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Microsoft is buying tiny strands of DNA to store big data

Microsoft is buying tiny strands of DNA to store big data | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
Microsoft has partnered with a San Francisco-based company to encode information on synthetic DNA to test its potential as a new medium for data storage. 

Twist Bioscience will provide Microsoft with 10 million DNA strands for the purpose of encoding digital data. In other words, Microsoft is trying to figure out how the same molecules that make up humans' genetic code can be used to encode digital information. 

While a commercial product is still years away, initial tests have shown that it's possible to encode and recover 100 percent of digital data from synthetic DNA, said Doug Carmean, a Microsoft partner architect, in a statement.

Using DNA could allow massive amounts of data to be stored in a tiny physical footprint. Twist claims a gram of DNA could store almost a trillion gigabytes of data.

Finding new ways to store information is increasingly important as people generate more and more data in their daily lives, and as millions of connected IoT sensors start to come online.

 

Gust MEES's insight:
Microsoft has partnered with a San Francisco-based company to encode information on synthetic DNA to test its potential as a new medium for data storage. 

Twist Bioscience will provide Microsoft with 10 million DNA strands for the purpose of encoding digital data. In other words, Microsoft is trying to figure out how the same molecules that make up humans' genetic code can be used to encode digital information. 

While a commercial product is still years away, initial tests have shown that it's possible to encode and recover 100 percent of digital data from synthetic DNA, said Doug Carmean, a Microsoft partner architect, in a statement.

Using DNA could allow massive amounts of data to be stored in a tiny physical footprint. Twist claims a gram of DNA could store almost a trillion gigabytes of data.

Finding new ways to store information is increasingly important as people generate more and more data in their daily lives, and as millions of connected IoT sensors start to come online.

 

 

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Top 3 Nano technology

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​Engineering breakthrough may lead to batteries that never die | #Research #Technology #Nano 

​Engineering breakthrough may lead to batteries that never die | #Research #Technology #Nano  | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
University of California, Irvine researchers recently invented nanowire-based battery material that can be recharged not hundreds of times but hundreds of thousands of times. Dare we say it? These batteries might last practically forever.

 

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University of California, Irvine researchers recently invented nanowire-based battery material that can be recharged not hundreds of times but hundreds of thousands of times. Dare we say it? These batteries might last practically forever.

 

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For the first time ever, a human with paralysis can move his hands again | #Research 

For the first time ever, a human with paralysis can move his hands again | #Research  | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
Behind the groundbreaking tech that changed a 24-year-old quadriplegic's life.

 

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Behind the groundbreaking tech that changed a 24-year-old quadriplegic's life.

 

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Teagan M's curator insight, April 14, 2:10 PM
Scoop it Blog on: For the first time ever, a human with paralysis can move his hand againDate: April 14Link:My summary: this article was about how a guy who suffers with paralysis in his hands is given the chance to move his hands again with help of technology that takes signals from his brain to his Muscles in his hands and arms so that they can move and function like they used to. It also says that this new technology may not be distributed to the public for a very long time Because it's still being tested. There has been only 1 person to use it so far and it's been successful for almost 2 years. I think that this new technology for helping paralysis is a good idea Because it can help people who are trying to get back to work and it would allow them to carry on with their life without struggles that paralysis has. It would be a great idea to bring this to the public so they can have their opinions as well and have better ideas that can go with it so it can advance even more. It may be hard to get it going, like it said In the article because so far only one person has successfully used it, but once it's released I'm sure it will bring huge benefits to those who need it and people who want to bring new ideas.
Sadie's curator insight, April 14, 2:11 PM
Thursday, April 14th BY CHELSEA HARVEY This article is about a man who had paralysis from a swimming accident. He was the first man to test the new technology and he cured his hand, he is able to move them again. I think this was a really interesting article and it's amazing how they found the technology to cure his hand and hopefully cure the rest of the people with paralysis and keep making miracles happen.
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3D printing BioPen lets surgeons draw with stem cells | #Research #Medicine 

3D printing BioPen lets surgeons draw with stem cells | #Research #Medicine  | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
Doctors perform hundreds of thousands of knee surgeries every year, often to replace damaged or worn cartilage. The techniques for performing these surgeries today may be about to change, thanks to new research. 

In the not-too-distant future, orthopedic surgeons may simply draw new cartilage inside your knee, using a 3D printing, stem-cell-extruding device called the "BioPen."

SEE ALSO: Should we 3D print a new Palmyra? Here's what it means to recreate a city destroyed by ISIS.

The device is still in the research and development stage and not yet approved for medical use, but it's an example of how 3D printing technologies may usher in new ways of treating common human ailments.

In a study published last month in the journal Biofabrication, scientists from the Australian Research Council’s Center of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) detailed experiments with their custom-built, 3D printing pen, known as the BioPen, a device they’ve been working for almost three years. 

Its new capability, though, is what they're calling a breakthrough: the ability to effectively print viable human stem cells into damaged joints to regrow cartilage.

The pen was developed by Peter Choong, director of orthopedic

 

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Doctors perform hundreds of thousands of knee surgeries every year, often to replace damaged or worn cartilage. The techniques for performing these surgeries today may be about to change, thanks to new research. 

In the not-too-distant future, orthopedic surgeons may simply draw new cartilage inside your knee, using a 3D printing, stem-cell-extruding device called the "BioPen."

SEE ALSO: Should we 3D print a new Palmyra? Here's what it means to recreate a city destroyed by ISIS.

The device is still in the research and development stage and not yet approved for medical use, but it's an example of how 3D printing technologies may usher in new ways of treating common human ailments.

In a study published last month in the journal Biofabrication, scientists from the Australian Research Council’s Center of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) detailed experiments with their custom-built, 3D printing pen, known as the BioPen, a device they’ve been working for almost three years. 

Its new capability, though, is what they're calling a breakthrough: the ability to effectively print viable human stem cells into damaged joints to regrow cartilage.

The pen was developed by Peter Choong, director of orthopedic

 

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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=3D

 

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Second quantum revolution a reality with chip-based atomic physics

Second quantum revolution a reality with chip-based atomic physics | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
Second quantum revolution a reality with chip-based atomic physics

 

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Second quantum revolution a reality with chip-based atomic physics

 

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Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, April 2, 12:03 PM
Second quantum revolution a reality with chip-based atomic physics

 

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Nanoparticle-based cancer therapies shown to work in humans | #Research #Medicine

Nanoparticle-based cancer therapies shown to work in humans | #Research #Medicine | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
Nanoparticle-based cancer therapies shown to work in humans

(Nanowerk News) A team of researchers led by Caltech scientists has shown that nanoparticles can function to target tumors while avoiding adjacent healthy tissue in human cancer patients.
"Our work shows that this specificity, as previously demonstrated in preclinical animal studies, can in fact occur in humans," says study leader Mark E. Davis, the Warren and Katharine Schlinger Professor of Chemical Engineering at Caltech. "The ability to target tumors is one of the primary reasons for using nanoparticles as therapeutics to treat solid tumors."

 

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Nanoparticle-based cancer therapies shown to work in humans

(Nanowerk News) A team of researchers led by Caltech scientists has shown that nanoparticles can function to target tumors while avoiding adjacent healthy tissue in human cancer patients.
"Our work shows that this specificity, as previously demonstrated in preclinical animal studies, can in fact occur in humans," says study leader Mark E. Davis, the Warren and Katharine Schlinger Professor of Chemical Engineering at Caltech. "The ability to target tumors is one of the primary reasons for using nanoparticles as therapeutics to treat solid tumors."

 

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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, March 30, 7:56 AM
Nanoparticle-based cancer therapies shown to work in humans

(Nanowerk News) A team of researchers led by Caltech scientists has shown that nanoparticles can function to target tumors while avoiding adjacent healthy tissue in human cancer patients.
"Our work shows that this specificity, as previously demonstrated in preclinical animal studies, can in fact occur in humans," says study leader Mark E. Davis, the Warren and Katharine Schlinger Professor of Chemical Engineering at Caltech. "The ability to target tumors is one of the primary reasons for using nanoparticles as therapeutics to treat solid tumors."

 

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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Cancer

 

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, March 31, 10:24 PM
Nanoparticle-based cancer therapies shown to work in humans

(Nanowerk News) A team of researchers led by Caltech scientists has shown that nanoparticles can function to target tumors while avoiding adjacent healthy tissue in human cancer patients.
"Our work shows that this specificity, as previously demonstrated in preclinical animal studies, can in fact occur in humans," says study leader Mark E. Davis, the Warren and Katharine Schlinger Professor of Chemical Engineering at Caltech. "The ability to target tumors is one of the primary reasons for using nanoparticles as therapeutics to treat solid tumors."

 

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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Cancer

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Nano

 

 

Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, April 2, 12:03 PM
Nanoparticle-based cancer therapies shown to work in humans

(Nanowerk News) A team of researchers led by Caltech scientists has shown that nanoparticles can function to target tumors while avoiding adjacent healthy tissue in human cancer patients.
"Our work shows that this specificity, as previously demonstrated in preclinical animal studies, can in fact occur in humans," says study leader Mark E. Davis, the Warren and Katharine Schlinger Professor of Chemical Engineering at Caltech. "The ability to target tumors is one of the primary reasons for using nanoparticles as therapeutics to treat solid tumors."

 

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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Cancer

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Nano

 

 

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Quantum computing is now a big step closer thanks to a new breakthrough: the Fredkin gate

Quantum computing is now a big step closer thanks to a new breakthrough: the Fredkin gate | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
Quantum computing is now within closer reach thanks to a major breakthrough in which scientists have demonstrated that a key building block can be assembled.

Quantum computers are based on atomic-scale quantum bits, or qubits, that can represent both 0 and 1 simultaneously, and they are expected to deliver huge performance gains over traditional computers. Realizing that potential, however, depends on the ability to build working quantum circuits.

That's where the Fredkin gate, also known as a controlled-SWAP gate, comes in. The quantum version of the classic Fredkin gate exchanges two qubits depending on the value of the third. It could be a key component of quantum circuitry, but because of the complexity involved, no one has ever managed to build one in the real world -- until now.

Whereas the Fredkin gate typically requires a circuit of five logic operations, researchers from Griffith University and the University of Queensland used the quantum entanglement of particles of light to implement the controlled-SWAP operation directly.

“Similar to building a huge wall out of lots of small bricks, large quantum circuits require very many logic gates to function," explained Raj Patel, a research fellow in Griffith's Center for Quantum Dynamics. "However, if larger bricks are used, the same wall could be built with far fewer bricks.”

 

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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Quantum-Computing

 

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Quantum computing is now within closer reach thanks to a major breakthrough in which scientists have demonstrated that a key building block can be assembled.

Quantum computers are based on atomic-scale quantum bits, or qubits, that can represent both 0 and 1 simultaneously, and they are expected to deliver huge performance gains over traditional computers. Realizing that potential, however, depends on the ability to build working quantum circuits.

That's where the Fredkin gate, also known as a controlled-SWAP gate, comes in. The quantum version of the classic Fredkin gate exchanges two qubits depending on the value of the third. It could be a key component of quantum circuitry, but because of the complexity involved, no one has ever managed to build one in the real world -- until now.

Whereas the Fredkin gate typically requires a circuit of five logic operations, researchers from Griffith University and the University of Queensland used the quantum entanglement of particles of light to implement the controlled-SWAP operation directly.

“Similar to building a huge wall out of lots of small bricks, large quantum circuits require very many logic gates to function," explained Raj Patel, a research fellow in Griffith's Center for Quantum Dynamics. "However, if larger bricks are used, the same wall could be built with far fewer bricks.”

 

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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Quantum-Computing

 

 

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CineversityTV's curator insight, March 29, 6:39 PM
Quantum computing is now within closer reach thanks to a major breakthrough in which scientists have demonstrated that a key building block can be assembled.

Quantum computers are based on atomic-scale quantum bits, or qubits, that can represent both 0 and 1 simultaneously, and they are expected to deliver huge performance gains over traditional computers. Realizing that potential, however, depends on the ability to build working quantum circuits.

That's where the Fredkin gate, also known as a controlled-SWAP gate, comes in. The quantum version of the classic Fredkin gate exchanges two qubits depending on the value of the third. It could be a key component of quantum circuitry, but because of the complexity involved, no one has ever managed to build one in the real world -- until now.

Whereas the Fredkin gate typically requires a circuit of five logic operations, researchers from Griffith University and the University of Queensland used the quantum entanglement of particles of light to implement the controlled-SWAP operation directly.

“Similar to building a huge wall out of lots of small bricks, large quantum circuits require very many logic gates to function," explained Raj Patel, a research fellow in Griffith's Center for Quantum Dynamics. "However, if larger bricks are used, the same wall could be built with far fewer bricks.”

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Quantum-Computing

 

 

Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, April 2, 12:03 PM
Quantum computing is now within closer reach thanks to a major breakthrough in which scientists have demonstrated that a key building block can be assembled.

Quantum computers are based on atomic-scale quantum bits, or qubits, that can represent both 0 and 1 simultaneously, and they are expected to deliver huge performance gains over traditional computers. Realizing that potential, however, depends on the ability to build working quantum circuits.

That's where the Fredkin gate, also known as a controlled-SWAP gate, comes in. The quantum version of the classic Fredkin gate exchanges two qubits depending on the value of the third. It could be a key component of quantum circuitry, but because of the complexity involved, no one has ever managed to build one in the real world -- until now.

Whereas the Fredkin gate typically requires a circuit of five logic operations, researchers from Griffith University and the University of Queensland used the quantum entanglement of particles of light to implement the controlled-SWAP operation directly.

“Similar to building a huge wall out of lots of small bricks, large quantum circuits require very many logic gates to function," explained Raj Patel, a research fellow in Griffith's Center for Quantum Dynamics. "However, if larger bricks are used, the same wall could be built with far fewer bricks.”

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Quantum-Computing

 

 

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Researchers are brewing up medicines from beer hops

Researchers are brewing up medicines from beer hops | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
While beer connoisseurs have mixed and heated opinions about the trend of ever-more hoppy beers, some researchers just can’t get enough of the bitter buds.

Their keen interest stems from the potentially untapped medicinal properties of the flowers. Traditional medicine has long used hops for everything from sedation to combatting infections. And researchers have noted that the plant’s chemical constituents appear to have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and anti-cancer activities. Yet chemists are still working out all the chemicals responsible for the potentially therapeutic effects and how to use them to brew up new medicines.

Now, with two new studies, researchers report that they’re getting closer to pinning down and optimizing hop-based medicines.

In one study, appearing in the Journal of Natural Products, a team of Italian researchers identified three previously unknown chemicals from Cascade hops—which are used in many American brews, but perhaps notably as a finishing hop in Sierra Nevada’s Pale Ale. One of the chemicals has clear anti-inflammatory properties.

 

Gust MEES's insight:

While beer connoisseurs have mixed and heated opinions about the trend of ever-more hoppy beers, some researchers just can’t get enough of the bitter buds.

Their keen interest stems from the potentially untapped medicinal properties of the flowers. Traditional medicine has long used hops for everything from sedation to combatting infections. And researchers have noted that the plant’s chemical constituents appear to have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and anti-cancer activities. Yet chemists are still working out all the chemicals responsible for the potentially therapeutic effects and how to use them to brew up new medicines.

Now, with two new studies, researchers report that they’re getting closer to pinning down and optimizing hop-based medicines.

In one study, appearing in the Journal of Natural Products, a team of Italian researchers identified three previously unknown chemicals from Cascade hops—which are used in many American brews, but perhaps notably as a finishing hop in Sierra Nevada’s Pale Ale. One of the chemicals has clear anti-inflammatory properties.

 

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Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, March 23, 12:24 PM

While beer connoisseurs have mixed and heated opinions about the trend of ever-more hoppy beers, some researchers just can’t get enough of the bitter buds.

Their keen interest stems from the potentially untapped medicinal properties of the flowers. Traditional medicine has long used hops for everything from sedation to combatting infections. And researchers have noted that the plant’s chemical constituents appear to have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and anti-cancer activities. Yet chemists are still working out all the chemicals responsible for the potentially therapeutic effects and how to use them to brew up new medicines.

Now, with two new studies, researchers report that they’re getting closer to pinning down and optimizing hop-based medicines.

In one study, appearing in the Journal of Natural Products, a team of Italian researchers identified three previously unknown chemicals from Cascade hops—which are used in many American brews, but perhaps notably as a finishing hop in Sierra Nevada’s Pale Ale. One of the chemicals has clear anti-inflammatory properties.

 

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Functional human heart tissue grown from skin cells | Research

Functional human heart tissue grown from skin cells | Research | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
The need for heart transplants will always exceed the number of donor hearts available for transplant. Thanks to research just out from Massachusetts General Hospital, though, this may not continue to be a problem for much longer. Researchers there have just succeeded in growing fully contractile heart tissue by recellularizing a collagen scaffold, and they’re hoping to refine the method so that it can be used as a “functional myocardial patch” for cardiac injuries.
Gust MEES's insight:

The need for heart transplants will always exceed the number of donor hearts available for transplant. Thanks to research just out from Massachusetts General Hospital, though, this may not continue to be a problem for much longer. Researchers there have just succeeded in growing fully contractile heart tissue by recellularizing a collagen scaffold, and they’re hoping to refine the method so that it can be used as a “functional myocardial patch” for cardiac injuries.

 

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Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, March 16, 11:20 AM

The need for heart transplants will always exceed the number of donor hearts available for transplant. Thanks to research just out from Massachusetts General Hospital, though, this may not continue to be a problem for much longer. Researchers there have just succeeded in growing fully contractile heart tissue by recellularizing a collagen scaffold, and they’re hoping to refine the method so that it can be used as a “functional myocardial patch” for cardiac injuries.

 

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, March 31, 10:25 PM

The need for heart transplants will always exceed the number of donor hearts available for transplant. Thanks to research just out from Massachusetts General Hospital, though, this may not continue to be a problem for much longer. Researchers there have just succeeded in growing fully contractile heart tissue by recellularizing a collagen scaffold, and they’re hoping to refine the method so that it can be used as a “functional myocardial patch” for cardiac injuries.

 

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The SkyWall 100 bazooka captures drones with a giant net

The SkyWall 100 bazooka captures drones with a giant net | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
The SkyWall 100 is one of the latest device promising to protect the world from the impending drone takeover. It's essentially a smart bazooka that fires a..

 

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The SkyWall 100 is one of the latest device promising to protect the world from the impending drone takeover. It's essentially a smart bazooka that fires a..

 

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Paul M. Fenn's curator insight, March 8, 7:49 PM

The SkyWall 100 is one of the latest device promising to protect the world from the impending drone takeover. It's essentially a smart bazooka that fires a..

 

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Man has 3D-printed vertebrae implanted in world-first surgery

Man has 3D-printed vertebrae implanted in world-first surgery | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
While we still don't have a 3D printer in every home, use of the technology in medicine is becoming increasingly vital. 3D-printed implants made to perfectly fit the patient have a significant medical benefit, as one Australian doctor has demonstrated.

In late 2015, Ralph Mobbs, a neurosurgeon at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Sydney, met a patient who suffered from a virulent form of cancer known as chordoma.

SEE ALSO: Scientists are getting closer to 3D printing you a new ear if you lose one

The patient, who is in his 60s, had a tumour in a particularly hard-to-get-to location, Mobbs told Mashable Australia. "At the top of the neck, there are two highly-specialised vertebrae that are involved in the flexion and rotation of the head. This tumour had occupied those two vertebrae," he said.

Without treatment, the tumour can slowly compress the brain stem and spinal chord, causing quadriplegia. "It's a particularly horrible way to go," Mobbs said.


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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=3D


Gust MEES's insight:
While we still don't have a 3D printer in every home, use of the technology in medicine is becoming increasingly vital. 3D-printed implants made to perfectly fit the patient have a significant medical benefit, as one Australian doctor has demonstrated.

In late 2015, Ralph Mobbs, a neurosurgeon at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Sydney, met a patient who suffered from a virulent form of cancer known as chordoma.

SEE ALSO: Scientists are getting closer to 3D printing you a new ear if you lose one

The patient, who is in his 60s, had a tumour in a particularly hard-to-get-to location, Mobbs told Mashable Australia. "At the top of the neck, there are two highly-specialised vertebrae that are involved in the flexion and rotation of the head. This tumour had occupied those two vertebrae," he said.

Without treatment, the tumour can slowly compress the brain stem and spinal chord, causing quadriplegia. "It's a particularly horrible way to go," Mobbs said.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=3D


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Mattel Unveils ThingMaker, A $300 3D Printer That Lets Kids Make Their Own Toys

Mattel Unveils ThingMaker, A $300 3D Printer That Lets Kids Make Their Own Toys | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
At New York’s Toy Fair trade show over the weekend, Mattel unveiled its new, $300 3D Printer, the “ThingMaker,” which will allow children to print their own toys at home. The device works in conjunction with a 3D printing app developed in collaboration with Autodesk that offers a simple interface for designing items that can then come to life via Mattel’s ThingMaker as well as with other standard 3D printers already on the market.

The accompanying app is actually key to making Mattel’s 3D printing experience more accessible to a wider audience.

While there are affordably priced 3D printers available today, the software that works with them can sometimes have a learning curve that can hinder adoption. With the new application, live now on iOS and Android, the goal was to make it easy enough for anyone to design their own toys – even younger children.
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