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21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience
A list of resources and articles on psychology and learning
Curated by Tom Perran
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Understanding How the Brain Thinks | Edutopia

Understanding How the Brain Thinks | Edutopia | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Empowering and connecting teachers, administrators, and parents with innovative solutions and resources to better education. Join the conversation today!
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20 Study Hacks to Improve Your Memory

20 Study Hacks to Improve Your Memory | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
We’ve scoured our brains and the internet for the best study hacks to help your brain remember information quicker and easier and ultimately help you do better in your exams. 1.
Tom Perran's insight:

Hi-tech, lo-tech and no-tech ways to improve your memory and your performance on exams.

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ExamTime's comment, April 1, 6:27 AM
Thanks for sharing Tom and love your comment.
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How does memory work? | The Edynco blog

How does memory work? | The Edynco blog | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
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Tom Perran's curator insight, March 23, 9:32 AM

Interactive learning map that shows how we get and keep new information

David Baker's curator insight, March 24, 3:20 PM

Memory and the interactive modeling of both how it works and how to support memory are topics of interest for teachers.

Connie Hamilton Ed.S.'s curator insight, April 12, 11:54 PM

If we want to help our students to learn efficiently, we should know something about functioning of our memory.

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35 Psychology-Based Learning Strategies For Deeper Learning

35 Psychology-Based Learning Strategies For Deeper Learning | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
"Have you ever considered letting your students listen to hardcore punk while they take their mid-term exam? Decided to do away with Power Point presentations during your lectures? Urged your students to memorize more in order to remember more? If the answer is no, you may want to rethink your notions of psychology and its place in the learning environment. Here are 35 critical thinking strategies, straight from the mind of Sigmund Freud." | by Sara Briggs
Via Todd Reimer
Tom Perran's insight:
Good strategies to incorporate when planning instruction. (some we already use!)
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Audrey's curator insight, March 9, 7:10 AM

Some of these are excellent memory methods, which people learn automatically from a very young age. One way to help older learners is to try to get them back to that exciting trial and error style that they had as young children.  

 

Watch babies aged a year plus and see how they are fascinated by simple activities such as picking up a pencil and walking backwards and forwards to drop it at a certain spot, then walking around a table and carrying out the same action again and again. But watch carefully, the spot the pencil has been placed is usually near something else, sometimes a larger object.  

 

One of the things we stop doing as we get older is to enjoy repeating things from different perspectives:  that is learning with stress.  If students looked at what they were learning as something that enhanced their understanding rather than just for passing exams, learning would be memorable and more enjoyable.  You do not need a teacher to' teach' you this.  Most of the psychology-based strategies are inherent.


So parents start children as soon as they start crawling;  leave books, small toys and a variety of different toys around and watch how they learn. NOT EVERYTHING GOES INTO THEIR MOUTHS!!

audrey curating for www.homeschoolsource.co.uk


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Glowing Worms Illuminate Roots of Behavior in Animals

Glowing Worms Illuminate Roots of Behavior in Animals | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Researchers develop novel method to image worm brain activity and screen early stage compounds aimed at treating autism and anxiety. A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and The Rockefeller University in New York has developed a novel system to image brain activity in multiple awake and unconstrained worms. The technology, which makes it possible to study the genetics and neural circuitry associated with animal behavior, can also be used as a high-throughput screening tool for drug development targeting autism, anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, and other brain disorders. The team details their technology and early results in the paper "High-throughput imaging of neuronal activity in Caenorhabditis elegans," published on-line in advance of print by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . "One of our major objectives is to understand the neural signals that direct behavior—how sensory information is processed through a network of neurons leading to specific decisions and responses," said Dirk Albrecht, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at WPI and senior author of the paper. Albrecht led the research team both at WPI and at Rockefeller, where he served previously as a postdoctoral researcher in the lab of Cori Bargmann, PhD, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and a co-author of the new paper. To study neuronal activity, Albrecht’s lab uses the tiny worm Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), a nematode found in many environments around the world. A typical adult C. elegans is just 1 millimeter long and has 969 cells, of which 302 are neurons. Despite its small size, the worm is a complex organism able to do all of the things animals must do to survive. It can move, eat, mate, and process environmental cues that help it forage for food or react to threats. As a bonus for researchers, C.elegans is transparent. By using various imaging technologies, including optical microscopes, one can literally see into the worm and watch physiological processes in real time. In addition to watching the head neurons light up as they picked up odor cues, the new system can trace signaling through "interneurons." These are pathways that connect external sensors to the rest of the network (the "worm brain") and send signals to muscle cells that adjust the worm's movement based on the cues. Numerous brain disorders in people are believed to arise when neural networks malfunction. In some cases the malfunction is dramatic overreaction to a routine stimulus, while in others it is a lack of appropriate reactions to important cues. Since C. elegans and humans share many of the same genes, discovering genetic causes for differing neuronal responses in worms could be applicable to human physiology. Experimental compounds designed to modulate the action of nerve cells and neuronal networks could be tested first on worms using Albrecht’s new system. The compounds would be infused in the worm arena, along with other stimuli, and the reaction of the worms’ nervous systems could be imaged and analyzed.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Tom Perran's insight:
Fascinating and promising new research!
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A Wonderful Graphic Featuring The Importance of Music in Education [Infographic]

A Wonderful Graphic Featuring The Importance of Music in Education [Infographic] | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it

Via Gust MEES
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Audrey's curator insight, November 8, 2013 12:57 PM

I believe this is absolutely amazing!  This must be really great for those people whose preferred way to learn is through sound. Music is a very helpfu way to encourage learning. I have watched young children become captivated when they hear certain types of music.  At the Royal Festival Hall in London there are concerts with classical music specifically aimed at pre-school youngsters and above.  The growth in their neurons must be incredible!!!  Written by Audrey Foster for curated content at www.homeschoolsource.co.uk

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 8, 2013 1:03 PM

I found students enjoyed finding out what music I listen to. It did not mean they liked it, but it gave them insight that other things don't always.

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5 Teaching Strategies To Keep Students From Turning Off Their Brains

5 Teaching Strategies To Keep Students From Turning Off Their Brains | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
5 Teaching Strategies To Keep Students From Turning Off Their Brains

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Great insights from Dr. Judy Willis

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Why we need more visual texts in our teaching and learning

Why we need more visual texts in our teaching and learning | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Tom Perran's insight:

Lots of good reasons provided here including the question of time spent providing "extra" examples.

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The Brain Science Behind Learning

The Brain Science Behind Learning | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Details how the infographic Brainy Approaches to Learning supports Personalized Learning.

Via Kathleen McClaskey
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Audrey's comment, May 28, 2013 5:10 PM
I feel overwhelmed. There is so much to learn.
Johani Karonen's curator insight, May 29, 2013 3:01 AM

Lump or not - the brain always amazes me.

Laura Lubin, MS. Ed. HRD's curator insight, June 22, 2013 8:58 AM

Amazing view into the science and how to personalize learning with universality in mind. 

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Your Child's Brain on Math - Pacific Standard

Your Child's Brain on Math - Pacific Standard | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Pacific Standard Your Child's Brain on Math Pacific Standard Parents whose children are struggling with math often view intense tutoring as the best way to help them master crucial skills, but a new study released on Monday suggests that for some...
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Audrey's comment, May 12, 2013 7:01 PM
The most effective mathematics tutoring I have seen was by a teenage student who demonstrated basic principles to his tutees and used everyday examples to consolidate understanding. He actually understood that his tutees did not have knowledge of basic principles, Audrey@homeschoolsource.co.uk.
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Nine Stubborn Brain Myths That Just Won't Die, Debunked by Science

Nine Stubborn Brain Myths That Just Won't Die, Debunked by Science | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Brain games will make you smarter! The internet is making you dumber! Alcohol is killing your brain cells! The brain is a mystery we've been trying to solve for ages, and the desire to unlock its secrets has led to vast amounts of misinformation.

Via Sally DeCost
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How poverty influences a child's brain development

How poverty influences a child's brain development | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Science is figuring out exactly how the damage is done and what steps can be taken to halt and then heal it

Via Deborah McNelis
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David Hain's curator insight, January 29, 2013 5:11 AM

Reminded me of stories of the Romanian orphans from years ago and the power of a hug.

Audrey's comment, January 29, 2013 5:20 AM
There is is the possibility that poverty may prevent the stimulation needed for children to develop their curiosity which leads to learning. Poverty could be confining in terms of not sufficient nutrients in order to help develop the neural network. Also poverty seems to isolate children from social interactions which is critical for development; audrey@homeschoolsource.co.uk.
Mercor's curator insight, February 12, 2013 12:23 PM

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How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today

How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it

 

 By Jim Taylor, Ph. D.

 

"There is...a growing body of research that technology can be both beneficial and harmful to different ways in which children think. Moreover, this influence isn’t just affecting children on the surface of their thinking. Rather, because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops. For example, as the technology writer Nicholas Carr has observed, the emergence of reading encouraged our brains to be focused and imaginative. In contrast, the rise of the Internet is strengthening our ability to scan information rapidly and efficiently.

 

"The effects of technology on children are complicated, with both benefits and costs. Whether technology helps or hurts in the development of your children’s thinking depends on what specific technology is used and how and what frequency it is used. At least early in their lives, the power to dictate your children’s relationship with technology and, as a result, its influence on them, from synaptic activity to conscious thought.

 

"Over the next several weeks, I’m going to focus on the areas in which the latest thinking and research has shown technology to have the greatest influence on how children think: attention, information overload, decision making, and memory/learning. Importantly, all of these areas are ones in which you can have a counteracting influence on how technology affects your children."


Via Deborah McNelis, Terry Doherty, Meryl Jaffe, PhD, Jim Lerman, Lynnette Van Dyke, Gust MEES
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Linda Buckmaster's comment, December 17, 2012 5:44 PM
Thanks for the rescoop.
Jim Siders's curator insight, March 20, 2013 12:06 PM

to tech or not to tech........that is the question. Not just a casual question if this report is accurate.

sarah's curator insight, May 31, 2013 2:04 AM

Très intéressant.

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Kindness Is Something Students Learn By Feeling It

Kindness Is Something Students Learn By Feeling It | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
“ Kindness Is Something Students Learn By Feeling It by Lisa Currie, Ripple Kindness Project Most people have heard the phrase ‘random acts of kindness’, which refers to a selfless act of giving resulting in the happiness...”
Via Dean J. Fusto
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What Is The News Doing To Your Brain?

What Is The News Doing To Your Brain? | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
“ How often do you check a screen to see what's going on in the news? It's probably a lot more often than you think. Consider your Twitter feed. Consider your Facebook timeline. Consider how many text message alerts you are...”
Via Mat Loup
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Interesting critique of the "Taylor Swift-boating" of today's news.
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6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns

6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns
Tom Perran's insight:

Use research-based principles of neuroscience  to organize and present materials to maximize student learning.

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Sharrock's curator insight, March 18, 9:10 AM

I get excited with research and the implications of research. I value evidence and application over theory and anecdotal information. Validity. The problem will always be in how the research is interpreted and translated/fitted from one setting (the lab) to the classroom (practical use). Neuroscience is relatively new. There is nothing wrong with testing these ideas for use in the classroom though. However, the "Usable classroom translations" are sometimes close in "proximity" to what we educators already believe (indicating perhaps a confirmation bias), or the translations are huge leaps from the research takeaway (the conclusion?). For example, the author references this: "Brain Target 4: Teaching for Mastery
Neuroscience behind it: In order for information to be retained it must make its way from short-term to long-term memory.
Usable classroom translation: Use the arts as a tool to enhance and reinforce learning goals (Rinne, Gregory, Yarmolinskaya, and Hardiman, 2011)".  This doesn't fit with my understanding of evidence. I need a few more connections between the "dots" of research conclusion with the implicated classroom practice.

sarah's curator insight, March 19, 4:45 AM

utile pour nos programmes et pour mieux connaître nos élèves.

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Cognitive Load Theory and Instructional Design

Cognitive Load Theory and Instructional Design | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
“ Understanding the basics of the Cognitive Load Theory and applying them to your instructional design is an absolute must, particularly if you want your learners to get the most out of the eLearning course you are creating. This guide will offer you a detailed look at Cognitive Load Theory, including how it can be applied in learning settings. Check the Cognitive Load Theory and Instructional Design article and presentation to find more.”
Via mjonesED
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Important information for maximizing student achievement
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The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know

The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know  by Judy Willis M.D., M.Ed., radteach.com As education continues to evolve, adding in new trends, technologies, standards, and 21st century thinking habits, there is one constant that...
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Will Gourley's curator insight, November 15, 2013 5:44 PM

Compendium for teachers looking to develop ongoing understanding of brain based learning and neuroscientific terminology.

Audrey's curator insight, November 16, 2013 7:11 AM

I would agree one hundred per cent!  Everyone should know about how their brain works. and not only teachers.  On www.hotmoodle.com  there is a helpful way to start learning about the brain.

 

Mind Mappen's curator insight, December 18, 2013 8:05 AM

Mindmappen zorgt voor een optimale samenwerking van beide hersenhelften; het helpt je o.a. om beter te onthouden en te leren. Maar hoe werken je hersenen eigenlijk bij het leren van nieuwe vaardigheden / kennis. Dit interessante artikel geeft jouw antwoorden.

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Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read

Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Click above to view full image! Any book lover can tell you: diving into a great novel is an immersive experience that can make your brain come alive with imagery and emotions and even turn on your senses.

Via Anu Ojaranta, Karen Bonanno, Patricia LeClair, KB...Konnected, R.Conrath, Ed.D., Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA, Dean J. Fusto
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sarah's curator insight, October 27, 2013 7:08 AM

intéressant

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, October 27, 2013 4:07 PM

Educators have long told us that reading expands our minds. Here are some of the specific ways in which they do so.

Carol Rine's curator insight, October 29, 2013 7:54 AM

This is a GREAT article that has lots of embedded cross-linked articles within it.  :O)

 

Carol

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The Neurological Explanation For Practice Makes Perfect

The Neurological Explanation For Practice Makes Perfect | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
The Neurological Explanation For Practice Makes Perfect
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Audrey's comment, September 9, 2013 6:01 AM
Yes.... Start young. This means pre-school education.
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Voices may not trigger brain's reward centers in children with autism

Voices may not trigger brain's reward centers in children with autism | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it

In autism, brain regions tailored to respond to voices are poorly connected to reward-processing circuits, according to a new study by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

The research could help explain why children with autism struggle to grasp the social and emotional aspects of human speech. "Weak brain connectivity may impede children with autism from experiencing speech as pleasurable," said Vinod Menon, PhD, senior author of the study, published online June 17 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 

 

Read more at: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130617160853.htm

 


Via Stewart-Marshall, Natalie Stewart
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Look! Something Shiny! How Some Textbook Visuals can Hurt Learning

Look! Something Shiny! How Some Textbook Visuals can Hurt Learning | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Unnecessary visual information may distract children from learning, say Ohio State psychologists.

Via Gina Stepp
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Gina Stepp's curator insight, May 8, 2013 1:07 PM

The study found that most teachers thought the visuals would have enhanced learning, and would have chosen teaching materials containing them. 

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Online brain-training: does it really work?

Online brain-training: does it really work? | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Websites that claim to be able to increase concentration, verbal reasoning and memory have become big business. But do they really work, asks Elizabeth Day

Via Peter Skillen
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Peter Skillen's curator insight, April 21, 2013 8:25 AM

THANK GOODNESS for articles like these that 'question the authority' of those who misrepresent and extrapolate current neuroscience research - for profit.

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Your Brain Is Hooked on Being Right

Your Brain Is Hooked on Being Right | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
The adrenaline and dopamine rush you get from winning an argument feels good. Too good.

Via Deborah McNelis
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John Michel's curator insight, April 2, 2013 5:58 AM

I'm sure it's happened to you: You're in a tense team meeting trying to defend your position on a big project and start to feel yourself losing ground. Your voice gets louder. You talk over one of your colleagues and correct his point of view. He pushes back, so you go into overdrive to convince everyone you're right. It feels like an out of body experience — and in many ways it is. In terms of its neurochemistry, your brain has been hijacked.

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Smart Teaching: Understanding What the Brain Can’t Ignore | 252 Blog

Smart Teaching: Understanding What the Brain Can’t Ignore | 252 Blog | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Do you know why infographics that combine compelling graphics, charts, lists and texts are so popular and spread so quickly? Our brain processes visual information 60,000 times faster than printed ...
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Sally DeCost's curator insight, December 23, 2012 11:09 AM

Great infographic for teachers to think about!

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Change Your Words... Change Your World

A powerful clip relaying the how effective the right words can be ...it will change your world, your classrooms, your students, your children.

 

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Gust MEES

 

WOW! That video touched me! I nearly had tears in my eyes, a MUST watch!

Keywords: Empathy, Emotional Intelligence, Human, Society, Daniel GOLEMAN, Howard GARDNER...

 

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Via Meryl Jaffe, PhD, Gust MEES
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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, June 29, 2013 9:21 AM

A MUST, MUST see

Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, August 4, 2013 7:51 PM

Changing how you view your world can simply change your world.  

Prunetti Beatrice's comment, August 11, 2013 8:18 AM
really true. This is marketing