21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)...
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In routing around paralysis, researchers may have found an amazing way to treat it | #Exoskeleton #Robotics 

In routing around paralysis, researchers may have found an amazing way to treat it | #Exoskeleton #Robotics  | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it

After a year-long testing period, a bionic exoskeleton seems to be helping to strengthen the damaged neural connections that...

 

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After a year-long testing period, a bionic exoskeleton seems to be helping to strengthen the damaged neural connections that...

 

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This camera is so tiny it can be injected with a syringe | #3D #Research #Technology 

This camera is so tiny it can be injected with a syringe | #3D #Research #Technology  | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it

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Researchers at the University of Stuttgart in Germany have designed a micro-camera so small it can fit inside a syringe. The scientists believe that the new device can be used to explore areas of the body that cameras previously couldn't access, as well as surveillance devices and machines with "autonomous vision."

 

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Researchers at the University of Stuttgart in Germany have designed a micro-camera so small it can fit inside a syringe. The scientists believe that the new device can be used to explore areas of the body that cameras previously couldn't access, as well as surveillance devices and machines with "autonomous vision."

 

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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=3D

 

 

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This surgical system can stitch a grape back together | #Research #Robotics #Medicine 

The da Vinci Xi surgical system has 4 robotic arms controlled by surgeons to perform minimally invasive surgeries.

 

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The da Vinci Xi surgical system has 4 robotic arms controlled by surgeons to perform minimally invasive surgeries.

 

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MIT researchers invented an origami robot that will unfold in your stomach

MIT researchers invented an origami robot that will unfold in your stomach | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it

Researchers have invented an origami robot that, true to its name, unfolds in your stomach.


If that sounds gross to you, that's because it totally is, but it could be a game-changer in the medical community due to its ability to remove batteries from the human body, according to a paper recently presented at the International Conference on Robotics and Automation.

 

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Researchers have invented an origami robot that, true to its name, unfolds in your stomach.


If that sounds gross to you, that's because it totally is, but it could be a game-changer in the medical community due to its ability to remove batteries from the human body, according to a paper recently presented at the International Conference on Robotics and Automation.

 

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Who wields the knife? | #Robotics #Surgery #Medicine #Research 

Who wields the knife? | #Robotics #Surgery #Medicine #Research  | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
THEY don’t drink, they don’t get tired and they don’t go on strike. To hospital managers, the idea of robots operating on patients without human intervention is an attractive one. To patients, though, the crucial question is, “are they better than human surgeons?” Surgery is messy and complicated. A routine operation can become life-threatening in minutes.

Such considerations have meant that the role of robots in operating theatres has been limited until now to being little more than motorised, precision tools for surgeons to deploy—a far cry from the smart surgical pods and “med-bays” of science fiction. But a paper published this week in Science Translational Medicine, by Peter Kim of the Children’s National Health System in Washington, DC, and his colleagues, brings the idea of real robot surgeons, operating under only the lightest of human supervision, a step closer. Though not yet let loose on people, it has successfully stitched up the intestines of piglets.

 

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THEY don’t drink, they don’t get tired and they don’t go on strike. To hospital managers, the idea of robots operating on patients without human intervention is an attractive one. To patients, though, the crucial question is, “are they better than human surgeons?” Surgery is messy and complicated. A routine operation can become life-threatening in minutes.

Such considerations have meant that the role of robots in operating theatres has been limited until now to being little more than motorised, precision tools for surgeons to deploy—a far cry from the smart surgical pods and “med-bays” of science fiction. But a paper published this week in Science Translational Medicine, by Peter Kim of the Children’s National Health System in Washington, DC, and his colleagues, brings the idea of real robot surgeons, operating under only the lightest of human supervision, a step closer. Though not yet let loose on people, it has successfully stitched up the intestines of piglets.

 

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3D printing BioPen lets surgeons draw with stem cells | #Research #Medicine 

3D printing BioPen lets surgeons draw with stem cells | #Research #Medicine  | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
Doctors perform hundreds of thousands of knee surgeries every year, often to replace damaged or worn cartilage. The techniques for performing these surgeries today may be about to change, thanks to new research. 

In the not-too-distant future, orthopedic surgeons may simply draw new cartilage inside your knee, using a 3D printing, stem-cell-extruding device called the "BioPen."

SEE ALSO: Should we 3D print a new Palmyra? Here's what it means to recreate a city destroyed by ISIS.

The device is still in the research and development stage and not yet approved for medical use, but it's an example of how 3D printing technologies may usher in new ways of treating common human ailments.

In a study published last month in the journal Biofabrication, scientists from the Australian Research Council’s Center of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) detailed experiments with their custom-built, 3D printing pen, known as the BioPen, a device they’ve been working for almost three years. 

Its new capability, though, is what they're calling a breakthrough: the ability to effectively print viable human stem cells into damaged joints to regrow cartilage.

The pen was developed by Peter Choong, director of orthopedic

 

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Doctors perform hundreds of thousands of knee surgeries every year, often to replace damaged or worn cartilage. The techniques for performing these surgeries today may be about to change, thanks to new research. 

In the not-too-distant future, orthopedic surgeons may simply draw new cartilage inside your knee, using a 3D printing, stem-cell-extruding device called the "BioPen."

SEE ALSO: Should we 3D print a new Palmyra? Here's what it means to recreate a city destroyed by ISIS.

The device is still in the research and development stage and not yet approved for medical use, but it's an example of how 3D printing technologies may usher in new ways of treating common human ailments.

In a study published last month in the journal Biofabrication, scientists from the Australian Research Council’s Center of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) detailed experiments with their custom-built, 3D printing pen, known as the BioPen, a device they’ve been working for almost three years. 

Its new capability, though, is what they're calling a breakthrough: the ability to effectively print viable human stem cells into damaged joints to regrow cartilage.

The pen was developed by Peter Choong, director of orthopedic

 

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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=3D

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=3D-Printing

 

 

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Nanoparticle-based cancer therapies shown to work in humans | #Research #Medicine

Nanoparticle-based cancer therapies shown to work in humans | #Research #Medicine | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
Nanoparticle-based cancer therapies shown to work in humans

(Nanowerk News) A team of researchers led by Caltech scientists has shown that nanoparticles can function to target tumors while avoiding adjacent healthy tissue in human cancer patients.
"Our work shows that this specificity, as previously demonstrated in preclinical animal studies, can in fact occur in humans," says study leader Mark E. Davis, the Warren and Katharine Schlinger Professor of Chemical Engineering at Caltech. "The ability to target tumors is one of the primary reasons for using nanoparticles as therapeutics to treat solid tumors."

 

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Nanoparticle-based cancer therapies shown to work in humans

(Nanowerk News) A team of researchers led by Caltech scientists has shown that nanoparticles can function to target tumors while avoiding adjacent healthy tissue in human cancer patients.
"Our work shows that this specificity, as previously demonstrated in preclinical animal studies, can in fact occur in humans," says study leader Mark E. Davis, the Warren and Katharine Schlinger Professor of Chemical Engineering at Caltech. "The ability to target tumors is one of the primary reasons for using nanoparticles as therapeutics to treat solid tumors."

 

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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Cancer

 

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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, March 30, 2:56 AM
Nanoparticle-based cancer therapies shown to work in humans

(Nanowerk News) A team of researchers led by Caltech scientists has shown that nanoparticles can function to target tumors while avoiding adjacent healthy tissue in human cancer patients.
"Our work shows that this specificity, as previously demonstrated in preclinical animal studies, can in fact occur in humans," says study leader Mark E. Davis, the Warren and Katharine Schlinger Professor of Chemical Engineering at Caltech. "The ability to target tumors is one of the primary reasons for using nanoparticles as therapeutics to treat solid tumors."

 

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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Cancer

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Nano

 

 

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, March 31, 5:24 PM
Nanoparticle-based cancer therapies shown to work in humans

(Nanowerk News) A team of researchers led by Caltech scientists has shown that nanoparticles can function to target tumors while avoiding adjacent healthy tissue in human cancer patients.
"Our work shows that this specificity, as previously demonstrated in preclinical animal studies, can in fact occur in humans," says study leader Mark E. Davis, the Warren and Katharine Schlinger Professor of Chemical Engineering at Caltech. "The ability to target tumors is one of the primary reasons for using nanoparticles as therapeutics to treat solid tumors."

 

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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Cancer

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Nano

 

 

Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, April 2, 7:03 AM
Nanoparticle-based cancer therapies shown to work in humans

(Nanowerk News) A team of researchers led by Caltech scientists has shown that nanoparticles can function to target tumors while avoiding adjacent healthy tissue in human cancer patients.
"Our work shows that this specificity, as previously demonstrated in preclinical animal studies, can in fact occur in humans," says study leader Mark E. Davis, the Warren and Katharine Schlinger Professor of Chemical Engineering at Caltech. "The ability to target tumors is one of the primary reasons for using nanoparticles as therapeutics to treat solid tumors."

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Cancer

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Nano

 

 

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Graphene patch monitors blood glucose and auto-injects treatment | #Research #Medicine

Graphene patch monitors blood glucose and auto-injects treatment | #Research #Medicine | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
If you were sitting around worrying that graphene might not be able to live up to its potential in electrochemical bio-sensing (and that has to be at least half of you), then worry no more: All we have to do to make graphene practical for every-day use is mix it with gold! By employing just a tiny amount of the precious metal to offset some of graphene’s least helpful properties, it turns out that we might be able to fully exploit its best ones. A new study published in Nature Nanotechnology uses this hybrid to create a flexible skin patch to monitor blood glucose and, more importantly, automatically administer drugs as needed.

 

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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Graphene

 

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If you were sitting around worrying that graphene might not be able to live up to its potential in electrochemical bio-sensing (and that has to be at least half of you), then worry no more: All we have to do to make graphene practical for every-day use is mix it with gold! By employing just a tiny amount of the precious metal to offset some of graphene’s least helpful properties, it turns out that we might be able to fully exploit its best ones. A new study published in Nature Nanotechnology uses this hybrid to create a flexible skin patch to monitor blood glucose and, more importantly, automatically administer drugs as needed.

 

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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Graphene

 

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Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, April 2, 7:03 AM
If you were sitting around worrying that graphene might not be able to live up to its potential in electrochemical bio-sensing (and that has to be at least half of you), then worry no more: All we have to do to make graphene practical for every-day use is mix it with gold! By employing just a tiny amount of the precious metal to offset some of graphene’s least helpful properties, it turns out that we might be able to fully exploit its best ones. A new study published in Nature Nanotechnology uses this hybrid to create a flexible skin patch to monitor blood glucose and, more importantly, automatically administer drugs as needed.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Graphene