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Why cybercriminals want your personal data

Why cybercriminals want your personal data | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
Over the past few years, the personal data theft landscape has changed as online behaviors and activities evolve.

 

To better understand this crime, it helps to understand what personal data is worth to an identity thief. The average identity thief doesn’t steal data to use for him or herself. In most cases, they take the personal information and sell it on the online black market. It can be surprising what an individual’s personal information is worth.

Based off of what we’ve seen at CSID, a credit card number, name and date of birth can sell for $13. A Social Security Number can go for $20. A bank account with a balance of $10,000 goes for an average cost of $625. Even the value of a person’s social media account has worth. According to RSA, 10,000 followers on Twitter sell for $15. 1,000 likes on Facebook sell for $15.


Gust MEES's insight:

 

Based off of what we’ve seen at CSID, a credit card number, name and date of birth can sell for $13. A Social Security Number can go for $20. A bank account with a balance of $10,000 goes for an average cost of $625. Even the value of a person’s social media account has worth. According to RSA, 10,000 followers on Twitter sell for $15. 1,000 likes on Facebook sell for $15.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Cybercrime...

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 12, 2013 10:08 AM

 

Based off of what we’ve seen at CSID, a credit card number, name and date of birth can sell for $13. A Social Security Number can go for $20. A bank account with a balance of $10,000 goes for an average cost of $625. Even the value of a person’s social media account has worth. According to RSA, 10,000 followers on Twitter sell for $15. 1,000 likes on Facebook sell for $15.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Cybercrime...

 

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Credit card has built-in keyboard

Credit card has built-in keyboard | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
A credit card with a built-in LCD screen and keyboard is announced by Mastercard in an effort to simplify secure online banking.

 

Read more:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20250441

 

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Les cyber-risques, tout le monde en parle enfin !

Les cyber-risques, tout le monde en parle enfin ! | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it

La médiatisation a néanmoins favorisé la prise de conscience des dangers liés à ces nouvelles technologies et l'émergence de solutions.

 

Il est désormais possible de faire surveiller son réseau informatique comme on fait surveiller ses locaux et d'intervenir en temps réel pour se protéger des malveillances détectées. Il est également devenu possible de s'assurer contre les conséquences financières de ces intrusions et malveillances.

 

Plusieurs assureurs proposent depuis peu des contrats spécifiques pour garantir les cyber-risques.

 

Cependant tant la nature des garanties, que leur montant et les primes sont très dépendants du niveau de prévention mis en place par l'entreprise.

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NSA Reportedly Broke Privacy Rules Thousands Of Times Per Year

NSA Reportedly Broke Privacy Rules Thousands Of Times Per Year | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON -- The National Security Agency has broken privacy rules or overstepped its legal authority thousands of times each year since Congress granted the agency broad new powers in 2008, The Washington Post reported Thursday.

 

Most of the infractions involve unauthorized surveillance of Americans or foreign intelligence targets in the United States, both of which are restricted by law and executive order.


They range from significant violations of law to typographical errors that resulted in unintended interception of U.S. emails and telephone calls, the Post said, citing an internal audit and other top-secret documents provided it earlier this summer from NSA leaker Edward Snowden, a former systems analyst with the agency.


Gust MEES's insight:

 

===> In most cases, the NSA was involved in unauthorized surveillance of Americans or foreign intelligence targets in the U.S., despite these being restricted by law and executive order. <===

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=PRISM

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 15, 2013 10:21 PM

 

===> In most cases, the NSA was involved in unauthorized surveillance of Americans or foreign intelligence targets in the U.S., despite these being restricted by law and executive order. <===

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=PRISM

 

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Cybersecurity Experts Investigate Self-adapting Network that Defends against Hackers

Cybersecurity Experts Investigate Self-adapting Network that Defends against Hackers | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
In the online struggle for network security, Kansas State University cybersecurity experts are adding an ally to the security force: the computer network itself...

 

In the online struggle for network security, Kansas State University cybersecurity experts are adding an ally to the security force: the computer network itself...

 

As the study progresses, the computer scientists will develop a set of analytical models to determine the effectiveness of a moving-target defense system. They also will create a proof-of-concept system as a way to experiment with the idea in a concrete setting.

"It's important to investigate any scientific evidence that shows that this approach does work so it can be fully researched and developed," DeLoach said. He started collaborating with Ou to apply intelligent adaptive techniques to cybersecurity several years ago after a conversation at a university open house.

 

Read more: http://www.scientificcomputing.com/news-HPC-Cybersecurity-Experts-Investigate-Self-adapting-Network-that-Defends-against-Hackers-051512.aspx

 

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