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Contemporary Literacies
Curated by #literacies courses at Vanderbilt and NYU. For information ask on Twitter with #literacies or @writerswriting and @Dr_Pendergrass.
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Twitter use | Pew Internet & American Life Project

Twitter use | Pew Internet & American Life Project | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it
African-Americans — Black internet users continue to use Twitter at high rates. More than one quarter of online African-Americans (28%) use Twitter, with 13% doing so on a typical day.
Young adults — One quarter (26%) of internet users ages 18-29 use Twitter, nearly double the rate for those ages 30-49. Among the youngest internet users (those ages 18-24), fully 31% are Twitter users.
Urban and suburban residents — Residents of urban and suburban areas are significantly more likely to use Twitter than their rural counterparts.
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TEDxWarwick - Doug Belshaw - The Essential Elements of Digital Literacies


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An Analytical Take on Youth, Social Networking, and Web 2.0: A Few Moments with Amanda Lenhart | DMLcentral

An Analytical Take on Youth, Social Networking, and Web 2.0: A Few Moments with Amanda Lenhart | DMLcentral | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it

"For the “Teens, Kindness and Cruelty on Social Network Sites” report, you chose not to lead with the term “bullying.” Has the word become problematic?

There has been a lot of research and media coverage around the concept of bullying and cyberbullying, and we wanted this study to be able to speak to that, but through our own focus group work and through other qualitative work from experts such as danah boyd and Alice Marwick, we knew the term bullying was not really resonating with all youth. An alternate term “drama” was much more widely recognized, and when asked to describe it in these qualitative research moments, youth often described what we would call -- as adults – bullying and ascribed this term drama to that. It became clear that the term bullying wasn’t doing all the work that needed to be done to fully understand what was going on in this digital space..."


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11 Facts About Bullying

11 Facts About Bullying | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it

56% of students have personally felt some sort of bullying at school. Between 4th and 8th grade in particular, 90% of students are victims of bullying.

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Recording and uploading video

Recording and uploading video | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it
Recording and uploading video | Pew Internet & American Life Project..

"27% of teen internet users record and upload video to the internet; older teens are more likely to record and upload videos.

Among teen internet users 12-17, just over one quarter (27%) say they record and upload video to the web, up from 14% of teens who had done so in 2006.1 Among adults, 14% have uploaded videos.2

In our most recent data collection, older teens 14-17 are more likely to record and upload video than their younger counter parts, with 30% of online older teens saying they record and share videos, compared with 21% of 12-13 year olds.

In a change since 2006, boys and girls are equally likely to record and upload videos.

Nearly equal shares of online boys (28%) and girls (26%) say they shoot and share video. In 2006, online boys were nearly twice as likely as online girls to report uploading video they had taken, with 19% of boys and 10% of girls reporting the activity."

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Use blogs as texts to teach argument, style and global citizenship | Where the Classroom Ends

Use blogs as texts to teach argument, style and global citizenship | Where the Classroom Ends | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it
It’s easy to think that all blogs are gossip driven.  Perez Hilton rules supreme.  But most major news publications today run a significant amount of...
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Teens & Online Video | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

Shooting, sharing, streaming and chatting – social media using teens are the most enthusiastic users of many online video capabilities...
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Collective Knowledge ConstructionideasLAB | ideasLAB

Collective Knowledge ConstructionideasLAB | ideasLAB | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it

Collective Knowledge Construction

How might we best describe what contemporary teaching and learning looks like? There is a need for us to have a theoretical model that allows us to better understand our student’s use of technology and be much more discriminatory in our use of technology for learning… Now that our students are living and learning in a technology-rich world, it is important that we are able to more critically discuss and evaluate our practice to ensure our students are getting the most from their online experiences, that they are exploring a whole new array of opportunities for higher-order thinking and learning, and that we fully understand the real value and impact of what is being learnt.

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Why Critical Design Literacy is Needed Now More Than Ever | DMLcentral

Why Critical Design Literacy is Needed Now More Than Ever | DMLcentral | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it

"Critical Design Literacy

The concept is informed by design thinking, a rich and dynamic process that emphasizes inquiry, innovation, ideation, building, and problem solving. Critical design literacy applies the protocols of design thinking to practice social innovations that lead to social transformation. In the learning environments that we will pilot we want students to become literate in critical thinking and critical designing. The former encourages students to look at their community through an inquisitive lens while the latter encourages students to design for community impact.

Critical design literacy challenges some of our most ‘common sense’ notions of schooling. In general schools seek to produce good, loyal, and dutiful citizens. But what if the mission of our learning institutions is to create engaged, critical, and future-building citizens? Keri Facer reminds us that future-building schools must do more than train students to inhabit some pre-determined future. Schools should be community resources and laboratories that help students develop the competence and the experience to intervene in the making of a future that is more equitable, desirable, and sustainable.

Critical design literacy also challenges the notion that the primary role of schools is to prepare students to get jobs in the global economy. Because a majority of the students at Texas City High will not attend college there is a tremendous amount of pressure on teachers and administrators to focus on career readiness. Critical design literacy strives to do more than prepare students for participation in the economy; it strives to prepare students for participation in their community. There is something extraordinarily empowering about seeing the world through the lens of critical design, a lens that encourages students to do what designers do: develop the skills to change existing situations into preferred ones.

Additionally, critical design literacy embraces the learning and design principles of connected learning, a interdisciplinary research network that believes,”that the most meaningful and resilient forms of learning happen when a learner has a personal interest or passion that they are pursuing in a context of cultural affinity, social support, and shared purpose.”

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Questions are better when there are no answers

Questions are better when there are no answers | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it
I heard about someone recently who said they refuse to do crosswords because they ‘didn’t want to waste time solving a problem for which the answer is already known by someone else.’ It’s an interesting viewpoint.

When we attempt to solve a puzzle set by someone else, we are really attempting to re-modeling our thought processes into the same setup as the author of the puzzle.

This is nowhere more true than in exam situations. The candidate is trying to get inside the head of the examiner to deliver the answer they are looking for.
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INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION: Socially Complex Text and The Common Core

INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION: Socially Complex Text and The Common Core | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it

"I define socially complex texts as concurrent arguments that unfold in print and social media with varying degrees of authority and amplification. Basically socially complex texts are authored by opposing focus discussing an issue with equal passion and mutual disdain."

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Talking With Your Fingers

Talking With Your Fingers | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it
E-mailing and texting are not writing at all. They are something altogether new: written conversation.
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The Influencing Machine: A Brief Visual History of the Media

The Influencing Machine: A Brief Visual History of the Media | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it

"What a statue of Saddam has to do with cognitive bias, or how to think critically about improving information.

"Brain studies suggest that consuming information on the Internet develops different cognitive abilities, so it’s likely we are being rewired now in response to our technology. That process doesn’t stop. It can’t stop. And even the most strident critics of the Internet cannot truly wish for it to stop, considering how far we have come since we grasped that first tool.”

 

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Infographics and charts - interactive data visualization | Infogr.am

Infographics and charts - interactive data visualization | Infogr.am | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it
Infogr.am is a super-simple tool for data visualization - creation of interactive infographics and charts...

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Digital Citizenship Poster

Digital Citizenship Poster | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it

Go way beyond Internet safety. Turn students into great digital citizens.


Get all the tools you need with our FREE Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum and Parent Media Education Program. The relevant, ready-to-use instruction helps you guide students to make safe, smart, and ethical decisions in the digital world where they live, study and play.

 

Every day, your students are tested with each post, search, chat, text message, file download, and profile update. Will they connect with like minds or spill TMI to the wrong people?

 

Will they behave creatively or borrow ideas recklessly? Will they do the right thing or take shortcuts?

 

Read more...

 


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Learning of foreign languages enhances the brain

Learning of foreign languages enhances the brain | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it
Learning of a second foreign language is particularly beneficial not only for one’s curriculum but also for the brain, according to a new scientific research.

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On Academic Uses of Social Media and Blogging as Public Engagement | HASTAC

On Academic Uses of Social Media and Blogging as Public Engagement | HASTAC | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it
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Venessa Miemis: Birth of a Meme – The Rise of Culture Tech « Public Intelligence Blog

Venessa Miemis: Birth of a Meme – The Rise of Culture Tech « Public Intelligence Blog | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it

I’m seeing a leveling up as we move beyond mapping “social graphs,” and move consciously towards mapping intentions, emotions, capacities, worldviews, desires, value creation, gratitude, and energy.

 

All of this has essentially been leading me to the same place:

 

There is an urge to redesign human culture, to construct life and work in a way that enables everyone to ‘follow their bliss’ and show up fully in their gifts and experience. We want to experience higher intelligence and capacities, and to choose what represents meaning and significance in life. We want to do it with style, grace, ease, beauty, and simplicity — as art.

 

While this is still a work in process, I’m defining culture tech as follows:

 

‘the systems, tools, processes and etiquettes designed to cultivate the full expression of the authentic self, liberate collective creativity and imagination, and foster the expansion of universal human capacity’


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Our Malleable Minds | Psychology Today

Our Malleable Minds | Psychology Today | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it
New blog explores how experiences shape the brain and mind By Daniel Casasanto , Ph.D...People are not all the same. There is astonishing diversity among human languages, cultures, and bodies. Sounds that come naturally to speakers of one language may sound alien to speakers of another. Customs that are commonplace in one community may appear fantastic to someone across the globe. Actions that one person performs easily may be impossible for someone with a different kind of body—imagine trying to dunk like Michael Jordan, or sing like Mariah Carey.
How is the diversity of the human experience reflected in the mind? What is universal about the concepts we form, and what depends on the particulars of our physical and social experiences? Can two people ever share the same thought? Can one person ever have the same thought twice, or do thoughts necessarily change from person to person and from moment to moment? Malleable Mind will explore emerging answers to these questions.
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Cherish Plagiarism < Richard Olsen's Blog

Cherish Plagiarism < Richard Olsen's Blog | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it

"At yesterday’s presentation at the QSA Conference I suggested that we should cherish plagiarism, and that over the top concerns about copyright and privacy/cyber bullying are the ugly evil twins trying to stop technology-driven pedagogical transformation. There was pushback from some, and unfortunately we didn’t have time to finish the discussion. So here is why I think plagiarism is fantastic, crucial for learning and should be encouraged and celebrated, and why schools’ obsession with copyright and attributing is so harmful."

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Are today's students truly 'tech savvy'? | ZDNet

Are today's students truly 'tech savvy'? | ZDNet | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it
A new report released by the ESRC puts doubt in the theory.
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The Flight From Conversation

The Flight From Conversation | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it
We use technology to keep one another at distances we can control: not too close, not too far, just right: the Goldilocks effect.
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Common Standards Ignite Debate Over Prereading

Common Standards Ignite Debate Over Prereading | Contemporary Literacies | Scoop.it
Many educators have inferred that the common core bans the practice of providing students with context and content before they read text.
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Twitter In Schools-A Getting Started Guide

"While Twitter is beginning to catch on with many educators, schools are lagging in their adoption of the platform. But let's think about it. Twitter is a quick and easy tool to let the entire school community know whats going on with you and your students. Updates can come from anywhere and users don't have to have a Twitter account to follow along.

But where do you start? What are some things to consider? Here is my primer and some advice for schools (and districts) that want to start using Twitter."

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