Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss
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Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss
Discussions of fitness and health activities. Workouts, eating and Body management and weight control.
Curated by Marty Roddy
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18 Tips To Lose Weight Naturally & Without Depriving Yourself

18 Tips To Lose Weight Naturally & Without Depriving Yourself | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
If you really want to shed some pounds, here are some tips to
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Regular Exercise And Healthy Diet Keep Diabetes At Bay — Small Doctor

Regular Exercise And Healthy Diet Keep Diabetes At Bay — Small Doctor | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
Regular Exercise And Healthy Diet Keep Diabetes At Bay Perfect and immaculate health is the dream of every single individual living on this planet because sick persons cannot enjoy their lives as they otherwise would.
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Exercise for stress relief - Yoga Poses for Stress

Exercise for stress relief - Yoga Poses for Stress | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
Exercise for stress relief
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Good Nutrition for Swimmers: What to Eat If You Swim

Good Nutrition for Swimmers: What to Eat If You Swim | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
Learn about what constitutes good nutrition for swimmers, and make sure you’re getting these five elements in your diet.
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Anti-Aging Foods and Beyond - Hippocrates Health Institute

Anti-Aging Foods and Beyond - Hippocrates Health Institute | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
By Brian Hetrich What causes us to age? Scientist who study Gerontology are not exactly sure. Some believe it is due to genetics, exposure to the sun, breathing, eating, or some kind of predetermined biological clock. One thing gerontologists all agree on is that that chronological age has little bearing on biological age. In other …

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Sandi Cornez's curator insight, April 28, 7:01 PM

Did you know that your chronological age has nothing to do with your true age? Yes you can be biologically younger. Science has known for a long time that what you consume and how you live your life aka lifestyle have a direct bearing on how you age.

 

Have you heard of telomeres?  Think of the plastic tip at the end of your shoelaces. When your cells replicate themselves, the tip gets a little shorter. This article explains in detail.

 

From research Dr Dean Ornish did it is known that "just three months on a whole foods plant based diet including exercise can significantly boost teleromase activity". Teleromase is an enzyme found in certain plants and in humans. Read about the follow up study results.

 

Health tips:  No matter how you chew it, plants are the bang for your buck for longevity and healthy aging.  Sprouts are the most nutrient dense land based food while blue green algae (spirulina and chlorella) are the most nutritious in fresh water and sea veggies are the best from the ocean.

 

Read more about "Anti-Aging Foods and beyond" from www.hippocrateshealthinstitute.org by Lindsay Johnson.

 

This www.scoop.it/t/zestful-living site is being curated by Sandi Cornez. Follow Sandi for more healthy food/water tips @http://ww.facebook.com/wisdomfromthewell

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5 Secrets to a ‘No-work’ Garden

5 Secrets to a ‘No-work’ Garden

Here are the strategies we used which enabled us to greatly increase our garden yield, while requiring less time and less work.
1. Use the ‘no-till’ method of gardening

 

‘No-till’ gardening is a series of methods in which the soil is never disturbed, thereby protecting the complex subsoil environment for the benefit of growing plants. Amendments such as compost, manure, peat, lime and fertilizer are simply added to the top of the garden beds, and over time they will be incorporated into the subsoil by watering and the activity of subsoil organisms. There is no need to dig anything into the soil.
With ‘no-till’ gardening, weeding is largely eliminated. The use of mulch blocks soil-borne weeds from emerging, and any weeds which do emerge are easy to pull out because the soil is always moist. This moist, spongy soil is also the perfect medium to boost the growth of your seedlings and transplants. This process mimics the way plants grow successively in nature.
By switching to ‘no-till’ methods, you won’t have to do the heavy tilling or shovel work which so many gardeners suffer through each spring. You will need to ensure the beds remain well mulched, and take care to never step on the beds.

2. Mulch, and mulch again!!!!

 

A thick layer of mulch around your plants and over the entire bed will enhance the growing conditions for garden plants while reducing time spent weeding and watering.
Mulch saves water because it reduces water lost to evaporation, and it prevents the surface of the soil from drying out. The need for regular watering is greatly reduced. Mulch also blocks weeds from sprouting, and any weeds that make it through are easy to pull since their roots are in moist, loose soil. Mulch is an essential garden amendment in areas where water isA thick layer of mulch around your plants and over the entire bed will enhance the growing conditions for garden plants while reducing time spent weeding and watering.
Mulch saves water because it reduces water lost to evaporation, and it prevents the surface of the soil from drying out. The need for regular watering is greatly reduced. Mulch also blocks weeds from sprouting, and any weeds that make it through are easy to pull since their roots are in moist, loose soil. Mulch is an essential garden amendment in areas where water isscarce.
Gardeners are always on the lookout for free sources of clean organic mulch to add their garden. Lawn clippings are a ready source, and fresh clippings are nitrogen-rich. If plants are close to fruiting, however, let grass clippings go dry and brown before using. Fall leaves, straw (not hay), seaweed, and forest duff can be used as mulch. Bark mulch, landscape cloth, geotextiles or plastic materials should not be used as mulch on vegetable beds.
View this chart of the common materials used for mulch and their properties when in use.
Once mulch is in place, it doesn’t need to be disturbed. Amendments like lime, compost and rock phosphate can be top-dressed. When transplanting or sowing seeds, simply part the mulch to sow seeds, then fold it back in place as seedlings take root.
The mulch you apply to your beds will gradually disappear as it breaks down and becomes incorporated into the soil. You’ll need to reapply mulch to your beds regularly, how often depending on the type of mulch used and the time of year. As the mulch gets thinner and disappears, you’ll know it all went into building new soil for the next crop.

3. Plant ‘green manure’ cover crops between rotations!!!!

By planting green manure cover crops, such as peas, vetch, rye or buckwheat, between crop rotations, we don’t have to purchase and haul heavy bags of peat moss as often. And we buy fewer bags of composted steer manure for fertilizer. The green manure crop is easy to seed, and when mature, it’s easy to turn under in preparation for the following vegetable crop.
Using green manures complements the ‘no-till’ method. Green manures and cover crops can be used to improve soil aeration, tilth and fertility without digging into the soil. Cover crops should be turned under before going to seed, but this can be done with minimal soil disturbance. We cut our cover crops to ground level using a garden shears, and leave the clippings in place, or we ‘smother’ the crop with a heavy mulch like seaweed. This creates a ‘lasagna effect’, and enables us to replant the bed without disturbing the soil. It also saves the work of tilling and weeding usually associated with gardening.

Here are some other ways green manure saves work:
Displaces weeds. Nature abhors a vacuum, and any exposed soil will soon be covered with weeds. Planting cover crops makes it more difficult for new weeds to get established.Reduces the need for peat. Each bag of peat we use has to be picked up and put down about 4 times before the peat is spread onto the garden beds. We need the peat to lighten and help aerate the soil, but green manure also contributes to the soil in much the same way.Reduces the need for fertilizer. Leguminous green manures will fix nitrogen into the soil, thereby reducing the fertilizer needed for new crops. We still need some fertilizer, and use canola meal for this. A benefit of using canola meal is that, unlike steer manure, it is lightweight and gardeners don’t have to worry about stray seeds being imported into the garden.

4. Grow in Raised Beds!!!!!
After a few hours in the garden, my back would gradually get sore and tired, sending me indoors for a cup of tea and a different activity. And as middle-age wanes, the flexibility of the back and knees seems to diminish. One day I noticed that our best beds, the ones which were well tended and yielded good harvests, were the tallest beds. My wife and I, it seemed, each gravitated to these beds because they were easier to tend than the ground-level beds.

 

Over the years we have converted the entire garden to raised beds. Today, we can enjoy gardening longer, without sore backs! And the garden is evenly productive, since all beds are equally comfortable to tend. After experimenting with various configurations, we’ve settled on beds which are 4’ wide, so we can reach across the bed from one side. Our garden is on sloping ground, so we built our beds 18” tall on the high side and about 6” – 10” on the low side. We work mainly from the high sides.
Raised beds have also enabled us to control the pathway weeds which used to encroach on the ground beds. By having the bed sides as barriers, it’s easy to control pathway weeds by laying down sheets of cardboard or bark mulch. The garden is tidier now and gives us a feeling that things are not growing out of control. And we spend almost no time weeding!

5. Use soaker hoses for watering!!!!!

 

For too many gardening seasons, we dragged the hose from bed to bed in order to keep our garden watered. We were slaves to dry weather, often changing our personal schedules to be in the garden to water a bed with starter plants. Care was taken to avoid watering the leaves of some plants, like tomatoes, to prevent blight, which meant we couldn’t just set a sprinkler and leave. Watering was done by hand since different crops had different water requirements.

Today, we simply turn on the water spigot and each bed receives a slow, steady flow of water directly to the root zones. Soaker hoses are laid on beds, delivering slow, steady dripping to the plant root zones. This saves us time, and also saves water since no spray is lost to wind, and our pathways do not get watered. This is important because pathway weeds will dry up and require less work in weeding. Less work!
Soaker hoses can be laid beneath light mulch, like straw, so they’re not visible. We also use a battery-powered electric timer to turn on the soaker hoses, and to turn them off after a designated period. This enables us to be off-site, without worrying about watering our vegetable plots.
To our surprise, we’ve had more consistent gardening results since switching to the soaker hose and timer system. The plants are bigger and the yield is greater. The slow, steady supply of water enables the roots to maintain a slow intake, feeding their natural absorption capacity. Our hand-watering practice, on the other hand, applied the water faster, and in larger amounts, which resulted in considerable water lost to runoff (which watered the pathway weeds) and less water actually being absorbed by the plant roots. We found that use of soaker hoses helped us achieve better garden production with less work.

 

 

 

 


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The five most uplifting sports movies - by Dominic Corry

The five most uplifting sports movies - by Dominic Corry | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
All sorts of movies attempt to provide some sort of emotional uplift, but one sub-genre especially associated with the sensation is the sports movie. - New Zealand Herald

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Why a Few Minutes of Exercise Can Show Results

Why a Few Minutes of Exercise Can Show Results | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
How the right combination of brief workouts could be as beneficial as a straight hour lifting weights or riding a bike.
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7 Muscle-Building Spring Foods

7 Muscle-Building Spring Foods | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
Spring has sprung with fruits and vegetables that can help pack on muscle and speed up recovery.
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Tummy Ease Smoothie « Kimberly Snyder

Tummy Ease Smoothie « Kimberly Snyder | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
Today’s featured smoothie is my Tummy Ease Smoothie! Over time, we may face toxic buildup in our intestines, which can affect our overall health and beauty, and sometimes cause our tummies to act up. I decided to create an easy and delicious recipe, using this sweet fruit of the tropics- Papaya! Fruit is one of …

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For a Healthy Heart: Get Enough Sleep

For a Healthy Heart: Get Enough Sleep | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
“Today we know that there is more to keeping the heart healthy than eating right and exercise. Getting the right amount of sleep is just as important. People wit”
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Blogsgotheart: Top Healthy Foods for a Healthy Heart

Blogsgotheart: Top Healthy Foods for a Healthy Heart | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it

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Green Drink That Melts Fat and Recovers the Body

Green Drink That Melts Fat and Recovers the Body | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
Stimulate the work of your metabolism with this fine green drink that is easy to prepare and can be a replacement for a meal or a snack
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Healthy meal plans for losing weight in few days

Healthy meal plans for losing weight in few days | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
Sound meal plans for losing weight is about what you eat as well as how you can adjust your way of life to get into a normal adhering to a good weight loss plans that work.
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7 Yoga Moves for Strong, Gorgeous Arms - SELF

7 Yoga Moves for Strong, Gorgeous Arms - SELF | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
We tapped yoga expert Alexandria Crow to develop a quick yoga sequence that targets the upper body—and she delivered, big time. This effective flow will fine-tune your alignment while strengthen and toning your arms, shoulders and back.
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10 Foods That Are Highly Fattening

10 Foods That Are Highly Fattening | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
Some foods are more fattening than others. Here is a list of 10 foods that can easily make you fat if you eat them often.

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11 Weird Things Sugar Does to Your Body

11 Weird Things Sugar Does to Your Body | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
Sugar might help you get through those hill sprints, but in excess, this sweet carb wreaks a bunch of not-so-great stuff throughout your body.

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Institute for Responsible Nutrition's curator insight, April 27, 1:53 PM

New science shows that this overload of sugar—often stemming from hard-to-detect hidden added sugars—is affecting your body in all sorts of strange ways. Check out these 11 weird things that sugar is doing to your body.

Sandi Cornez's curator insight, April 27, 8:48 PM

Did you know that excessive sugar consumption causes a cascade of metabolic injury to your body? Most people are now ingesting about 20 or more teaspoons/day or 150 pounds of sugar/year. This is insane.

 

Your body wasn't designed to handle the insulin spike that happens very quickly when you eat highly refined processed food stuff loaded with hidden sugars, high fructose corn syrup, and/or artificial sweeteners. Back in the Paleolithic days, your human ancestors ate starches aka complex carbs in the form of tubers, roots, fruits, and veggies.

 

Mother Nature is smart as she developed taste buds to detect the presence of starch. Starch was very important as it was a fuel supply. It released glucose into the bloodstream slowly. And here's the catch. The taste buds detecting the sweet taste of starch covered two-thirds of the tongue.

 

For the hunter-gatherers detecting sweet starch was critical for fuel and it also helped them with food safety. Poisonous plants are never sweet. But you and millions of other people live in a different age where sucrose (table sugar) is digested by enzymes in saliva and raise glucose levels in a few seconds. And the supply is unlimited.

 

Being on a sugar roller coaster not only ages you, but causes chronic diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cancer, and Alzheimer's disease. Sugar affects all your organs, including your brain. You may experience mood swings, brain fog, poor memory, fatigue, anxiety,  headaches, and depression.

 

Health tips: Isn't it time to switch from sickness to zestful-living? Try plant based real whole food and eliminate or greatly reduce your intake of sugar and all its derivatives. Learn to make your own food and avoid highly processed non food stuff. 

 

Grow your own sprouts, eat more dark leafy greens, add some algae, sea veggies to the mix. Eat ripe fruit if you're healthy and eat more veggies, legumes, nuts, seeds, and some whole grains. The more of these types of food you consume, the more your taste buds will crave these plant foods.

 

Read more about "11 ways Sugar Hurts Your Body" from www.bicycling.com by Leah Zerbe.

 

This www.scoop.it/t/dangers-of-sugar-consumption site is being curated by Sandi Cornez. Follow Sandi for more healthy food/water tips @http://www.facebook.com/wisdomfromthewell

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What Is Hügelkultur? - Urban Farm Online

What Is Hügelkultur? - Urban Farm Online | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
Build healthy soil your garden can rock out in with this German compost technique.By Erica Strauss 


Courtesy Jon Roberts/Wikimedia

Lasagna gardening. Sheet composting. No-till gardening. You’ve probably come across these and similar gardening techniques before. They are all slightly different variations on building a raised bed from layers of organic matter, which rots down right where it is, getting better and better as it composts in place. Techniques such as these promise that you can improve tilth, preserve soil structure, and create the garden bed of your dreams without a lot of backbreaking labor or expensive, imported garden soil.

 

Although some of these published methods offer specific "recipes” to create ideal, no-till beds, the basic technique is simple: Pile on a lot of organic, compostable material, and let nature take its course.

The latest bed-building method to turn gardeners’ heads is actually an ancient technique called hügelkultur. The German word, meaning "mound culture,” is usually pronounced "hoo-gull culture” in English-speaking gardening circles. It is one of many techniques associated with permaculture, a philosophy that seeks to understand, mimic and incorporate natural relationships and systems into the garden.

Hügelkultur differs from previously popularized no-till bed-building techniques in a few key ways:

1. Woody Base Material

Hügelkultur beds are ideally built with a base of logs or branches and prunings from woody shrubs. The larger the woody base material, the more self-sustaining you can expect the beds to be over time.

2. Size

Hügelkultur beds can be huge. Building beds 6 feet tall or more with entire trees as base material is not uncommon. At this size, hügels can be used as growing space as well as windbreaks and will require little to no supplemental irrigation. However, hügels do not need to be enormous to be effective. This type of bed offers many advantages to the small-scale gardener, even when diminished to a more reasonable backyard size of 2 or 3 feet.

3. Angle of Bed Sides

While most no-till methods create relatively flat beds, permaculture expert Sepp Holzeradvocates for a 45-degree (or steeper) angle on hügelkultur beds. In beds where the side angle is too shallow, he says the beds become compacted and the oxygen supply is decreased, which is detrimental to plant growth.

4. Long-Term Soil Fertility

Larger hunks of wood break down slowly, and their consistent decomposition provides long and even nutritional benefits to the soil and to the plants growing in the hügels.

5. Moisture Retention

As cellulose- and lignin-eating fungi act upon the woody base material, the logs and branches in the hügel break down into something like a sponge. This creates countless tiny air pockets and consistent moisture levels within the hügel. This combination is very conducive to plant root growth. Small hügels can go weeks without irrigation, while the largest ones can go entire summers without supplemental irrigation, even in dry climates.

Mound of Possibilities

Assess your site. Because this technique results in garden beds with a long-term soil fertility advantage, it’s best to spend some time thinking about how and where to locate your hügel before you start assembling.

Like any garden bed, you want to position your hügel where it will most benefit from the sun. Usually, this means building the bed so that it runs mostly north to south. Because hügels are mounded, not flat, beds built east to west will have one side always in shade. Unless you live in a very sunny climate and want to deliberately create a shaded, cooler microclimate, this isn’t ideal. Also, consider the prevailing wind direction and how the hügel can be buffered from strong winds.

 

Think about the slope of the ground where you will be building your bed and any moisture or water runoff issues that your garden has. Strategically placed hügels can soak up and hold excess water to good advantage, but you shouldn’t position them so that they create a barrier against the natural flow of water in your garden. If water runs against your hügel and pools, it can start to undermine your bed.

 

Feel free to be creative! A hügel can be made free-form and doesn’t have to be built as a rectangle. In fact, many hügels are built in a wide, open bowl-shape to capture the most energy and warmth from the sun.

Depending on the projected size of your hügel, you may need to start collecting woody waste material until you have built up quite a collection. Logs, branches, tree-trimmings, root balls and similar materials make the ideal base for a hügel, but work with what you have.

 

Untreated, unpainted, raw wood left over from building or construction projects may be incorporated into a hügelkultur. Wood chips can be used in place of logs or branches, but these will result in a more homogenous hügel with a much faster nitrogen "burn rate” and without the same long-term soil fertility advantages of a hügel made from larger pieces of wood.

Rotting wood is excellent for use in a hügel—in fact, the rotting of the wood is the magic behind this technique—but fresh-cut wood is fine, too. Just know that the results of the bed will improve as the wood breaks down over time, so don’t expect the best results in the first year if you start with green wood.

 

There are a few kinds of wood to avoid. According to Paul Wheaton, permaculture expert and founder of Permies.com and RichSoil.com, you should not use cedar, black locust, black cherry, black walnut or any treated wood in your hügelkultur bed.

 

Hügelkultur is an excellent, natural recycling technique, allowing woody waste to be converted into valuable growing space. For this reason, try not to buy fresh wood for your bed. If you don’t have appropriate materials on site, get creative. Call around to local tree-trimming companies, and ask if they could drop off some branches or scrap trimmings next time they are in your neighborhood. Maybe your city or town is taking down a tree that is interfering with power lines and would welcome help disposing of the wood.

HÜgel How-Tos

Holzer suggests that you begin building your hügel by digging out a shallow trench, removing any turf from the area where you will place the bed and setting it aside. However, unless you are building your hügel on top of a particularly pernicious grass, such as Bermuda, this step is not essential and you can build your bed directly on top of the lawn. This is less work, and in most climates, the sod will break down into beautiful soil once covered with the raised bed.

 

(Note: An exception to this rule is for gardeners building hügelkultur beds in arid climates. In these areas, building the hügel within a swale can help to collect and trap precious moisture and groundwater within the bed.)

Lay your woody material in the area designated for the hügelkultur bed. If you have a variety of sizes of wood, try to place the larger pieces toward the bottom and center of the bed and work outward with smaller branches and organic debris so that your bed is stable.

 

After the woody framework is built, tamp it down to give it good contact with the ground (this is particularly important if you did not initially trench the area under your hügel). Now you need to cover up your wood. The simplest way is to dump soil right on top of your base material. Holzer suggests turning upside down the sod strips removed when trenching for the hügelkultur bed and covering the wood with those. A layer of straw, chicken-coop litter, leaf debris, kitchen compost or half-finished compost also works just fine. Hügels are flexible; use what you have to cover the wood in the bed.

 

You want the top layer of organic matter to fill in any large pockets between the wood and to cover the bed by several inches. This layer will settle into the woody base naturally, so don’t compact it or worry too much about small empty gaps within the base layer.

 

Lastly, add a layer of finished compost or topsoil. You can add as much as you have—a foot, a few inches or none at all. Adding more compost will give your hügel a more finished appearance, but this step is a matter of preference rather than necessity.

Build Your Garden

Your hügelkultur bed is now ready to plant. You can seed it immediately or transplant vegetable starts into the soil pockets within and around the bed.

 

When I built my first hügelkultur beds last year, I was pleasantly surprised to find that they held a soil temperature notably higher than my traditional raised beds. Very early last spring, when my traditional raised beds were 42 degrees F, my hügelkultur beds were 47 degrees Fahrenheit. A few weeks later in mid-spring, the soil in the hügelkultur beds was up to 78 degrees Fahrenheit, which is very warm for Seattle in April. Hügelkultur beds will typically be warmer than the surrounding soil for several years as the woody base material composts in place.

 

I watered my hügel only three times over the course of the summer (my traditional beds were watered twice a week), yet still saw excellent results and lush growth from the beans, squash, peppers, tomatoes, corn and various greens I seeded in that spring. I’ve only had one problem with the beds: They seem to be magnets for my flock of backyard hens, who are drawn to the huge worm populations living in and around the beds. They scratch things up terribly!

 

My own experiments with building and planting hügelkultur beds have convinced me that this technique is an easy way to reduce organic waste, build top-quality soil for free and grow great crops with less irrigation.

Get more gardening techniques from UrbanFarmOnline.com:

The No-Soil SolutionHow to Make Organic Compost7 Tips for Container GardeningBuild a Rain GardenHow to Start Vertical Gardening 

About the Author: Seattle-based writer Erica Strauss covers urban homesteading, backyard chicken-keeping, edible gardening and more at Northwest Edible Life.

 


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Technique how to master the deadlift

Technique how to master the deadlift | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
Our guide to get you from prone to pro. Time to hit the bar
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Total body lift
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Best Fitness Tips

Best Fitness Tips | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
The Stunning Truth and Scientific Fact on Fat Loss! Insider health tips! Little-known ways to lose weight once and for all! The best diet report on disease prevention and minimizing the risk of weight gain & heart disease!
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When is the best time to exercise?

When is the best time to exercise? | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
Some people swear by a morning sweat session, while others prefer later in the day to help relieve the stress of the day. - New Zealand Herald

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Why blueberries really ARE the best food for your health

Why blueberries really ARE the best food for your health | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
A recent study at the US Department of Agriculture placed them top of the list when it comes to antioxidant activity - compared to 40 other fresh fruits and vegetables.

Via Sandi Cornez
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Sandi Cornez's curator insight, April 23, 4:39 PM

Did you know that blueberries and other berries really are the best fruiit for your health as they offer protection against cancer, boost your immune system, help your liver and brain? Berries are very high in antioxidants due to their vibrant anthocyanin pigments. Antioxidants fight free radicals which cause inflammation in your body.

 

Health tips: Are you aware that berries are second only to herbs and spices for their high levels of antioxidants? Blueberries clock in about 380 units with wild blueberries doubling that number. Apples on the other hand have about 60 units and bananas about 40. But the bang for your antioxidant buck are blackberries coming in at a whopping 650 units.

 

Blueberries are well known for helping with focus and memory issues as well as night vision. Enjoy eating your berries, whether fresh picked or from the grocery market. If you want cream on your berries, try cashew or coconut yogurt cream as dairy has been shown to block some of the beneficial effects of berries.

 

Read more about "Why Blueberries Really ARE the Best Food for Your Health" from www.dailymail.co.uk by Megan Campbell for the Hippocratic Post.

 

This www.scoop.it/t/zestful-living site is being curated by Sandi Cornez. Follow Sandi for more healthy food/water tips @http://www.facebook.com/wisdomfromthewell

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11 Healthy Habits to Improve Your Sleep | eHow

11 Healthy Habits to Improve Your Sleep | eHow | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
“Getting a good night of interrupted slumber is a fantasy that eludes many, forcing them to find relief in over-the-counter or prescription medications. But there are natural, healthier remedies that can be part of any restless insomniac’s daily routine. Implementing some around-the-clock habits will help send you off to dreamland without...”
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Protect Heart with These Heart Healthy Foods

Protect Heart with These Heart Healthy Foods | Fitness, Health, Running and Weight loss | Scoop.it
“ Heart is one of the major organs in our human body. So it is our duty to protect it and it can be easily done by changing some of our food habits and life style It is difficult for us to suddenly c...”
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rojer william's curator insight, September 14, 2013 12:16 AM

Heart is one of the major organs in our human body. So it is our duty to protect it and it can be easily done by changing some of our food habits and life style