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NASA: West Antarctic Melt Rate Has Tripled

NASA: West Antarctic Melt Rate Has Tripled | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it

A comprehensive, 21-year analysis of the fastest-melting region of Antarctica has found that the melt rate of glaciers there has tripled during the last decade. 


The glaciers in the Amundsen Sea Embayment in West Antarctica are hemorrhaging ice faster than any other part of Antarctica and are the most significant Antarctic contributors to sea level rise. This study by scientists at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and NASA is the first to evaluate and reconcile observations from four different measurement techniques to produce an authoritative estimate of the amount and the rate of loss over the last two decades.


"The mass loss of these glaciers is increasing at an amazing rate," said scientist Isabella Velicogna, jointly of UCI and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. Velicogna is a coauthor of a paper on the results, which has been accepted for publication in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.


Lead author Tyler Sutterley, a doctoral candidate at UCI, and his team did the analysis to verify that the melting in this part of Antarctica is shifting into high gear. "Previous studies had suggested that this region is starting to change very dramatically since the 1990s, and we wanted to see how all the different techniques compared," Sutterley said. "The remarkable agreement among the techniques gave us confidence that we are getting this right."


The researchers reconciled measurements of the mass balance of glaciers flowing into the Amundsen Sea Embayment. Mass balance is a measure of how much ice the glaciers gain and lose over time from accumulating or melting snow, discharges of ice as icebergs, and other causes. Measurements from all four techniques were available from 2003 to 2009. Combined, the four data sets span the years 1992 to 2013.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Gust MEES's insight:

A comprehensive, 21-year analysis of the fastest-melting region of Antarctica has found that the melt rate of glaciers there has tripled during the last decade. 


The glaciers in the Amundsen Sea Embayment in West Antarctica are hemorrhaging ice faster than any other part of Antarctica and are the most significant Antarctic contributors to sea level rise. This study by scientists at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and NASA is the first to evaluate and reconcile observations from four different measurement techniques to produce an authoritative estimate of the amount and the rate of loss over the last two decades.


"The mass loss of these glaciers is increasing at an amazing rate," said scientist Isabella Velicogna, jointly of UCI and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. Velicogna is a coauthor of a paper on the results, which has been accepted for publication in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.


Lead author Tyler Sutterley, a doctoral candidate at UCI, and his team did the analysis to verify that the melting in this part of Antarctica is shifting into high gear. "Previous studies had suggested that this region is starting to change very dramatically since the 1990s, and we wanted to see how all the different techniques compared," Sutterley said. "The remarkable agreement among the techniques gave us confidence that we are getting this right."


The researchers reconciled measurements of the mass balance of glaciers flowing into the Amundsen Sea Embayment. Mass balance is a measure of how much ice the glaciers gain and lose over time from accumulating or melting snow, discharges of ice as icebergs, and other causes. Measurements from all four techniques were available from 2003 to 2009. Combined, the four data sets span the years 1992 to 2013.

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La fonte de glaciers de l'Ouest de l'Antarctique « a atteint un point de non-retour »

La fonte de glaciers de l'Ouest de l'Antarctique « a atteint un point de non-retour » | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
Deux études affirment que la fonte des grands glaciers de la région, qui contiennent assez d'eau pour faire monter les océans d'un mètre, s'accélère.


En savoir plus :


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Antarctic


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En savoir plus :


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Antarctic


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Record sea ice around Antarctica due to global warming - environment - 17 September 2014 - New Scientist

Record sea ice around Antarctica due to global warming - environment - 17 September 2014 - New Scientist | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it

The extent of Antarctica's sea ice has hit yet another record high, and counter-intuitively global warming is responsible...

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The extent of Antarctica's sea ice has hit yet another record high, and counter-intuitively global warming is responsible...


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NASA on Alert as Giant Iceberg Breaks Off into Antarctica

NASA on Alert as Giant Iceberg Breaks Off into Antarctica | 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)... | Scoop.it
Its feared that the mammoth iceberg could contribute to rising sea levels.
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Its feared that the mammoth iceberg could contribute to rising sea levels.

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