compassion. It may even dial up the supposedly immovable happiness set point.

 

 


Via Pamir Kiciman
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Pamir Kiciman's comment, June 14, 2013 7:02 AM
Thanks for the comments...
Jolanda Gerbecks's curator insight, December 19, 2013 4:44 PM

Hellup, altijd gelukkig, is dat nu zo fijn?

Is het niet juist die enkele down periode, waarna het licht des te sterker gaat schijnen en dat alles weer mogelijk maakt?

 

Rond deze tijd van het jaar, als de dagen weer langer worden doet de natuur het ook.

 

Dus laat jezelf ook eens depri zijn, dan is het geluk daarna weer extra fijn.

 

Dat we onze hersenen vormen met onze gedachten lijkt me nogal wiedes, dat doen de woorden hier en al onze daden in 3d immers ook. Zo boven zo beneden, zo binnen zo buiten ;-)

 

Feit is, onze hersenen dragen werkelijk de voetstappen van onze beslissingen in ons brein.

Je verleden ligt immers in al je lichaamscellen op verschillende wijze opgeborgen.

 

Geluk hierbij is dat je altijd vrij bent om opnieuw te kiezen en je eerdere mentale voetstappen uit te wissen, enkel en alleen door een ander gedachtenpad af te wandelen.

 

Dat is "The road less travelled".

Jolanda Gerbecks's curator insight, August 17, 2014 6:12 AM

The adult brain retains impressive powers of "neuroplasticity"--the ability to change its structure and function in response to experience. These aren't minor tweaks either. Something as basic as the function of the visual or auditory cortex can change as a result of a person's experience of becoming deaf or blind at a young age. Even when the brain suffers a trauma late in life, it can rezone itself like a city in a frenzy of urban renewal. If a stroke knocks out, say, the neighborhood of motor cortex that moves the right arm, a new technique called constraint-induced movement therapy can coax next-door regions to take over the function of the damaged area. The brain can be rewired.

The first discoveries of neuroplasticity came from studies of how changes in the messages the brain receives through the senses can alter its structure and function. When no transmissions arrive from the eyes in someone who has been blind from a young age, for instance, the visual cortex can learn to hear or feel or even support verbal memory. When signals from the skin or muscles bombard the motor cortex or the somatosensory cortex (which processes touch), the brain expands the area that is wired to move, say, the fingers. In this sense, the very structure of our brain--the relative size of different regions, the strength of connections between them, even their functions--reflects the lives we have led. Like sand on a beach, the brain bears the footprints of the decisions we have made, the skills we have learned, the actions we have taken.

 

As scientists probe the limits of neuroplasticity, they are finding that mind sculpting can occur even without input from the outside world. The brain can change as a result of the thoughts we think. This has important implications for health: something as seemingly insubstantial as a thought can affect the very stuff of the brain, altering neuronal connections in a way that can treat mental illness or, perhaps, lead to a greater capacity for empathy and compassion. It may even dial up the supposedly immovable happiness set point.

 

 

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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This Is How You Future-Proof Your Brain Against Increasing Distractions

This Is How You Future-Proof Your Brain Against Increasing Distractions | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
 

It’s no secret that technology advancements have affected our brains. With instant messages, push notifications, wearable technology, and many other tech-driven distractions, the pace at which we are expected to respond has accelerated. We’re multitasking with unfortunate effects. How much more can our brains take? And is it possible to future-proof them for all the technical advances yet to come?

 

Performance expert and Australian medical practitioner Jenny Brockis, author of Future Brain: 12 Keys to Develop Your High-Performing Brain, thinks so. Our brains are designed to adapt, but there’s a difference between adjusting to change and expecting an organ to endure relentless stress without time to renew, she says. So the first step to future-proofing our brains lies in good physical care, including nutrition, exercise, sleep, and downtime, she says.


Via The Learning Factor
Roy Sheneman, PhD's insight:
With the advent of new technology comes the price of increased distraction. It is important to realize this fact and go defend against it.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, January 22, 5:15 PM

Is it possible to train your brain to cope with an ever more fast-paced world? In some cases, more tech might save us from tech overload.

Ralston Baldeagle's curator insight, January 22, 11:35 PM

Well, adapting in a world full of technology is a bit hard but breaking loose from the hole will take a while. The pros of make your brain proof of distractions is basically try new methods of improvement and having a healthy nutrition. The cons would basically be remaining stagnant and not changing.

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Personal Development
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How To Make The Perfect First Impression (According To Science)

How To Make The Perfect First Impression (According To Science) | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Can we really judge a book by its cover? When it comes to making snap judgments about others, it turns out, we may be pretty good at doing just that.

 

We've all heard the truism, "You only make one first impression." It's true -- and these impressions may be more powerful than we would imagine.

 

Our brains take in a huge number of verbal and non-verbal cues almost instantaneously when we meet someone (or just look at a photo of them) to calculate powerful impressions that are often as accurate as the impressions we form over longer periods of time.


Via The Learning Factor, Strategic Leadership Group
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, June 2, 2014 7:06 AM

How to make the perfect first impression (according to science).

Graeme Reid's curator insight, June 3, 2014 2:21 AM

Creating trust in the first meeting is so important - let the other person feel understood.

Michael Binzer's curator insight, June 4, 2014 5:15 AM

First impressions DO matter. Interested in tips?

 

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Wise Leadership
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The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread

The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
In the second of a two-part series Jonathan Gottschall discusses the unique power stories have to change minds and the key to their effectiveness.

Via Karen Dietz, Create Wise Leader
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 21, 2013 12:50 PM

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).


He does a good job in laying that foundation.


I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:


1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.


2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.


Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 


Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

John Michel's curator insight, October 22, 2013 5:36 AM

 When we enter into a story, we enter into an altered mental state--a state of high suggestibility.

Charlie Dare's curator insight, October 22, 2013 7:55 PM

Many songs in particular Country or blues ballards tell a story often of love lost like "Me and Bobby Magee "..."

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).

 

He does a good job in laying that foundation.

 

I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:

 

1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.

 

2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.

 

Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 

 

Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling"

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Human behaviour: is it all in the brain – or the mind?

Human behaviour: is it all in the brain – or the mind? | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Neuroimaging is seen as the key to understanding everything we do, but, in their controversial new book, Sally Satel and Scott O Lilienfeld say this approach is misguided

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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