21st Century Information Fluency
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21st Century Information Fluency
21CIF: Locate, Evaluate and Ethically use Digital information: Co Curators: Dennis O'Connor & Carl Heine
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Jonathan Stray » The editorial search engine

Jonathan Stray » The editorial search engine | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

It’s impossible to build a computer system that helps people find or filter information without at some point making editorial judgements. That’s because search and collaborative filtering algorithms embody human judgement about what is important to know. I’ve been pointing this out for years, and it seems particularly relevant to the journalism profession today as it grapples with the digital medium. It’s this observation which is the bridge between the front page and the search results page, and it suggests a new generation of digital news products that are far more useful than just online translations of a newspaper.

Dennis T OConnor's insight:

Thoughts on journalism, research, learning and curation...

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Seriously Amazing - Questions Come Alive at the Smithsonian!

Seriously Amazing - Questions Come Alive at the Smithsonian! | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
The Smithsonian asks and answers questions about science, art, history and culture, exciting the learning in everyone, every day.

The Smithsonian has recently launched a new website seriouslyamazing.com which “poses questions and answers to show people how it can be an exciting resource for discovery and learning.”

They have created " seven quirky characthers to symbolize the questions the Smithsonian asks and answers every day:

* The Wild represents the diversity of the animal kingdom
* The Mash-Up stands for the ways people share culture
* The Green reflects the wonder of the natural landscape
* The New is where technology and creativity collide
* The Masterpiece embodies artistic expression
* The Storyteller is about America, its people and the tales they tell
* The Discoverer explores our world and the universe

Take some time to explore this site. You may discover many new resources available at the Smithonian!


Via Beth Dichter, Gordon Dahlby
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The extended mind – how Google affects our memories | Not Exactly Rocket Science | Discover Magazine

The extended mind – how Google affects our memories | Not Exactly Rocket Science | Discover Magazine | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
Memory | Information has never been easier to find or record.


Now, three psychologists have shown how our memories might react to this omnipresent store of information. They have found that when American students expect to have access to information in the future, they remember that information less well. But there’s a positive flipside: they’re also better at remembering where to find the information again.

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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"

 

"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.

 

Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."

 

This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.

 

And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"

 

What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)

 

 

Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10

 

Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/

 

(Image credit: Behance.net)

 

 


Via Robin Good, João Greno Brogueira, Amanda McAndrew, THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*, LaiaJoana, Rui Guimarães Lima, Ramon Aragon, Paulo Simões
Dennis T OConnor's insight:

Curation is applied information fluency.  Learning the skill set of a curator smacks the Common Core Standards on the rump and screams See That! 


Empower your students. Introduce them to curation. 

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Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?

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Content Curation: A Key Skill Needed By 21st-Century School Librarians

Content Curation: A Key Skill Needed By 21st-Century School Librarians | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

Robin Good: School librarians may be one of the new change-making roles in the educational revolution silently taking place. Their role as organizers, collectors and guides to relevant information is a skillset that is not only in growing demand by the marketplace, but which perfectly fits the learning needs of today students / tomorrow information workers.


Joyce Valenza and Shannon Miller, who recently presented at the Building Learning Communities conference, think that we are about to witness a "golden age" of librarianship and that there are five skills that information / school librarians need to cultivate.


The first of these is curation.


"Given the unprecedented quantity of information learners are exposed to, the librarian’s role is more important than ever.


Librarians help all students gain access to, evaluate, ethically use, create, share, and synthesize information.


...


Students have long documented their research in notebooks, bibliographies, and research papers, but the presenters described these containers as inadequate for the digital landscape.


In the 20th century, content was king, but in this millennium, curation has emerged as the new monarch.


Valenza and Miller highlighted emerging technologies that help students showcase their progress as they acquire, organize, contextualize, and archive both existing content and new learning.


...The presenters stressed the value of teaching learners to purposefully contribute to society’s collective intelligence.


...


School librarians, with their specialized training and background in collecting, organizing, preserving, and disseminating information, must now teach their patrons—students and educators alike—to perform these tasks."


Relevant. 7/10


Full article: http://www.eschoolnews.com/2012/08/02/five-key-roles-for-21st-century-school-librarians/






Via Robin Good
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