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New form of brain plasticity: Study shows how social isolation disrupts myelin production

New form of brain plasticity: Study shows how social isolation disrupts myelin production | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Animals that are socially isolated for prolonged periods make less myelin in the region of the brain responsible for complex emotional and cognitive behavior, researchers at the University at Buffalo and Mt.
Via Deborah McNelis
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21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience
A list of resources and articles on psychology and learning
Curated by Tom Perran
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Understanding How the Brain Thinks | Edutopia

Understanding How the Brain Thinks | Edutopia | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Empowering and connecting teachers, administrators, and parents with innovative solutions and resources to better education. Join the conversation today!
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Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world."How do you think the world (starting with our perceptions) could change if the map looked differently? What if Australia was on top and the hemispheres switched? By changing how we look at a map we truly can begin to explore and change our assumptions about the world we live in."Geography doesn’t just teach us about the Earth; it provides ways for thinking about the Earth that shapes how we see the world. Maps do the same; they represent a version of reality and that influences how we think about places. Tags: mapping, perspective.
Via Seth Dixon
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Important to help us all understand how we and others see the world.
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Study smarter, learn better: 8 tips from memory researchers

Study smarter, learn better: 8 tips from memory researchers | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Here's why re-reading is a total waste of time.
Tom Perran's insight:

8 things that students (and teachers) can do to enhance learning. Good basic strategies that should be a part of everyday instruction.

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Audrey's curator insight, August 27, 9:01 AM

Some of the tips:

*Ask yourself lots of question

*Connect new information to something you already know

*Make information visual, eg. flowcharts, mindmaps

*Space out learning - a little at a time

*Mix up your lessons - eg cross curricular: link economics with history or psychology with with everything!

 

Psychologists should go to www.hotmoodle.com

 

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Neuroscientists say handwriting is good for you (Science Alert)

Neuroscientists say handwriting is good for you (Science Alert) | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it

Using our keyboards saves us lots of precious time, but writing by hand has lots of benefits.

Researchers have shown that children who know how to write by hand learn to read faster. They are also better at retaining information and coming up with new ideas.

“When we write, a unique neural circuit is automatically activated. There is a core recognition of the gesture in the written word, a sort of recognition by mental simulation in your brain,” Stanislas Dehaene, a psychologist at the Collège de France in Paris, told The New York Times.

A study conducted at Indiana University, in the US, reported that when children write by hand three areas of the brain are activated—the left fusiform gyrus, the inferior frontal gyrus and the posterior parietal cortex. These are the same areas that are set in motion when adults read and write. Kids who typed or just traced letters didn’t show any activation in these areas.

 

 


Via Miloš Bajčetić, Petra Pollum, Edgar Mata
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Annel Montelongo's comment, June 30, 7:57 PM
Siempre he pensado que las actividades que realizamos a mano son de gran importancia ya que estimulan partes del cerebro que no pueden desarrollarse con otras actividades, como recientemente leía en uno de sus artículos publicados en el siglo de torreón en internet, usted ya recordara pero quiero mencionarlo:
Hablaba sobre la importancia de inculcar el arte a los niños ya que como ya mencione estimula las es sistema motriz a temprana edad y algunas partes de su cerebro se desarrollan más rápido esto permite que el niño o este caso los jóvenes capten más rápido las ideas planteadas.
Merci professeur , très utile ;)
La dulsura de las Matemáticas's curator insight, June 30, 10:27 PM

interesante hasta donde a podido llegar la ignorancia de nosotros mismos las culturas que se van fundando por moda. se ha dejado de escribir en libretas para escribir en computadoras ala bes es bueno porque te vas innovando y vas aprendiendo de la tecnología cada vez mas. ya que todo hoy en dia es basado en pura tecnología. 

Carolina Nuñez's comment, July 2, 4:39 PM
La costumbre de escribir a mano se va perdiendo poco a poco ya que con eso de que hoy en día los niños cada vez más prefieren usar la tecnología y van olvidando o mejor dicho se van haciendo flojos y ya ni el nombre quieren escribir a mano por el hecho de que les da flojera . pero esta mal porque cuando escribimos en cualquier teclado nos estamos olvidando de lo que de verdad importa e incluso te enseñas a escribir palabras mal escritas pero como al escribir por teclado es la moda todo mundo lo hace y si el cerebro se hace más lento en aprender pero ese es un problema de la sociedad que no ve lo que de verdad debe de ver y sigue haciendo que su cerebro no piense ya que lo único que piensa es que la tecnología lo hace todo.
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How Trauma Affects The Brain Of A Learner

How Trauma Affects The Brain Of A Learner | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Science may be able to help schools combat the adverse effects of poverty.
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Fascinating report that describes the effects that the difficulties that our students face have on their ability to learn. 

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Having Asperger's is like living in a world not built for you - Independent.ie

Having Asperger's is like living in a world not built for you - Independent.ie | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
“I was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome, a condition on the autism spectrum, at the age of five.”
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Create Audio for your site with a Free mp3 player | AudioPal

Create Audio for your site with a Free mp3 player | AudioPal | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Create your Free player with the AudioPal editor. Use text-to-speech, mic, or upload mp3! Easily embed the flash player in any html site. Make your website interactive with an mp3 player!
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Simple to use. No download required!

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Tom Perran's curator insight, June 7, 8:29 AM

Simple to use. No download required!

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ADHD at School: Hyperactivity Help

ADHD at School: Hyperactivity Help | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Strategies for harnessing ADHD hyperactivity in the classroom.
Tom Perran's insight:

This article offers practical strategies that you can use now to help your students succeed.

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Kindness Is Something Students Learn By Feeling It

Kindness Is Something Students Learn By Feeling It | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
“ Kindness Is Something Students Learn By Feeling It by Lisa Currie, Ripple Kindness Project Most people have heard the phrase ‘random acts of kindness’, which refers to a selfless act of giving resulting in the happiness...”
Via Dean J. Fusto
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What Is The News Doing To Your Brain?

What Is The News Doing To Your Brain? | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
“ How often do you check a screen to see what's going on in the news? It's probably a lot more often than you think. Consider your Twitter feed. Consider your Facebook timeline. Consider how many text message alerts you are...”
Via Mat Loup
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Interesting critique of the "Taylor Swift-boating" of today's news.
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6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns

6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns
Tom Perran's insight:

Use research-based principles of neuroscience  to organize and present materials to maximize student learning.

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Sharrock's curator insight, March 18, 6:10 AM

I get excited with research and the implications of research. I value evidence and application over theory and anecdotal information. Validity. The problem will always be in how the research is interpreted and translated/fitted from one setting (the lab) to the classroom (practical use). Neuroscience is relatively new. There is nothing wrong with testing these ideas for use in the classroom though. However, the "Usable classroom translations" are sometimes close in "proximity" to what we educators already believe (indicating perhaps a confirmation bias), or the translations are huge leaps from the research takeaway (the conclusion?). For example, the author references this: "Brain Target 4: Teaching for Mastery
Neuroscience behind it: In order for information to be retained it must make its way from short-term to long-term memory.
Usable classroom translation: Use the arts as a tool to enhance and reinforce learning goals (Rinne, Gregory, Yarmolinskaya, and Hardiman, 2011)".  This doesn't fit with my understanding of evidence. I need a few more connections between the "dots" of research conclusion with the implicated classroom practice.

sarah's curator insight, March 19, 1:45 AM

utile pour nos programmes et pour mieux connaître nos élèves.

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Cognitive Load Theory and Instructional Design

Cognitive Load Theory and Instructional Design | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
“ Understanding the basics of the Cognitive Load Theory and applying them to your instructional design is an absolute must, particularly if you want your learners to get the most out of the eLearning course you are creating. This guide will offer you a detailed look at Cognitive Load Theory, including how it can be applied in learning settings. Check the Cognitive Load Theory and Instructional Design article and presentation to find more.”
Via mjonesED
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Important information for maximizing student achievement
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The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know

The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know  by Judy Willis M.D., M.Ed., radteach.com As education continues to evolve, adding in new trends, technologies, standards, and 21st century thinking habits, there is one constant that...
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Will Gourley's curator insight, November 15, 2013 2:44 PM

Compendium for teachers looking to develop ongoing understanding of brain based learning and neuroscientific terminology.

Audrey's curator insight, November 16, 2013 4:11 AM

I would agree one hundred per cent!  Everyone should know about how their brain works. and not only teachers.  On www.hotmoodle.com  there is a helpful way to start learning about the brain.

 

Mind Mappen's curator insight, December 18, 2013 5:05 AM

Mindmappen zorgt voor een optimale samenwerking van beide hersenhelften; het helpt je o.a. om beter te onthouden en te leren. Maar hoe werken je hersenen eigenlijk bij het leren van nieuwe vaardigheden / kennis. Dit interessante artikel geeft jouw antwoorden.

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Drug pruning extra synapses in brain can treat autism – study

Drug pruning extra synapses in brain can treat autism – study | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Autistic children have an excessive amount of synapses, or brain connections between neurons, which doesn’t alter as it should with age, US scientists have revealed. This could help develop a drug normalizing their number even after diagnosis.
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The Neuroscience Behind Stress and Learning

The Neuroscience Behind Stress and Learning | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Neuroimaging and EEG studies provide a scientific basis for the sometimes controversial belief that children become better learners when they actually enjoy learning.
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Improve student outcomes by bringing joy to your classroom

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Free Technology for Teachers: Access and Use More Than 20,000 Historical Maps from the New York Public Library

Free Technology for Teachers: Access and Use More Than 20,000 Historical Maps from the New York Public Library | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it

The New York Public Library recently released more than 20,000 historical maps through NYPL Digital Collections. These maps can be downloaded in high resolution to re-use in your own projects.

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I modified this to add the description

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A Solution To The Cross Platform Classroom Problem - Edudemic

A Solution To The Cross Platform Classroom Problem - Edudemic | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
BYOD? Blended learning environment? Devices of every shape, size, and type in your classroom? Jen Carey offers solutions for cross platform classrooms.
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The Power of Chunking: How To Increase Learner Retention

The Power of Chunking: How To Increase Learner Retention | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
“Chunking is a critical element of the learning process and explains how we can learn and retain increasingly complex information.”
Via EDTC@UTB
Tom Perran's insight:
This article explains how chunking works and how to apply it in the classroom. Is based on the principle that it's easier to remember small sets of information and a large set. For instance, is it easier to remember 3054269547 or 305–4 26–9547?
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What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades

What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Even as the emphasis shifts to the keyboard, experts say that learning to write by hand improves motor skills, memory and creativity.
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Sally DeCost's curator insight, June 10, 3:38 PM

According to Science, handwriting helps children learn to read.

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Free Technology for Teachers: Sugar and the Human Brain

Free Technology for Teachers: Sugar and the Human Brain | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it

"How Sugar Affects the Brain http://bit.ly/1m7zQU3 is a TED-Ed lesson that I stumbled upon this evening while looking for a YouTube video about making sugar glazes (by the way, this is the one I was looking for).  In the TED-Ed lesson students learn why sugary foods and beverages can become addictive and how the human body processes sugar."


Via John Evans
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Good information on the reasons behind our "addiction" to sugar in all it's forms

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Reading Experience May Change the Brains of Dyslexic Students

Reading Experience May Change the Brains of Dyslexic Students | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Recent research suggests that the difficulties dyslexia creates with reading may not be hard-wired. Instead, experience may play a big role in exacerbating reading problems and, potentially, in easing them.
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20 Study Hacks to Improve Your Memory

20 Study Hacks to Improve Your Memory | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
We’ve scoured our brains and the internet for the best study hacks to help your brain remember information quicker and easier and ultimately help you do better in your exams. 1.
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Hi-tech, lo-tech and no-tech ways to improve your memory and your performance on exams.

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ExamTime's comment, April 1, 3:27 AM
Thanks for sharing Tom and love your comment.
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How does memory work? | The Edynco blog

How does memory work? | The Edynco blog | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
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Tom Perran's curator insight, March 23, 6:32 AM

Interactive learning map that shows how we get and keep new information

David Baker's curator insight, March 24, 12:20 PM

Memory and the interactive modeling of both how it works and how to support memory are topics of interest for teachers.

Connie Hamilton Ed.S.'s curator insight, April 12, 8:54 PM

If we want to help our students to learn efficiently, we should know something about functioning of our memory.

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35 Psychology-Based Learning Strategies For Deeper Learning

35 Psychology-Based Learning Strategies For Deeper Learning | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
"Have you ever considered letting your students listen to hardcore punk while they take their mid-term exam? Decided to do away with Power Point presentations during your lectures? Urged your students to memorize more in order to remember more? If the answer is no, you may want to rethink your notions of psychology and its place in the learning environment. Here are 35 critical thinking strategies, straight from the mind of Sigmund Freud." | by Sara Briggs
Via Todd Reimer
Tom Perran's insight:
Good strategies to incorporate when planning instruction. (some we already use!)
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Audrey's curator insight, March 9, 4:10 AM

Some of these are excellent memory methods, which people learn automatically from a very young age. One way to help older learners is to try to get them back to that exciting trial and error style that they had as young children.  

 

Watch babies aged a year plus and see how they are fascinated by simple activities such as picking up a pencil and walking backwards and forwards to drop it at a certain spot, then walking around a table and carrying out the same action again and again. But watch carefully, the spot the pencil has been placed is usually near something else, sometimes a larger object.  

 

One of the things we stop doing as we get older is to enjoy repeating things from different perspectives:  that is learning with stress.  If students looked at what they were learning as something that enhanced their understanding rather than just for passing exams, learning would be memorable and more enjoyable.  You do not need a teacher to' teach' you this.  Most of the psychology-based strategies are inherent.


So parents start children as soon as they start crawling;  leave books, small toys and a variety of different toys around and watch how they learn. NOT EVERYTHING GOES INTO THEIR MOUTHS!!

audrey curating for www.homeschoolsource.co.uk


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Glowing Worms Illuminate Roots of Behavior in Animals

Glowing Worms Illuminate Roots of Behavior in Animals | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it
Researchers develop novel method to image worm brain activity and screen early stage compounds aimed at treating autism and anxiety. A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and The Rockefeller University in New York has developed a novel system to image brain activity in multiple awake and unconstrained worms. The technology, which makes it possible to study the genetics and neural circuitry associated with animal behavior, can also be used as a high-throughput screening tool for drug development targeting autism, anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, and other brain disorders. The team details their technology and early results in the paper "High-throughput imaging of neuronal activity in Caenorhabditis elegans," published on-line in advance of print by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . "One of our major objectives is to understand the neural signals that direct behavior—how sensory information is processed through a network of neurons leading to specific decisions and responses," said Dirk Albrecht, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at WPI and senior author of the paper. Albrecht led the research team both at WPI and at Rockefeller, where he served previously as a postdoctoral researcher in the lab of Cori Bargmann, PhD, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and a co-author of the new paper. To study neuronal activity, Albrecht’s lab uses the tiny worm Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), a nematode found in many environments around the world. A typical adult C. elegans is just 1 millimeter long and has 969 cells, of which 302 are neurons. Despite its small size, the worm is a complex organism able to do all of the things animals must do to survive. It can move, eat, mate, and process environmental cues that help it forage for food or react to threats. As a bonus for researchers, C.elegans is transparent. By using various imaging technologies, including optical microscopes, one can literally see into the worm and watch physiological processes in real time. In addition to watching the head neurons light up as they picked up odor cues, the new system can trace signaling through "interneurons." These are pathways that connect external sensors to the rest of the network (the "worm brain") and send signals to muscle cells that adjust the worm's movement based on the cues. Numerous brain disorders in people are believed to arise when neural networks malfunction. In some cases the malfunction is dramatic overreaction to a routine stimulus, while in others it is a lack of appropriate reactions to important cues. Since C. elegans and humans share many of the same genes, discovering genetic causes for differing neuronal responses in worms could be applicable to human physiology. Experimental compounds designed to modulate the action of nerve cells and neuronal networks could be tested first on worms using Albrecht’s new system. The compounds would be infused in the worm arena, along with other stimuli, and the reaction of the worms’ nervous systems could be imaged and analyzed.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Fascinating and promising new research!
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A Wonderful Graphic Featuring The Importance of Music in Education [Infographic]

A Wonderful Graphic Featuring The Importance of Music in Education [Infographic] | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Scoop.it

Via Gust MEES
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Audrey's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:57 AM

I believe this is absolutely amazing!  This must be really great for those people whose preferred way to learn is through sound. Music is a very helpfu way to encourage learning. I have watched young children become captivated when they hear certain types of music.  At the Royal Festival Hall in London there are concerts with classical music specifically aimed at pre-school youngsters and above.  The growth in their neurons must be incredible!!!  Written by Audrey Foster for curated content at www.homeschoolsource.co.uk

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 8, 2013 10:03 AM

I found students enjoyed finding out what music I listen to. It did not mean they liked it, but it gave them insight that other things don't always.