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Leadership and Encouragement for the 21st Century
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Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Teacher's corner
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Why You Need To Feed Your Brain Different Experiences

Why You Need To Feed Your Brain Different Experiences | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
You wouldn't eat one food all the time, so why do you spend all of your workday in front of a screen?

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Suvi Salo
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Graeme Reid's curator insight, August 6, 2014 10:48 PM

Encapsulated in the phrase - ''Variety is the spice of life".

Judih Weinstein Haggai's curator insight, August 7, 2014 12:15 AM

Good ideas - cognitive diversity to keep  our brain in shape

54321ignition's curator insight, August 7, 2014 7:39 AM

Yes, I'd recommend parachuting to everyone afraid of heights! It cured mine.

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Learning & Performance Innovation
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8 Common Mistakes in How Our Brains Think and How to Prevent Them

8 Common Mistakes in How Our Brains Think and How to Prevent Them | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Get ready to have your mind blown:

 

1. We surround ourselves with information that matches our beliefs

 

2. We believe in the “swimmer’s body” illusion

 

3. We worry about things we’ve already lost

 

4. We incorrectly predict odds

 

5. We rationalize purchases we don’t want

 

6. We make decisions based on the anchoring effect

 

7. We believe our memories more than facts

 

8. We pay more attention to stereotypes than we think


Via Jim Manske, Alessandro Cerboni, Philippe Vallat, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, Roy Sheneman, PhD, donhornsby, Himanshu Kakkar
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Troy Crayton's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:00 PM

Thank you for making us "aware" of this article, Duane....

donhornsby's curator insight, October 7, 2013 9:52 AM

(From the article): Clearly, it’s normal for us to be irrational and to think illogically, especially when language acts as a limitation to how we think, even though we rarely realize we’re doing it. Still, being aware of the pitfalls we often fall into when making decisions can help us to at least recognize them, if not avoid them.

Have you come across any other interesting mistakes we make in the way we think?

Lawrence Lanoff's curator insight, December 30, 2013 12:18 AM

This article is dense, but profound. Worth chomping on if you have some time. 

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Influence vs manipulation
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8 Common Mistakes in How Our Brains Think and How to Prevent Them

8 Common Mistakes in How Our Brains Think and How to Prevent Them | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Get ready to have your mind blown:

 

1. We surround ourselves with information that matches our beliefs

 

2. We believe in the “swimmer’s body” illusion

 

3. We worry about things we’ve already lost

 

4. We incorrectly predict odds

 

5. We rationalize purchases we don’t want

 

6. We make decisions based on the anchoring effect

 

7. We believe our memories more than facts

 

8. We pay more attention to stereotypes than we think


Via Jim Manske, Alessandro Cerboni, Philippe Vallat, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN
more...
Troy Crayton's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:00 PM

Thank you for making us "aware" of this article, Duane....

donhornsby's curator insight, October 7, 2013 9:52 AM

(From the article): Clearly, it’s normal for us to be irrational and to think illogically, especially when language acts as a limitation to how we think, even though we rarely realize we’re doing it. Still, being aware of the pitfalls we often fall into when making decisions can help us to at least recognize them, if not avoid them.

Have you come across any other interesting mistakes we make in the way we think?

Lawrence Lanoff's curator insight, December 30, 2013 12:18 AM

This article is dense, but profound. Worth chomping on if you have some time. 

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Training & Development Talents
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It's got to be about Why, not How: How Great Leaders Inspire Action, Simon Sinek

"Why FIRST:  Communication and the Golden Circle:  Why, How, What?  Inspire where others do not.  Profit is JUST a result NOT a reason for existing."

 

Simon's examples include Apple (why so innovative?), Martin Luther King (lead major change, Civil Rights movement), and the Wright brothers (controlled powered manned flight that others did not achieve, tho' were working on.)

 

_________________________

   

"The goal is to do business with people who believe what YOU believe." ~ Simon Sinek

_________________________

   

 

Apple:  NOT, What we do, great computers.  Want to buy one?

RATHER:  Everything we do, we believe in challenging the status quo, we believe thinking differently. The way we challenge the status quo is making products that are beautifully designed, simple to use & user friendly.  We happen to make computers.  Want to buy one?

 

Counterpoint Tivo, which (until a recent court victory that tripled its stock price) appeared to be struggling.  

   

http://www.ted.com Simon Sinek presents a simple but powerful model for how leaders inspire action, starting with a golden circle and the question "Why?" 

 

Source here.

 

More about Deb's world is here:
Planning & Strategy Retreats 

Presentation Videos - Change Results
Deb's mothership: The REVELN website

 

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN, Roy Sheneman, PhD, Madjid Messaad
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Robin Martin's comment, May 11, 2013 12:39 PM
Thanks Deb!
Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Using Your Whole Brain
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Why is Storytelling so Powerful? A Look at What it does to our Brain

Why is Storytelling so Powerful? A Look at What it does to our Brain | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Storytelling is one of the most overused and underused techniques at the same time. In this post, we are revealing what storytelling does to our brains.

Long before we had writing as we know it there has been an oral tradition of storytelling. This post looks at the science around storytelling.

Learn about how a story "can put your whole brain to work" and why "our brains become more active when we tell stories." Find out why the brain "learns to ignore certain overused words and phrases" and much more. If you enjoy telling stories, writing stories, or listening to stories check out this post to learn more!


Via Beth Dichter, Audrey
Roy Sheneman, PhD's insight:

Excellent!

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Audrey's curator insight, December 19, 2012 4:15 PM

Just think about all the schemas (pockets of information) we have for everything we do.  Even though we have never taken part in many activities, we could easily build plausible stories based on those schemas and even devise theories, which may be testable. This is imagination which is one example of brain power, audrey@homeschoolsource.co.uk

44Doors's curator insight, March 11, 2014 10:27 AM

"Anything you’ve experienced, you can get others to experience the same. Or at least, get their brain areas that you’ve activated that way, active too:"

 

"use simple, yet heartfelt language."

"Quick last fact: Our brain learns to ignore certain overused words and phrases that used to make stories awesome"

Art Jones's curator insight, October 28, 2014 5:50 PM

"our brains become more active when we tell stories."

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from The 21st Century
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This is Why We Forget Things

This is Why We Forget Things | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Our brains can easily accommodate so much information, but why is it that we remember some things vividly while forget others almost instantly? It turns out, there's a formula that describes how we forget things.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
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How Inactivity Changes the Brain

How Inactivity Changes the Brain | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Being sedentary appears to alter the brain in ways that may affect heart health, a new study found.

 

A number of studies have shown that exercise can remodel the brain by prompting the creation of new brain cells and inducing other changes. Now it appears that inactivity, too, can remodel the brain, according to a notable new report.

 

The study, which was conducted in rats but likely has implications for people too, the researchers say, found that being sedentary changes the shape of certain neurons in ways that significantly affect not just the brain but the heart as well. The findings may help to explain, in part, why a sedentary lifestyle is so bad for us.

 

Until about 20 years ago, most scientists believed that the brain’s structure was fixed by adulthood, that you couldn’t create new brain cells, alter the shape of those that existed or in any other way change your mind physically after adolescence.

 

But in the years since, neurological studies have established that the brain retains plasticity, or the capacity to be reshaped, throughout our lifetimes. Exercise appears to be particularly adept at remodeling the brain, studies showed.

 

But little has been known about whether inactivity likewise alters the structure of the brain and, if so, what the consequences might be.


Via Pamir Kiciman
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Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Surviving Leadership Chaos
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8 Common Mistakes in How Our Brains Think and How to Prevent Them

8 Common Mistakes in How Our Brains Think and How to Prevent Them | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

Get ready to have your mind blown:

 

1. We surround ourselves with information that matches our beliefs

 

2. We believe in the “swimmer’s body” illusion

 

3. We worry about things we’ve already lost

 

4. We incorrectly predict odds

 

5. We rationalize purchases we don’t want

 

6. We make decisions based on the anchoring effect

 

7. We believe our memories more than facts

 

8. We pay more attention to stereotypes than we think


Via Jim Manske, Alessandro Cerboni, Philippe Vallat, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, Roy Sheneman, PhD, donhornsby
more...
Troy Crayton's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:00 PM

Thank you for making us "aware" of this article, Duane....

donhornsby's curator insight, October 7, 2013 9:52 AM

(From the article): Clearly, it’s normal for us to be irrational and to think illogically, especially when language acts as a limitation to how we think, even though we rarely realize we’re doing it. Still, being aware of the pitfalls we often fall into when making decisions can help us to at least recognize them, if not avoid them.

Have you come across any other interesting mistakes we make in the way we think?

Lawrence Lanoff's curator insight, December 30, 2013 12:18 AM

This article is dense, but profound. Worth chomping on if you have some time. 

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Transformational Leadership
Scoop.it!

Human behaviour: is it all in the brain – or the mind?

Human behaviour: is it all in the brain – or the mind? | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it
Neuroimaging is seen as the key to understanding everything we do, but, in their controversial new book, Sally Satel and Scott O Lilienfeld say this approach is misguided

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
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The Brain: How The Brain Rewires Itself

The Brain: How The Brain Rewires Itself | 21st Century Leadership | Scoop.it

The adult brain retains impressive powers of "neuroplasticity"--the ability to change its structure and function in response to experience. These aren't minor tweaks either. Something as basic as the function of the visual or auditory cortex can change as a result of a person's experience of becoming deaf or blind at a young age. Even when the brain suffers a trauma late in life, it can rezone itself like a city in a frenzy of urban renewal. If a stroke knocks out, say, the neighborhood of motor cortex that moves the right arm, a new technique called constraint-induced movement therapy can coax next-door regions to take over the function of the damaged area. The brain can be rewired.

The first discoveries of neuroplasticity came from studies of how changes in the messages the brain receives through the senses can alter its structure and function. When no transmissions arrive from the eyes in someone who has been blind from a young age, for instance, the visual cortex can learn to hear or feel or even support verbal memory. When signals from the skin or muscles bombard the motor cortex or the somatosensory cortex (which processes touch), the brain expands the area that is wired to move, say, the fingers. In this sense, the very structure of our brain--the relative size of different regions, the strength of connections between them, even their functions--reflects the lives we have led. Like sand on a beach, the brain bears the footprints of the decisions we have made, the skills we have learned, the actions we have taken.

 

As scientists probe the limits of neuroplasticity, they are finding that mind sculpting can occur even without input from the outside world. The brain can change as a result of the thoughts we think. This has important implications for health: something as seemingly insubstantial as a thought can affect the very stuff of the brain, altering neuronal connections in a way that can treat mental illness or, perhaps, lead to a greater capacity for empathy and compassion. It may even dial up the supposedly immovable happiness set point.

 

 


Via Pamir Kiciman
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Pamir Kiciman's comment, June 14, 2013 7:02 AM
Thanks for the comments...
Jolanda Gerbecks's curator insight, December 19, 2013 4:44 PM

Hellup, altijd gelukkig, is dat nu zo fijn?

Is het niet juist die enkele down periode, waarna het licht des te sterker gaat schijnen en dat alles weer mogelijk maakt?

 

Rond deze tijd van het jaar, als de dagen weer langer worden doet de natuur het ook.

 

Dus laat jezelf ook eens depri zijn, dan is het geluk daarna weer extra fijn.

 

Dat we onze hersenen vormen met onze gedachten lijkt me nogal wiedes, dat doen de woorden hier en al onze daden in 3d immers ook. Zo boven zo beneden, zo binnen zo buiten ;-)

 

Feit is, onze hersenen dragen werkelijk de voetstappen van onze beslissingen in ons brein.

Je verleden ligt immers in al je lichaamscellen op verschillende wijze opgeborgen.

 

Geluk hierbij is dat je altijd vrij bent om opnieuw te kiezen en je eerdere mentale voetstappen uit te wissen, enkel en alleen door een ander gedachtenpad af te wandelen.

 

Dat is "The road less travelled".

Jolanda Gerbecks's curator insight, August 17, 2014 6:12 AM

The adult brain retains impressive powers of "neuroplasticity"--the ability to change its structure and function in response to experience. These aren't minor tweaks either. Something as basic as the function of the visual or auditory cortex can change as a result of a person's experience of becoming deaf or blind at a young age. Even when the brain suffers a trauma late in life, it can rezone itself like a city in a frenzy of urban renewal. If a stroke knocks out, say, the neighborhood of motor cortex that moves the right arm, a new technique called constraint-induced movement therapy can coax next-door regions to take over the function of the damaged area. The brain can be rewired.

The first discoveries of neuroplasticity came from studies of how changes in the messages the brain receives through the senses can alter its structure and function. When no transmissions arrive from the eyes in someone who has been blind from a young age, for instance, the visual cortex can learn to hear or feel or even support verbal memory. When signals from the skin or muscles bombard the motor cortex or the somatosensory cortex (which processes touch), the brain expands the area that is wired to move, say, the fingers. In this sense, the very structure of our brain--the relative size of different regions, the strength of connections between them, even their functions--reflects the lives we have led. Like sand on a beach, the brain bears the footprints of the decisions we have made, the skills we have learned, the actions we have taken.

 

As scientists probe the limits of neuroplasticity, they are finding that mind sculpting can occur even without input from the outside world. The brain can change as a result of the thoughts we think. This has important implications for health: something as seemingly insubstantial as a thought can affect the very stuff of the brain, altering neuronal connections in a way that can treat mental illness or, perhaps, lead to a greater capacity for empathy and compassion. It may even dial up the supposedly immovable happiness set point.

 

 

Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from Change Leadership Watch
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It's got to be about Why, not How: How Great Leaders Inspire Action, Simon Sinek

"Why FIRST:  Communication and the Golden Circle:  Why, How, What?  Inspire where others do not.  Profit is JUST a result NOT a reason for existing."

 

Simon's examples include Apple (why so innovative?), Martin Luther King (lead major change, Civil Rights movement), and the Wright brothers (controlled powered manned flight that others did not achieve, tho' were working on.)

 

_________________________

   

"The goal is to do business with people who believe what YOU believe." ~ Simon Sinek

_________________________

   

 

Apple:  NOT, What we do, great computers.  Want to buy one?

RATHER:  Everything we do, we believe in challenging the status quo, we believe thinking differently. The way we challenge the status quo is making products that are beautifully designed, simple to use & user friendly.  We happen to make computers.  Want to buy one?

 

Counterpoint Tivo, which (until a recent court victory that tripled its stock price) appeared to be struggling.  

   

http://www.ted.com Simon Sinek presents a simple but powerful model for how leaders inspire action, starting with a golden circle and the question "Why?" 

 

Source here.


More about Deb's world is here:
Planning & Strategy Retreats 

Presentation Videos - Change Results
Deb's mothership: The REVELN website

 



Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
Robin Martin's comment, May 11, 2013 12:39 PM
Thanks Deb!
Rescooped by Roy Sheneman, PhD from UDL & ICT in education
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RSA Animate - The Divided Brain

In this new RSAnimate, renowned psychiatrist and writer Iain McGilchrist explains how our 'divided brain' has profoundly altered human behaviour, culture and society. 


Via Smaragda Papadopoulou
Roy Sheneman, PhD's insight:

Interesting perspective...

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