21st Century Information Fluency
116.1K views | +2 today
Follow
21st Century Information Fluency
21CIF: Locate, Evaluate and Ethically use Digital information: Co Curators: Dennis O'Connor & Carl Heine
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Dennis T OConnor from VirtualLibrarySchool
Scoop.it!

Mining OER infographic

Mining OER infographic | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

Via John Shank, Joyce Valenza
Dennis T OConnor's insight:

Open Educational Resources -- Dig in!

more...
OFFREDI Didier's curator insight, March 9, 3:20 AM
Mining OER infographic | @scoopit via @MarkEDeschaine http://sco.lt/...
Patricia Sweeney's curator insight, March 9, 8:20 AM
A Helpful Guide to Understanding Open Educational Resources
Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, March 13, 9:22 PM
Sometimes searching for materials in the internet can take hours. If you are looking for a specific lesson or how to meet a specific objective, chances are someone has a lesson for it.  Looking through Open Educational Resources can help you find what you need, or at least get you started in the right direction.
Scooped by Dennis T OConnor
Scoop.it!

MUSOPEN: Royalty free music. Public domain and copyright free classical music.

MUSOPEN: Royalty free music. Public domain and copyright free classical music. | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

Musopen is a 501(c)(3) non-profit focused on increasing access to music by creating free resources and educational materials. We provide recordings, sheet music, and textbooks to the public for free, without copyright restrictions.

Dennis T OConnor's insight:

The mission statement says it all: " Put simply, our mission is to set music free."

more...
reuvenwerber's curator insight, June 29, 2015 2:20 AM

Musopen is a 501(c)(3) non-profit focused on increasing access to music by creating free resources and educational materials. We provide recordings, sheet music, and textbooks to the public for free, without copyright restrictions.

Scooped by Dennis T OConnor
Scoop.it!

Academic citation practices need to be modernized so that all references are digital and lead to full texts.

Academic citation practices need to be modernized so that all references are digital and lead to full texts. | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
Finally, let me plead directly with any readers who exercise power in the scholarly publication process — because you edit a journal or a book series, you work for a publisher or undertake editing for authors, or you are a powerful person in your professional academic association. Look hard at the rules, conventions and styles that you are currently applying. Can you honestly say that your legacy requirements meet contemporary needs and have adapted to the digital dissemination of scholarship? Are your citation rules designed in a ‘born digital’ way? Do they foster open access and the replicability of research by getting the full texts of source materials in front of readers in the most direct and simple way possible? If not, why not think about changing?
Dennis T OConnor's insight:

Common sense ideas for the 21st century.  I particularly appreciate the thinking about OER as the preferred primary resource. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis T OConnor from Libraries and eLearning
Scoop.it!

Open Access the key to ivory towers

Open Access the key to ivory towers | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
One Australian university is pushing the boundaries of unrestricted access to its scholarly research.

Via Rickie Morey, Peter Mellow
more...
OAGU's curator insight, December 5, 2013 7:39 PM

Changing publishing models and content types.

Rescooped by Dennis T OConnor from Online and Blended Learning in K-12+
Scoop.it!

Joyce Valenza: OER and you. The curation mandate — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch

Joyce Valenza: OER and you. The curation mandate — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it

...the good news:  Our government edtech officials are convinced that librarians should play a role in curating the burgeoning number of open educational resources (they gave us several shout-outs and ensured we were there).  We made an impact.
But it was clear to our little group, that to the larger majority of the participants, we were not even on the OER radar.

 

Some OER background:


Launched in October, GoOpen is a U.S. Department of Education campaign founded with the belief that  educational opportunities should be available to all learners. Creating an open education ecosystem involves making learning materials, data, and educational opportunities available without restrictions imposed by copyright laws, access barriers, or exclusive proprietary systems that lack interoperability and limit the free exchange of information.


Via Gordon Dahlby
Dennis T OConnor's insight:
Thanks to Gordon Dahlby for the cogent commentary!
 
"Joyce has a nice article on OER.  Concerning observations, especially about the gathered groups knowledge of OER.
 
Certainly, we know some acquaintances who used to write/publish openly, even with clear Creative Commons monickers.  We've also seen individuals them move the resources and successor materials behind membership, paywalls, and pay for use teacher-developed materials sights.
 
As has been common since the 90's, broken links and moved digital assets are a considerable challenge. It will prove interesting to watch the costs of replacing once open content when newly classified after updating. I may not occur.  
 
The question of moving copies on sight or into school clouds while doing version checking will also be interesting to watch. 
 
Will OER be the 'living' resources mentions so often in discussing 'smart books;' books/multi-media texts that are updated perpetually by the team of authors and bots loop through verification loops of any hyper-media/text referenced.  
more...
Gordon Dahlby's curator insight, March 7, 2016 4:25 PM
Joyce has a nice article on OER.  Concerning observations, especially about the gathered groups knowledge of OER.

Certainly, we know some acquaintances who used to write/publish openly, even with clear Creative Commons monickers.  We've also seen individuals them move the resources and successor materials behind membership, paywalls, and pay for use teacher-developed materials sights.

As has been common since the 90's, broken links and moved digital assets are a considerable challenge. It will prove interesting to watch the costs of replacing once open content when newly classified after updating. I may not occur.  

The question of moving copies on sight or into school clouds while doing version checking will also be interesting to watch. 

Will OER be the 'living' resources mentions so often in discussing 'smart books;' books/multi-media texts that are updated perpetually by the team of authors and bots loop through verification loops of any hyper-media/text referenced.  
Rescooped by Dennis T OConnor from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

How To Find Openly Licensed Educational Resources You Can Use [Infographic]

How To Find Openly Licensed Educational Resources You Can Use [Infographic] | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
Most of us turn to the internet when we are looking for resources to use for a presentation, report or article. The internet holds the key to so many robust resources.

Yet how many of these resources can you legally use for free? How many of them can you adapt?

That’s where Open Educational Resources (OER) can help. Here’s an infographic from the Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (at the University of Texas at Austin) that can help.
Dennis T OConnor's insight:

What if you could use textbooks without any cost to you or your students (other than your precious time?


If you've got the time, you can probably find an OER resource that fits. 

more...
Iolanda Bueno de Camargo Cortelazzo's curator insight, February 19, 2015 12:00 PM

Bastante úteis estas informações para professores e gestores educacionais.

NancyEvans@ATS-LU's curator insight, March 30, 2016 9:14 AM

OER is a powerful concept.  Help yourself and your students by grabbing this concept with both hands. 

NancyEvans@ATS-LU's curator insight, March 30, 2016 9:40 AM

OER is a powerful concept.  Help yourself and your students by grabbing this concept with both hands. 

Rescooped by Dennis T OConnor from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

16 OER Sites Every Educator Should Know -- Campus Technology

16 OER Sites Every Educator Should Know -- Campus Technology | 21st Century Information Fluency | Scoop.it
Open educational resources not only save students from triple-digit (or more!) textbook costs, but they also allow instructors to mix-and-match content for a more personalized, engaging learning experience. Here are 16 resources that offer a wide range of content and tools to help implement OER in just about any course.

Via Elizabeth E Charles, Dennis T OConnor
more...
Ann Ewel's curator insight, July 24, 2014 12:14 PM

This looks like a great resource and not only that Elizabeth who scooped it first, also looks like a great resource -- lots of interesting scoops-- one to follow!

Jean Jacoby's curator insight, July 24, 2014 5:58 PM

Really useful - why reinvent the wheel!

NancyEvans@ATS-LU's curator insight, March 30, 2016 9:16 AM

OER = Open Educational Resources.... materials you can use in your classrooms or your online courses.