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21st Century Information Fluency
21CIF: Locate, Evaluate and Ethically use Digital information: Co Curators: Dennis O'Connor & Carl Heine
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A 12 Point Library Program Checklist for School Principals - 2012 - Home - Doug Johnson's Blue Skunk Blog

A 12 Point Library Program Checklist for School Principals - 2012 - Home - Doug Johnson's Blue Skunk Blog | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
RT @litchick_ky: A 12 Point Library Program Checklist for School Principals - 2012 - Home - Doug Johnson's Blue Skunk Blog http://t.co/ZK8Xt0s3...

Via Trish Wade, Librarian@HOPE, Dr. Laura Sheneman
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TheirSpace: Educating Digitally Ethical Teens

Slidedeck for SxSWedu 2012 presentation.

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What’s our future – school libraries and librarians

What’s our future – school libraries and librarians | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
It disturbs me that we are not seriously thinking about the future of school libraries. This statement will receive incensed objections; teacher librarians are, after all, talking about changes in ...

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Credit and Attribution Are Fantastic Untapped Resources for Discovery, Not Duties: Maria Popova and The Curator's Code

Credit and Attribution Are Fantastic Untapped Resources for Discovery, Not Duties: Maria Popova and The Curator's Code | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Maria Popova has just launched a classy and laudable initiative, focused on increasing awareness and in highlighting the importance of honoring always where or via who you have got to a certain article, report, video or image.

 

Credit and attribution are not just a "formal" way to comply with rules, laws and authors but an incredibly powerful emebddable mechanism to augment findability, discovery, sinergy and collaboration among human being interested in the same topic.

 

She writes: "In an age of information overload, information discovery — the service of bringing to the public’s attention that which is interesting, meaningful, important, and otherwise worthy of our time and thought — is a form of creative and intellectual labor, and one of increasing importance and urgency.

 

A form of authorship, if you will.

 

Yet we don’t have a standardized system for honoring discovery the way we honor other forms of authorship and other modalities of creative and intellectual investment, from literary citations to Creative Commons image rights."

 

For this purpose Curator's Code was created.

 

Curator's Code is first of all "a movement to honor and standardize attribution of discovery across the web" as well as a web site where you can learn about the two key types of attribution that we should be using:

a) Via - which indicates a link of direct discovery

b) Hat tip - Indicates a link of indirect discovery, story lead, or inspiration.

 

Each one has now a peculiar characterizing icon that Curator's Code suggests to integrate in your news and content publication policies. 

 

Additionally and to make it easy for anyone to integrate these new attribution icons in their work, Curator's Code has created a free bokkmarklet which makes using proper attribution a matter of one clic.

 

Hat tip to Maria Popova and Curator's Code for launching this initiative. 

 

Whether or not you will sign Curator's Code pledge, become an official web site supporting it, or adopt its bookmarklet instantly is not as important as the key idea behind it: by providing credit and attribution to pieces of content you find elsewhere, you not only honestly reward who has spent time to create that content, but you significantly boost the opportunity for thousands of others to connect, link up to, discover and make greater sense of their search for meaning.

 

Read Maria Popova introductory article to Curator's Code: http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/03/09/curators-code/ 

 

How to use the Curator's bookmarklet: http://vimeo.com/38243275 

 

Healthy. Inspiring. 9/10

 

Curator's Code official web site: http://curatorscode.org/ 

 

N.B.: Too bad that the Curator's Code bookmarklet doesn't work with Scoop.it, as the one excludes the other. But you could save the two codes for the special attribution characters in a text note and copy and paste whicever you need. Given the need for simplicity and integration this is not an ideal solution but I am sure that between Maria and Guillaume at Scoop.it they will find a way to make this work easily for all. Maria and Guillaume: what do you say?

 


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Beth Kanter's comment, March 11, 2012 1:01 PM
Thanks Robin for sharing and curating this article with your summary. I discovered it via Barbara Bray's collection where she had re scooped your scoop -- [and if following the curator's code added a via]. I came over here to rescoop (with a via!) because you are the original source and one of the links was broken (you corrected it and added an update) thus reminding me the importance of going to the original source. Here on scoop.it you can just follow the trail of the rescoop icon.

I am disappointed that the bookmarklet doesn't work together with the scoop.it one - but it would be great to have it integrated. Now to figure out how to rescoop it with the characters.
Robin Good's comment, March 11, 2012 1:12 PM
Hi Beth, thanks for your kind feedback. I was just out today for a video interview with Nancy White here in Rome, and she mentioned you as someone she likes for your ability to curate and make sense of things.

Re the integration of the curators' code icons, I have received feedback from Guillaume De Cugies of Scoop.it that he has been exchanging with Maria Popova and that he is looking with her for a way to integrate the two.

For now you can simply install the Curators' Code bookmarklet and use the "via"<a href="http://www.curatorscode.org" target="_blank" style="font-family:sans-serif;text-decoration:none" >&#x1525;</a> or hat tip <a href="http://www.curatorscode.org" target="_blank" style="font-family:sans-serif;text-decoration:none" >&#x21ac;</a> icons by copying and pasting their code into your scoops manually. The problem, at least for me is, that the scoop.it editing window is in the same position where the Curators' Code bookmarklet is and therefore I can't see both at the same time.

In any case I think it would be trivial for Scoop.it or any other tool to integrate such buttons directly into their system without having us to use two different tools for one task.
Karen Dietz's comment, March 11, 2012 9:36 PM
Many thanks Robin for the help! Somehow I missed the article -- computer fatigue probably :) I read it earlier today and look forward to using the codes. I'm thrilled to hear that scoop.it is looking into integrating them into the platform. Thanks for keeping us updated on this new, and important twist, for curating. Cheers -- Karen
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How To Improve Your Content Curation By Finding Better Sources

How To Improve Your Content Curation By Finding Better Sources | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

Excerpted from the original article: "So what is the secret sauce that makes people like Guy Kawasaki, Robert Scoble, or Mari Smith popular while most everyone else remains hidden?

 

In a word: Sources

 

In order to do this yourself, remember that you have to go beyond sharing the articles that land in your favorite RSS feeds, or just reposting something from your social media timeline (which honestly has probably been reposted a thousand times before).

 

To make your social curation easier, and more effective, here are a few things you might want to do:

 

a) Do a competitor check. It’s important to know what’s already out there

 

b) What do your competitors post? How or when do they post? What are their usual sources?

 

c) Study your competitor’s social media behavior meticulously. It’ll take time, yes, but once you’ve established where you stand, you can start looking for the best places to gather curated information without fear of repeating what others have already shared.

 

d) See what’s out there. Now that you know how your competitors work, you can begin creating your curation strategy, collecting the tools you need and compiling sources you can use to collate content. How many blog posts, videos and news articles are posted about your chosen topic everyday? Does your field have enough sources to sustain you, as far as your plan goes?

 

e) Is this what your audience really wants? This truly is the most important question you need to answer. You need to see what your audiences actually post online.

 

f) Create a market study on their digital behavior. You can check for yourself how audiences react towards your competitor’s social media efforts or use social media monitoring software to help you out."

 

The above is a summary of an excellent curation methodology created by the content curation platform Curata - How to Have an Effective Strategy for Curation

Check out their blog post on crafting the perfect content curation strategy for more details that further expands on the above.

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: http://www.business2community.com/content-marketing/raising-your-content-curation-to-the-next-level-0150451 


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Daniel J Smith's comment, March 26, 2012 7:09 PM
Awesome article Thanks for sharing. Daniel
resumebear's comment, March 29, 2012 6:28 PM
Rock it
Lori Wilk's curator insight, February 2, 2014 10:51 AM

Curating great content is not about passing around what everyone else is, it's about finding sources of great content and sharing that content with your audience. It takes work to find this content and to cultivate the right sources of information. You must understsnd what your audience is hungry for so you can provide content that will get results.

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How To Verify Content from Social Media: A Good Guide

How To Verify Content from Social Media: A Good Guide | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

Robin Good: If you are a journalist, a reporter, or a professional news curator, you MUST read this.

 

Excerpted from the guide: "This how-to features advice from a panel of experts on the key considerations, questions and tools journalists should have in mind when carrying out verification of content that surfaces via social media, be it a news tip, an image, a piece of audio or video.

 

The process covers three main stages: monitoring of social networks and the online community before news breaks, checking the content when it comes into play and subsequently reporting that content once verified. The comprehensive advice outlined in this how-to guide offers practical steps, specific questions and cross-checks journalists can make at each stage, as well as online tools to support them."

 

...to summarise, the top tips from our panel of experts on an effective verification process from start to finish are:

 

  • Monitor across platforms (including Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Soundcloud, AudioBoo, Bambuser)
     
  • Spot and understand trends (using tools like Hootsuite, Tweetdeck and Trendsmap to create lists and identify trending topics)
     
  • Build a network of contacts before the story breaks and limit the stress
     
  • Use online tools to examine evolution of images (including TinEye, Google Images and WolframAlfra)
     
  • Verifying sources – speak to them and cross reference answers with social data
     
  • Verifying sources – look at social media history across platforms
     
  • Use Whois tools to verify websites
     
  • Check for photoshopping or repetition in images
     
  • Apply the Too Good To Be True test
     
  • Harness online discussion boards and experts (use sites like Snope to spot urban myths and common hoaxes early on)
     
  • Question edited footage
     
  • How urgent is it – could more steps be taken to verify before you publish?
     
  • Crowdsourcing – 'be judicious' about how you send out unconfirmed information
     
  • Consider any permissions and crediting which may be necessary
     
  • Clearly communicate the level of verification a story has been given
     
  • Made a mistake or new information come to light? Issue a clear and networked correction

 

Invaluable. Very informative. Useful. 9/10

 

Full article: http://www.journalism.co.uk/news-features/how-to-verify-content-from-social-media/s5/a548645/ ;


Via Mindy McAdams, Robin Good
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Ruveanna Hambrick's curator insight, October 2, 2014 2:27 PM

This is a great source for knowing how to monitor and filter information on social media sites like Twitter and Facebook.

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Learning with 'e's: Libraries without walls

Learning with 'e's: Libraries without walls | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

I recently wrote about how libraries are adapting to the digital age. The traditional library is viewed by many as a place for stacks of books to gather dust, and where stern librarians in tweed jackets tell you to keep quiet. Libraries are shaking off this image, and embracing new technologies and approaches to support learning in the 21st Century.

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Five search engines you have never heard of

Five search engines you have never heard of | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
Live a little and use a different search engine! Try out these cool alternatives to major search engines and use them in the classroom.

Sure, Google is the undisputed leader in the world of internet search engines.
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TechLearning: 14 Ways K–12 Librarians Can Teach Social Media by Joyce Valenza

TechLearning: 14 Ways K–12 Librarians Can Teach Social Media by Joyce Valenza | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
The Resource for Education Technology Leaders focusing on K-12 educators.
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Handhelds in School Libraries Conference « Agnostic, Maybe

Handhelds in School Libraries Conference « Agnostic, Maybe | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
This past weekend, I had the privilege of attending the Handhelds in School Libraries unconference sponsored by the New Jersey library cooperative, LibraryLinkNJ. This conference idea originated in the hallway of last year's ...

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Accessible materials for individuals with visual and learning disabilities | Learning Ally, formerly Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic

Accessible materials for individuals with visual and learning disabilities | Learning Ally, formerly Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
Learning Ally (formerly Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic) offers an online catalog of the best audio book and audio learning opportunities on the internet.

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10 Ways Researchers Can Use Twitter | Networked Researcher

10 Ways Researchers Can Use Twitter | Networked Researcher | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

Via antonella esposito, GRIAL Univ Salamanca
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Reflective Teaching for Librarians

Reflective Teaching for Librarians | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

"Most librarians are educators in one sense or another, even when the role is not explicit. The best teachers learn from others and learn by doing. This is a good rule for improving at virtually anything: Seeking inspiration and accepting criticism makes your work richer and more well rounded."

 

This article, adapted from Char Booth's book on Reflective Teaching, Effective Learning (2011), presents her ideas based on her own method expanded through mentorship, coteaching, online forums, and other collaboration channels: http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/features/03142012/reflective-teaching-librarians


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Teaching to the Common Core State Standards Using Blended Instruction

Video

 

Teach technology and media literacy while providing students more opportunities to develop their reading, writing, communication, critical thinking and problem solving skills. More effectively prepare your students for life beyond high school!


Via Mel Riddile, Cindy Carbajal, Dennis T OConnor
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How Groofer Works to Find Relevant Results | Groofer

How Groofer Works to Find Relevant Results | Groofer | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

"Groofer works by filtering, matching, and presenting what’s relevant in your in your news and blog stream, based on the collective smarts of your work groups."


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Hoshyar Foundation | Note & Point

Hoshyar Foundation | Note & Point | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
Ready to make a difference? Since it's inception, the Hoshyar Foundation has helped provide education and care for over 2,000 girls/women that otherwise would not have the opportunity in oppressive nations such as Pakistan and other South Asian...
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The Practical Mini-Guide for Content Curators: What You Really Need To Pay Attention To

The Practical Mini-Guide for Content Curators: What You Really Need To Pay Attention To | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Kenneth Lange on his blog does really an excellent job of synthesizing the key things you need to pay attention to if you are starting to seriously consider "curation" as a content production format.

 

From trust to focus and infrequency, Mr Lange touches on all the very and most sensitive points a content curator should be sensitive too.

 

 Clear, synthetic, to the point. 

 

A recommended reading. 9/10

 

Full article: http://www.kennethlange.com/content_curation.html 


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Kenneth Lange's comment, April 6, 2012 7:27 AM
Thanks Robin for sharing this and your kind words.
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Ways to use QR Codes in the Elementary Classroom and Using Google Docs to Create Them

Ways to use QR Codes in the Elementary Classroom and Using Google Docs to Create Them | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
Quick Response codes also known as QR codes are similar to barcodes. When you scan QR codes using apps such as i-nigma, with your smartphone, ipad and computer (if you have a web camera) it links information to you. The information can be text, videos or websites etc. I believe with bring your own technology coming to many schools, I see QR codes becoming more popular in the classroom because they can be read on many devices and it is a real world application now. Here are some ways you can use QR codes in the classroom…
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Mobile Devices Drive Creative Instruction

Mobile Devices Drive Creative Instruction | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
News, Articles and Community for district-level decision makers in K-12 education. Magazine published monthly, with daily news and blogs and online content.

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Creative Commons explained (video) – eLearning Blog Dont Waste Your Time

Creative Commons explained (video) – eLearning Blog Dont Waste Your Time | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

Here is a great explanation of the different ‘attribution’ or license elements of Creative Commons:


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The Adventures of Library Girl: The 10 Web 2.0 Tools/Apps I Use Most As A Teacher, Learner & Leader

The Adventures of Library Girl: The 10 Web 2.0 Tools/Apps I Use Most As A Teacher, Learner & Leader | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

Awhile back Larry Ferlazzo wrote about the Web 2.0/Social Media tools that he uses every day. I read Larry’s blog all the time, but what struck me about this post was not the tools that he listed as being useful to him, (even though I use many of them myself), but rather the actual process of identifying the technology he uses each and every day. Not that this is hard work, mind you, it’s just that technology is such a ubiquitous part of my life; the tools/toys I use most often don’t feel like “tools” at all – rather they are almost an extension of who I am: a part of my daily routine so “normal” that I don’t think twice about the important role they play. Of course I start my day with a cup of coffee, my google reader and a personalized web curation app. Doesn’t everyone?

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The Learning Power of LEGO| The Committed Sardine

The Learning Power of LEGO| The Committed Sardine | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

Everybody loves LEGO, and it was certainly an exciting part of my own childhood. Like many other kids who were that age, I revelled in letting my imagination take over as I built pretty much anything I could think of. As you create, a whole back story evolves behind what you've made with your LEGO, and there are no limitations. That's what makes it such a great learning tool—this is pure creative power. This infographic shows just how successful it can be as an educational resource.

posted by Lee Crockett
Mar 31, 2012

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WebGL Bookcase

WebGL Bookcase | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
Browse thousands of titles from Google Books.

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Discovering Assistive Technology

Discovering Assistive Technology | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

Free, online, self-paced tutorial developed California School Library Association about assistive technology for people with disabilities.


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