2011 Japan Earthquake and its Effects
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2011 Japan Earthquake and its Effects
2011 Japan Earthquake and its Effects
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Tsunami, earthquake, nuclear crisis – now Japan faces power cuts

Tsunami, earthquake, nuclear crisis  – now Japan faces power cuts | 2011 Japan Earthquake and its Effects | Scoop.it

"As aftershocks continued to shake the coast, the Foreign Office urged Britons to avoid all non-essential travel to Tokyo and the north-east of Japan, while the US state department recommended that Americans stay away from Japan."

Sindy Rivera's insight:

The disaster in Japan had such a big affect on other countries, the author used parallelism to explain things authorities had enforced. Concerned for their citizens safety dealing with the nuclear crisis and earthquake effects, "As aftershocks continued to shake the coast, the Foreign Office urged Britons to avoid all non-essential travel to Tokyo and the north-east of Japan, while the US  state department recommended that Americans stay away from Japan"(Branigan). Parallelism, here, explains the acitons authorities are taking as an effort to keep people out of harms way. They had plenty of reason tho worry though, as an other example of parallelism shows, "The Japanese meteorological agency warned that there was a 70% possibility of a magnitude 7 or greater tremor during the next three days. It lifted the tsunami warning, but cautioned that aftershocks could cause further waves"(Branigan). Those were some posibilties the US and other countries were hoping their citizens would avoid by not traveling to Japan. Brenigan used parallelism, like many authors, to explain some of the actions authorities took in order to keep their people safe.

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Timeline: How Japan's nuclear crisis unfolded

Timeline: How Japan's nuclear crisis unfolded | 2011 Japan Earthquake and its Effects | Scoop.it

Three of the plant's six reactors, which came into service between 1970 and 1979, were already shut down for inspection at the time the disaster struck. Those still in operation are designed to also shut down in the event of a quake, with diesel generators pumping water around the reactors to keep them cool.

Sindy Rivera's insight:

Often, an author uses parallelism to inform audiences about certain situations; much like this author who, is letting people know more information about the nuclear crisis in Japan. Here, Jones explains how the reactors in the poweplant should work during an emergency using parallelism to help the audience visualizre the precess. "Three of the plant's six reactors, which came into service between 1970 and 1979, were already shut down for inspection at the time the disaster struck. Those still in operation are designed to also shut down in the event of a quake, with diesel generators pumping water around the reactors to keep them cool"(Jones), that process is specific to how the plant reacts to an earthquake and an earthquake only. No one considered what would happen if something like a tsunami struck, "But when the tsunami hits, flood water swamps the generators, causing them to fail. The reactors begin to heat up"(Jones). This example of parallelism explains to readers what happened to the reactors once it was hit by the tsunami. It caused a scare all over the world and some even say this nuclear crisis was more dangerous than Chernobyl. Parallelism is sometimes used to inform readers about situations, which is what the author chose to incorporate in this article about Japan's nuclear crisis.

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Powerful Quake and Tsunami Devastate Northern Japan

Powerful Quake and Tsunami Devastate Northern Japan | 2011 Japan Earthquake and its Effects | Scoop.it

"Thousands of homes were destroyed, many roads were impassable, trains and buses were not running, and power and cellphones remained down."

Sindy Rivera's insight:

           Parallelism in this passage informs the readers about a few of the damages that the earthquake in Japan caused. The earthquake had a huge impact on Japan and other parts of the world and the author wanted to give readers insight about some of the damages that came with it." Thousands of homes were distroyed, many roads were impassible, trains and buses were not running, and power and cellphones remained down"(Fackler). Those are only a few examples of how the earthquake affected the island of Japan and left people stranded without any means of communication. In this next excerpt, parallelism is once again used to inform readers about some of the effects the earthquake had. "Train service was shut down across central and northern Japan, including Tokyo, and air travel was severely disrupted"(Fackler). Getting in and out of Japan became diffuclt by any means. Fackler uses parallelism throughout his article to help people comprehend the damages that the earthquake triggered.

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Japan quake, tsunami cause 'major damage' - World - CBC News

Japan quake, tsunami cause 'major damage' - World - CBC News | 2011 Japan Earthquake and its Effects | Scoop.it

"The 8.9-magnitude earthquake triggered a deadly tsunami that washed far inland, swamping towns, sweeping away a train and sparking massive fires that burned through the night."

Sindy Rivera's insight:

           The people in Japan suffered a devestating blow due to the unexpected 8.9 magnitude earthquake. If the earthquake alone was not enough to cause extensive damage, it also "...triggered a deadly tsunami that washed far inland..."(CBC News), and spread as far as the west coast concerning the people from west Canada, U.S., and Mexico as well as Japan. This particular author incorporated parallelism into this passage to give people an idea of just how aweful the disaster was. Including examples such as cars being washed away and fires starting throughout the island(CBC News) only added to the effect and made people feel a sense of remorse towards the victims affected. Natural disasters, like this earthquake, can really change a persons life, especially one of a 8.9 magnitude.

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Japanese earthquake causes catastrophic damage - World Socialist Web Site

Japanese earthquake causes catastrophic damage - World Socialist Web Site | 2011 Japan Earthquake and its Effects | Scoop.it

"Many hundreds of people are feared dead and thousands made homeless after the strongest earthquake ever to hit Japan. Yesterday’s magnitude-8.9 quake—the seventh largest recorded in world history—has caused catastrophic damage, especially across northern Japan."

Sindy Rivera's insight:

In many cases, such as talking about the damage Japan's 2011 earthquake caused, authors use pathos to appeal to a reader's emotions. This specific example uses pathos to make readers get a sense of sorrow towards victims of the horrible disaster by saying "Many hundreds of people are feared dead ad thousands made homeless after the strongest earthquake ever to hit Japan. Yesterday's magnitude-8.9 quake--the seventh largest recorded in world history-- has cause catastrophic damage, especially across northern Japan"(Head). Readers will show a sense of remorse to residents of Japan after reading this author example of pathos. Especially because of head's use of the words "Many hundreds...feared dead...thousands made homeless...largest recorded in world history...catastrophic damage"(Head), which only add to the effect of trying to appeal to the reader's emotions. Japan's 2011 earthquake is one example of when authors chose to include pathos to appeal to their reader's feelings.

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Magnitude 9.0 - NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN

Magnitude 9.0 - NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN | 2011 Japan Earthquake and its Effects | Scoop.it

"At least 1,800 houses destroyed when a dam failed in Fukushima. Maximum acceleration of 2.93 g recorded at Tsukidate. Horizontal displacement and subsidence observed. Landslides occurred in Miyagi. Liquefaction observed at Chiba, Odaiba, Tokyo and Urayasu."

Sindy Rivera's insight:

              To let people know about some of the chain-reaction effects the earthquake in Japan created, the author of this article included the use of parallelism to help show examples of how one thing led to an other. Reactions like this happened in multiple places and included things from the earthquake triggering a tsunami to " At least 1,800 houses destroyed when a dam failed in Fukushima. Maximum acceleration of 2.93 g recorded at Tsukidate. Horizontal displacement nad subsidence observed. Landslides occured in Miyagi. Liquefaction observed at Chiba, Odaiba, Tokyou and Urayasu"(Magnitude 9.0...). Parallelism here shows several different things that occured because of the earthquake or because of things the earthquake caused. As mentioned earlier, the earthquake caused an earthquake which in turn endangered areas as far as the west coast. "The tsunami destroyed or severely damaged many coastal towns in the Kuji-Minamisanriku-Nami area. One person killed and several    houses destroyed at Jayapura, Indonesia by a tsunami with a wave    height of 2 m. One person killed south of Crescent City, California and several boats and docks destroyed or damaged at Crescent City by a tsunami with a recorded wave height of 247 cm. Several houses, boats and docks destroyed or damaged at Santa Cruz, California..."(Magnitude 9.0...). In this example of parallelism, the author gives the readers even more insight about the damages the unexected earthquake caused. The chain-reaction effects the earthquake in Japan caused were extensive and affected the whole world, which is the reason why the author gives the readers examples using parallelism.

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Massive 8.9 Earthquake Rocks Japan, Tsunamis Follow

Massive 8.9 Earthquake Rocks Japan, Tsunamis Follow | 2011 Japan Earthquake and its Effects | Scoop.it
TOKYO -- A ferocious tsunami spawned by one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded slammed Japan's eastern coast Friday, killing hundreds of people as it swept away boats, cars and homes while widespread fires burned out of control.
Sindy Rivera's insight:

             Often times, authors use pathos to appeal to a person's emotions; this time it was to show how horrendous the 2011 tsunami was.  After an earthquake strikes, it is bound to have some sort of after effect on the area, in this case, it created a deadly, nearly 30 foot tall tsunami. The earthquake alone left hundres people injured missing or dead, and the tsunami only added to the equation "...killing hundreds of people as it swept away boats, cars and homes..."(Japan...). Damages caused by the earthquake were only worsened by the tsunami it caused. All in all, it left even more people in horrendous situations and caused a scare in places as far as the west coast. Pathos was used in this passage as a way to appeal to the reader's emotions and concerns about the event. The author used prhases such as "...ferocious...larges...killing hundreds...out of control"(Japan...), as a way to give the audience a sort of understanding of how devestating this chain reaction really was. A 30 foot tall tsunami is not only dangerous, but it can leave beind awful results as it did in Japan, as demonstrated in this excerpt.

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