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21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience
A list of resources and articles on psychology and learning
Curated by Tom Perran
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How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today

How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it

 

 By Jim Taylor, Ph. D.

 

"There is...a growing body of research that technology can be both beneficial and harmful to different ways in which children think. Moreover, this influence isn’t just affecting children on the surface of their thinking. Rather, because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops. For example, as the technology writer Nicholas Carr has observed, the emergence of reading encouraged our brains to be focused and imaginative. In contrast, the rise of the Internet is strengthening our ability to scan information rapidly and efficiently.

 

"The effects of technology on children are complicated, with both benefits and costs. Whether technology helps or hurts in the development of your children’s thinking depends on what specific technology is used and how and what frequency it is used. At least early in their lives, the power to dictate your children’s relationship with technology and, as a result, its influence on them, from synaptic activity to conscious thought.

 

"Over the next several weeks, I’m going to focus on the areas in which the latest thinking and research has shown technology to have the greatest influence on how children think: attention, information overload, decision making, and memory/learning. Importantly, all of these areas are ones in which you can have a counteracting influence on how technology affects your children."


Via Deborah McNelis, Terry Doherty, Meryl Jaffe, PhD, Jim Lerman, Lynnette Van Dyke, Gust MEES
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Linda Buckmaster's comment, December 17, 2012 5:44 PM
Thanks for the rescoop.
Jim Siders's curator insight, March 20, 2013 12:06 PM

to tech or not to tech........that is the question. Not just a casual question if this report is accurate.

sarah's curator insight, May 31, 2013 2:04 AM

Très intéressant.

Rescooped by Tom Perran from Psychology Update
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June 19 - "Minding Psychology: A Weekly Update"

June 19 - "Minding Psychology: A Weekly Update" | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it

This weekly newspaper brings updates on what's happening in psychology, in particular sharing resources designed to increase our knowledge of the field.


Via Natalie Stewart
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Rescooped by Tom Perran from Mom Psych
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Natures Neurons: Do Early Experiences in the Natural World Help Shape Children’s Brain Architecture?

Natures Neurons: Do Early Experiences in the Natural World Help Shape Children’s Brain Architecture? | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it

What role do early childhood experiences in nearby nature play in the formation of brain architecture? It’s time for science to ask that question.

 

In January, New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof reported on the American Academy of Pediatrics’ “landmark warning that toxic stress can harm children for life.” This was, he wrote, a “’policy statement’ from the premier association of pediatricians, based on two decades of scientific research,” and he added that the statement “has revolutionary implications for medicine and for how we can more effectively chip away at poverty and crime.”

 

From conception through early childhood, brain architecture is particularly malleable and influenced by environment and relationships with primary caregivers, including toxic stress caused by abuse or chronic neglect. By interfering with healthy brain development, such stress can undermine the cognitive skills and health of a child, leading to learning difficulty and behavior problems, as well as psychological and behavior problems, heart disease, obesity, diabetes and other physical ailments later in life.


Via Daniel House, Martin Daumiller, Alice Ruxton Abler, Rachelle Capo, Gina Stepp
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Alice Ruxton Abler's comment, August 3, 2012 3:42 PM
Many thanks for the rescoop!