21st Century Leadership
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Leadership and Encouragement for the 21st Century
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Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from The Daily Leadership Scoop
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Ask Yourself These 5 Questions Before Deciding On A Leadership Style

Ask Yourself These 5 Questions Before Deciding On A Leadership Style | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

First-time managers often ask themselves how to develop a leadership style that suits them: “Who should I model myself after? What kind of leader should I be?” It’s great to think critically about your approach to managing others, particularly when you’re new to it, but these questions won’t exactly help you.

 

That’s because they assume that leadership is something you try on and show off, a “style” that’s curated and intentional. But especially in the beginning, your style will be based far less on mirroring others’ habits and behaviors and far more on instinct and intuition. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing.


Via The Learning Factor, Roger Francis, Bobby Dillard
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 8, 6:58 PM

To develop a leadership style that’s authentic to you, let it take shape organically, not through intentional curation.

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How Becoming A Good Listener Can Make You A Better Leader

How Becoming A Good Listener Can Make You A Better Leader | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Running a business is an inherently emotional experience. Even the most stoic leaders are bound to find themselves becoming invested not only in outcomes, but in people and processes as well.

 

While emotional leadership is often regarded as a liability, lack of personal investment can also bring about negative outcomes.

 

I’ve learned that the best leaders are those who can recognize emotionally-charged situations, rise above the passions of the movement, and maintain a level head. Good leaders are quick to listen and slow to anger.


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leafprovide's comment, July 31, 4:50 AM
Like teaching (educate and pedagogy are etymologically about leading) leading is about listening first. Sometimes asking questions furthers the conversation and understanding of others. They solve their problems.
libertopereda's curator insight, July 31, 4:09 PM

What does it mean to listen? Listening points to four levels: what we can see and hear, the emotions and thoughts, the sensations and what's wanting to emerge (or not). How much of our listening is directed to each of these four levels? Do we really listen when we speak? Do we listen inwards, outwards, both, or neither? Listening comes from the feminine side of us, specially deep listening. What is needed for a deeper listening? What is all this noise telling us?

Andrew Man's curator insight, August 5, 4:05 PM
Good leaders listens first
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The Science of Learning: 5 Things to Literally Keep in Mind

The Science of Learning: 5 Things to Literally Keep in Mind | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
While our technology changes at an incredible rate, the brain evolves slowly, allowing for the vast amount of existing cognitive-science research on how the brain takes in information. To create powerful learning experiences, it’s helpful to understand how the brain works. Translating research into meaningful, evidence-based practices, programs, and policies is crucial for learning and development professionals seeking to gain the most impact out of their endeavors.

The five methods by which the brain processes information below will put you on track to improve your own learning and development initiatives.

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David Hain's curator insight, June 22, 6:24 AM

Understanding our brains is fast becoming a game changing skill for successful people. Useful starter article here!

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What I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started My First Job

What I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started My First Job | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

I can admit it now; I  was completely clueless about a lot of things in my first job out of college. From navigating complicated office hierarchies to knowing exactly what to wear in the workplace, and just exactly how I was supposed to figure things out myself when I had no idea what I was doing. It took me a while to understand the etiquette and unspoken rules of the workplace that now seem so obvious.

 

Of course, I learned with time and would probably not trade my then-naivety for anything else. It did, after all, force me to learn lessons that are so drilled in my head now as a working person. If it wasn’t for my cringeworthy expectation that I was always going to be given clear instructions and then realizing I was wrong, my brain wouldn’t be set to the “automatically anticipate needs” mode that it’s on today. If it wasn’t for me being completely unhappy (and useless) in my first job, I might not have been brave enough to take the plunge and pursue the career that I really wanted.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, June 14, 6:31 PM

Being resourceful is important, and job descriptions always change.

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Want Success? Know Business Storytelling's Dirty Little Secret

Want Success? Know Business Storytelling's Dirty Little Secret | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Most leaders and companies are only going to be mildly successful with
storytelling. Results are lackluster or don't last. Sometimes it results in
"Oh, we tried that here. It didn't work." Find out why and what to do about
it.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, April 20, 5:21 PM

Not every business storytelling program will be successful. And I've heard too many comments from companies like "Oh, we tried that here...it didn't work."

 

So what does make business storytelling successful? In this blog post I spell it out exactly. Don't waste time, money, and effort because you don't know how to be successful.

 

Time to get your story on based around success principles. I  hope these tips make a difference for you.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Check out her website at www.juststoryit.com

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To Be An Effective Leader Keep A Leadership Journal

To Be An Effective Leader Keep A Leadership Journal | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Teddy Roosevelt did it. Harry Truman did it. Want to be an outstanding leader? Keep a leadership journal. As part of my executive coaching work, one of the most effective tools I recommend that powers up the coaching process is a leadership journal.  The exercise of leadership is not unlike a sport you play. When you review your actions in the field you learn what worked, what didn’t, and adjust along the way. Leadership guru Peter Drucker said: “ Follow effective action with quiet reflection. From the quiet reflection will come even more effective action. ”


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drula eric's curator insight, April 4, 2:33 PM
Pensez-vous que vous faites le type d'argent que vous méritez? Êtes-vous fatigué de travailler pour autre chose? Voulez-vous prendre une pause? Vous voyez, la crise mondiale est loin d'être terminée. Emplois de nos jours ne sont plus en sécurité. Et la plupart des emplois juste assez payer pour survivre. Oui, mon ami, il est temps de cesser de faire ce que vous faites ... ... et vérifier comment vous pouvez faire le premier pas à la liberté financière que vous avez toujours rêvé de: http://esselte974.fr/your-online-store-free-and-fast-2/
donhornsby's curator insight, April 5, 9:20 AM
Follow effective action with quiet reflection. From the quiet reflection will come even more effective action
 
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 5, 4:23 PM
I think this is an underused tool in many professions. Moreover, we do not journal about what we experience and how we feel about those experiences. We want to shape the world without reshaping ourselves.
Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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5 Morning Rituals That Will Double Your Energy Levels

5 Morning Rituals That Will Double Your Energy Levels | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Whether you're at the starting line preparing to compete for the gold in the 100 meters or you're trying to be at your most productive state--how you start often predicts the outcome.

If you stumble at the start of the 100 meters--it's nearly impossible to catch up. If you get off to a lethargic start to your day--you're going to be reacting to the day instead of being proactive.

Successful people understand that the day starts as soon as their alarm clock rings.

If you desire to become a more productive, healthier, and happier individual, here are five powerful morning habits to do before starting your workday, and in turn, help you win the day.


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Allan Whitworth's curator insight, March 15, 3:18 AM
what's good for the worker is good for the customer
donhornsby's curator insight, March 15, 10:12 AM
If you desire to become a more productive, healthier, and happier individual, adopt these five powerful morning habits. Practice them before starting your workday to, in turn, help you win the day.
 
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 16, 8:45 AM
5 Morning Rituals That Will Double Your Energy Levels
Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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Your Brain Has A “Shuffle” Button--Here’s How To Use It

Your Brain Has A “Shuffle” Button--Here’s How To Use It | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
In the early 1890s, everybody wanted the newest technological marvel. Democratic and affordable, the bicycle could cut people's commute to work in half and enable them to enjoy the countryside on the weekend. Thousands of bicycle mechanics appeared as if overnight, looking to make bicycles lighter, safer, more comfortable, and easier to pro­duce. They would tinker with ball bearings, rolled steel, differential gears, air-filled tires, and so on.
 
The more raw material you give your brain, the more connections it can make.

Many of these enthusiasts would later use what they’d learned in bicycle workshops to create greater transportation breakthroughs. Both of the Wright Brothers were bicycle mechanics. So was a man named Henry Ford, who watched mass production take hold at a time when cyclists began lobbying for better roads to be built. Before long, thanks to him, the modern automobile was ambling down them.

 


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 21, 6:05 PM

Having breakthrough ideas means priming your brain with lots of raw material for it to rummage through at random.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, February 21, 10:02 PM
The more raw material you give to the brain, the more creative it will become. The brain tends to shuffle through a lot of information before coming to a conclusion, a solution or and idea. The implications of this belief for school education is obvious, give students a content rich environment. What matters most greatly is for people to have access to diverse content, even if it is content that they are not professionally related to! 
 
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Five Ways To Say "No" So You Can Finally Reclaim Your Focus

Five Ways To Say "No" So You Can Finally Reclaim Your Focus | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

It isn't news that culture is obsessed with doing—with being in motion, with being occupied, with being busy. But the upshot of all this doing is that we spend very little time deciding exactly what we should be doing in the first place.

 

Real productivity is more than just activity, after all. And when we're asked to act upon (or ignore) hundreds of updates, requests, and interruptions every single day, to actually step back and decide can be much more difficult than to simply do. Amid all this bombardment, being truly productive depends upon your ability to say "no." In other words, what you don’t do on a daily basis is at least—if not more—important than what you actually do take action on.


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Adele Taylor's curator insight, January 23, 4:51 PM
Great read, particularly number 2, the point they are making applies to almost everyone I know
CCM Consultancy's curator insight, January 24, 3:03 AM

"Real productivity is more than just activity"

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Five Ways To Say "No" So You Can Finally Reclaim Your Focus

Five Ways To Say "No" So You Can Finally Reclaim Your Focus | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

It isn't news that culture is obsessed with doing—with being in motion, with being occupied, with being busy. But the upshot of all this doing is that we spend very little time deciding exactly what we should be doing in the first place.

 

Real productivity is more than just activity, after all. And when we're asked to act upon (or ignore) hundreds of updates, requests, and interruptions every single day, to actually step back and decide can be much more difficult than to simply do. Amid all this bombardment, being truly productive depends upon your ability to say "no." In other words, what you don’t do on a daily basis is at least—if not more—important than what you actually do take action on.


Via The Learning Factor
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Adele Taylor's curator insight, January 23, 4:51 PM
Great read, particularly number 2, the point they are making applies to almost everyone I know
CCM Consultancy's curator insight, January 24, 3:03 AM

"Real productivity is more than just activity"

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Learning At Work
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7 Destructive Habits You Need to Eliminate From Your Daily Routine

7 Destructive Habits You Need to Eliminate From Your Daily Routine | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

The internet is chock full of daily habits that will help your routine, but what about bad habits? Because habits are so ingrained into our daily routines, we often don't notice how harmful ones sneak in and ruin our success.

 

Try eliminating the following habits from your life and see how your success in business and in life improve:


Via The Learning Factor, Roger Francis
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, December 18, 2016 4:44 PM

These common habits are a lot more damaging than you might believe.

Aar Aar's comment, December 20, 2016 11:29 PM
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Aar Aar's comment, December 20, 2016 11:29 PM
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Does Your Company's Purpose Resonate With Everyone, Or Just Senior Leaders?

Does Your Company's Purpose Resonate With Everyone, Or Just Senior Leaders? | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Discovering your company's "purpose" is tough. Sustaining it can be even tougher. Even if you've zeroed in on a mission that your executives love, it won't do your company much good if the rest of your team doesn't share the same sentiment.

 

The challenge is to make sure your entire organization is willing to buy into its stated purpose. The consulting firm Radley Yeldar, which ranks brands according to "social purpose," gives the top spot to Unilever for its sustainability efforts, among other causes beyond the company's bottom line to which it has shown commitment.


Via The Learning Factor, Roger Francis
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 10, 2016 5:58 PM

If your own employees write off your shiny new mission statement as just another marketing trick, so will your customers.

Peter Krull's curator insight, November 10, 2016 8:53 PM
Mission & purpose are critical at Krull & Company!
Pam Ross's curator insight, November 15, 2016 8:33 AM
Connecting employees to purpose is so important for culture, trust, engagement, accountability.
Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from New Leadership
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You Don’t Need a Title to Be a Great Leader

You Don’t Need a Title to Be a Great Leader | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Many people believe leadership is something that's conferred along with a title or attained when you direct a team of people, but true leadership is never about authority or power. It's about helping others grow, and that's something anyone can do.

 

If it's your desire to influence and have an impact on others, you have leadership qualities. And if you can inspire people to do something they thought they couldn't do, demonstrate how the impossible is possible, believe in someone when they didn't believe in themselves, you're already a leader.

 

People don't set out to be great leaders, they set out to make a difference. It's never about the role or the title, but about influencing others, helping and supporting them.


Via The Learning Factor, Roger Francis
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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 19, 2016 2:23 PM

So True!

Brad Merrick's curator insight, August 22, 2016 8:01 AM
Leadership needs to be visible, not always audible! You need to strive to make a difference and know that your perseverance can impact and change others.
Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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The 12 Stages of Burnout, According to Psychologists

Tell someone 'I'm sick' or 'I'm tired' and you're not really giving them much information. How sick? How tired? Do you have a mild cold or a dread disease? Are you a new parent who hasn't slept in months or did you just enjoy the party last night a little too much?

 

Burnout is the same. It comes in different degrees, from your common 'I can't wait for happy hour' variety, to far more serious 'I need to take a six-month sabbatical and re-evaluate my life' burnout. The appropriate response for different stages is very different.

 

So how do you know how burnt out you are exactly? Science, apparently, can help. Recently 99U's Hamza Khan dug up a classic Scientific American article (subscription required) that describes a 12-stage model of burnout developed by psychologists Herbert Freudenberger and Gail North. Here are the stages the scientists outline:


Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 2, 6:41 PM

How bad is your burnout? Here's the scientific answer.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, August 4, 12:41 AM
As work pressure mounts and the need to compete with yourself and your partners becomes a reality, one is exposed to stress. Burnout is the result of your not being able to handle stress. Unfortunately, employee burnout is a serious issue today. Attrition is the result of burnout. However some corporates will not keep their employees for a long time in any case, so it is expected that employees will leave long before burnout takes place.
1
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The go-to interview questions these 28 Australian CEOs always ask job candidates, and why

The go-to interview questions these 28 Australian CEOs always ask job candidates, and why | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

There are a number of job interview styles, from a structured meeting with a list of questions, to a more relaxed setting with free-flowing conversation.

 

Either way, in most cases CEOs have at least one go-to interview question that they believe reveals everything they need to know about a candidate.

 

Some go for serious, thought-provoking questions. Others believe that culture-focused queries will let the potential employee open up.

 

We asked 28 Australian CEOs of their number one interview question that they ask job candidates, and asked them to explain why they use it. Here’s what they had to say.


Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, June 29, 6:31 PM

We asked 28 Australian CEOs of their number one interview question that they ask job candidates, and asked them to explain why they use it. Here’s what they had to say.

Merry James's curator insight, June 30, 2:48 AM
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, July 12, 1:22 PM
Questions about what we do outside work and books make sense. No one asked these kinds of questions when I went for interviews as a teacher.
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Work Flexibility Is No Longer Just A Corporate Issue

Work Flexibility Is No Longer Just A Corporate Issue | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Flexible jobs, or jobs that can be done remotely, are very common today. A recent Gallup survey found that 43% of American employees spend at least some time working remotely.

 

The nearly half of jobs that can be done remote is no surprise to anyone who has been paying attention, as technology has paved the way for workers to unplug or become location independent. It’s the same reason why millennials are keen to become digital nomads and travel while they work.

 

Employers benefit by having remote employees because their productivity spikes without distractions provided by an office environment. Further, a FlexJobs report found that 82% of millennials said they are more loyal to their employer if they have flexible work options.


Via The Learning Factor
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Peter Miller's comment, June 16, 12:47 AM
I consider Work from home the best... Because I follow Just one Rue " PRODUCTIVITY OVER PRESENCE"
rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, June 29, 1:53 AM
Work from home and Flexi-timings are some of the cliched terms that some of the more upcoming and progressive corporates are coming up with. The fact is that the typical ten to five shift might not, after all, be most productive timings. Schools too need to explore the concept of Flexi-timings in order to boost productivity. The ultimate goal of every corporate organization should be productivity, and as long as goals are being met, it should be OK if the employee works from home three or four times in a week.
 
Jerry Busone's curator insight, June 30, 7:46 AM

Pay attention... want to engage and  impact your new workforce ... have flexibility in the work environment  

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Developing Resilience: Overcoming and Growing from Setbacks

Developing Resilience: Overcoming and Growing from Setbacks | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

According to legend, Thomas Edison made thousands of prototypes of the incandescent light bulb before he finally got it right. And, since the prolific inventor was awarded more than 1,000 patents, it's easy to imagine him failing on a daily basis in his lab at Menlo Park.

In spite of struggling with "failure" throughout his entire working life, Edison never let it get the best of him. All of these "failures," which are reported to be in the tens of thousands, simply showed him how not to invent something. His resilience gave the world some of the most amazing inventions of the early 20th century, such as the phonograph, the telegraph, and the motion picture.


Via Roger Francis, donhornsby
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 27, 9:44 AM
Learn from your mistakes and failures. Every mistake has the power to teach you something important; so don't stop searching until you've found the lesson in every situation. Also, make sure that you understand the idea of "post-traumatic growth" – there can be real truth in the saying that "if it doesn't kill you, it makes you stronger."
 
Jerry Busone's curator insight, April 29, 11:00 AM

For evvery set back there's a successs waiting to happen ...stay the course... 

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To Be An Effective Leader Keep A Leadership Journal

To Be An Effective Leader Keep A Leadership Journal | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Teddy Roosevelt did it. Harry Truman did it. Want to be an outstanding leader? Keep a leadership journal. As part of my executive coaching work, one of the most effective tools I recommend that powers up the coaching process is a leadership journal.  The exercise of leadership is not unlike a sport you play. When you review your actions in the field you learn what worked, what didn’t, and adjust along the way. Leadership guru Peter Drucker said: “ Follow effective action with quiet reflection. From the quiet reflection will come even more effective action. ”


Via The Learning Factor, Disera Doss, donhornsby
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drula eric's curator insight, April 4, 2:33 PM
Pensez-vous que vous faites le type d'argent que vous méritez? Êtes-vous fatigué de travailler pour autre chose? Voulez-vous prendre une pause? Vous voyez, la crise mondiale est loin d'être terminée. Emplois de nos jours ne sont plus en sécurité. Et la plupart des emplois juste assez payer pour survivre. Oui, mon ami, il est temps de cesser de faire ce que vous faites ... ... et vérifier comment vous pouvez faire le premier pas à la liberté financière que vous avez toujours rêvé de: http://esselte974.fr/your-online-store-free-and-fast-2/
donhornsby's curator insight, April 5, 9:20 AM
Follow effective action with quiet reflection. From the quiet reflection will come even more effective action
 
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 5, 4:23 PM
I think this is an underused tool in many professions. Moreover, we do not journal about what we experience and how we feel about those experiences. We want to shape the world without reshaping ourselves.
Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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The Emotionally Intelligent Person’s Guide To Being Persuasive | Fast Company

The Emotionally Intelligent Person’s Guide To Being Persuasive | Fast Company | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

You’re a pretty rational person, or so you think: You’re often good at thinking logically and keeping your feelings out of it, right?

Wrong. (Sorry!) It wasn’t long ago that people believed emotions and logic were two completely separate things, operating independently of one another. But breakthroughs in brain science have made it clear that that’s far from true. It turns out that our brains are incapable of making fully unemotional decisions. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, though. In fact, you can use that cognitive reality in your favor to build relationships, network, and gain influence.


Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 16, 5:57 PM

These ridiculously simple brain hacks can subtly encourage people to decide in your favor.

Vanessa Ong Li Wen's curator insight, March 19, 12:14 PM
I agree that at times, we need to angle our argument that targets one’s emotional capacity so as to strengthen the message we are trying to convey and be more persuasive. Although logic is an important factor in allowing people to understand what you are trying to say, simply informing them and convincing them are two separate matters. In essence, using positive emotions to encourage people to believe in you is the right way to go. Once they feel that they have established the connection with you, they will naturally be more inclined to believe whatever it is you are trying to say.
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How To Ask Radically Candid Questions

How To Ask Radically Candid Questions | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Kim Scott, the author of Radical Candor, Be a Kickass Boss Without Losing Your Humanity, knows it can be painful to be a boss, especially when you have to fire someone.  Getting fired is painful, even traumatic.  It can cause financial hardship and damage a person’s self-confidence.  Scott knows the power of asking the right questions when making a tough decision like this.

She recalls having to fire an employee who wasn’t performing as expected and whom she liked personally.  She was nervous when the meeting started.  Then it got worse.  After she said he had to leave the company, this soon-to-be former team member, asked “Why? You never told me I wasn’t measuring up.”

Scott who has managed teams at Google, Apple and Silicon Valley startups, realized he was right.  Why hadn’t she told him?


Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 14, 6:33 PM

Kim Scott, the author of Radical Candor, knows it can be painful to be a boss, especially when you have to fire someone. Getting fired is painful and can cause financial hardship and damage self-confidence. Scott knows the power of asking the right questions when making a tough decision like this.

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Only Leadership and management, sólo Liderazgo
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#Leadership The Eight Habits Of Remarkably Coachable Leaders

#Leadership The Eight Habits Of Remarkably Coachable Leaders | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

In my executive coaching work, one of the most important traits that differentiates high potential leaders is their learning agility.

 

In succession planning discussions, organizations identify leaders who are learning agile because these people quickly learn how to be effective in new and different situations.

 

Organizations hire executive coaches to prepare these leaders for challenging and stretch assignments. Based on my work with these executives, I have distilled eight practices that differentiate the coaching clients who made the greatest gains vs. those that did not. Whether you are being coached by your manager or by an executive coach, these practices will make the difference in your learning agility and impact.


Via The Learning Factor, Ricard Lloria
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 12, 7:49 PM

Want to have greater career success? Become more coachable. Here are eight practices of highly coachable leaders.

Adele Taylor's curator insight, February 13, 4:29 PM
Are you a coachable leader?  I meet some of the criteria
Bryan Worn's curator insight, February 14, 3:22 PM

All so true , however the key word is that they PRACTICE them.

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This Is How You Future-Proof Your Brain Against Increasing Distractions

This Is How You Future-Proof Your Brain Against Increasing Distractions | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
 

It’s no secret that technology advancements have affected our brains. With instant messages, push notifications, wearable technology, and many other tech-driven distractions, the pace at which we are expected to respond has accelerated. We’re multitasking with unfortunate effects. How much more can our brains take? And is it possible to future-proof them for all the technical advances yet to come?

 

Performance expert and Australian medical practitioner Jenny Brockis, author of Future Brain: 12 Keys to Develop Your High-Performing Brain, thinks so. Our brains are designed to adapt, but there’s a difference between adjusting to change and expecting an organ to endure relentless stress without time to renew, she says. So the first step to future-proofing our brains lies in good physical care, including nutrition, exercise, sleep, and downtime, she says.


Via The Learning Factor
Roy Sheneman, PhD's insight:
With the advent of new technology comes the price of increased distraction. It is important to realize this fact and go defend against it.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, January 22, 5:15 PM

Is it possible to train your brain to cope with an ever more fast-paced world? In some cases, more tech might save us from tech overload.

Ralston Baldeagle's curator insight, January 22, 11:35 PM

Well, adapting in a world full of technology is a bit hard but breaking loose from the hole will take a while. The pros of make your brain proof of distractions is basically try new methods of improvement and having a healthy nutrition. The cons would basically be remaining stagnant and not changing.

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Leadership
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How Great Leaders Hire The Right People

How Great Leaders Hire The Right People | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
 

"I look for someone with something to prove—to your old boss, your dad, your third-grade teacher, yourself. I don’t care where it comes from: You need that hustle." —Emily Weiss, founder and CEO, Glossier

 

"I ask, ‘Think of your worst day—what happens?’ You learn about people’s pet peeves, about what environment won’t work for them. Sometimes they disqualify themselves without realizing it, because they reveal they don’t really want the job." —Tom Ogletree, director of social impact, General Assembly


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, January 10, 4:49 PM

Here's what to look for in your next interview.

Gino Bondi's curator insight, January 11, 10:58 AM

Quick read on how to go "deep" with candidates

Jerry Busone's curator insight, January 20, 8:01 AM

For me the number thing to hire right is motivational fit... a person can have all the crendtials but if they don't fit into the team, corporate culture thats a long term receive for disaster. While talented people can contribute in the short term , they might do it at the sacrifice of the good team around them. 

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from New Leadership
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How To Grow Leadership From Within Your Company

How To Grow Leadership From Within Your Company | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Jack Welch, former CEO of General Electric, may have retired 15 years ago, but his influence in corporate America still resonates. Not only is he known as one of the most successful industrial leaders of the 20th century—most notably increasing the value of GE by 4,000 percent—but he is also a great example of how a company can effectively grow powerful leaders from within their own ranks.

 

Welch, who graduated with a Ph.D. in chemical engineering, joined GE in 1960 as a junior chemical engineer. After a year with the company, Welch began seeking other jobs until a mentor in the company’s executive office recognized Welch’s talents and persuaded him to remain at the company. Just seven years later, Welch was appointed vice president of GE’s plastics division, and the climb up the corporate ladder continued. In 1981, Welch became GE’s youngest chairman and CEO.

 

As with GE and many other companies—Xerox, Harley-Davidson, Best Buy and McDonald’s— the next CEO of your company could very well be among your current employees. In fact, in a Forbes study of America’s 100 largest companies, 86 percent of CEOs were appointed from within company ranks. Your executive leadership most likely will be, too. Here are three ways to grow strong leadership from within your company.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, December 13, 2016 4:41 PM

The next CEO of your company may be residing within your company ranks. Here's how to grow strong future leaders from within.

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Six Things Great Bosses Constantly Remind Their Teams

Six Things Great Bosses Constantly Remind Their Teams | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Whether you’ve just started training your first hire or you’ve been managing scores of people for decades, you’re in the position of being a leader. And if there’s one aspect of leadership that holds true, regardless of staff size or industry, it’s that being one isn’t for the thin-skinned or the faint of heart.
 

So much of your job isn’t about hitting goals, but rather about being rooted in reality, constantly striving to bring perspective and empathy to whatever situations you encounter. Sometimes, finding the right words can be the biggest challenge of your day. But other times, you’re overthinking it, and it’s as simple as saying these six tiny sentences.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 8, 2016 5:22 PM

Great leaders tell their team members over and over again to speak their minds and to say no to the right things.