1930sHooverVilles
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1930sHooverVilles
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1 : website reveiw - women on the home front

1 : website reveiw - women on the home front | 1930sHooverVilles | Scoop.it
Research Guides. Women and the Home Front During World War II. Overview.
Cle'ianna Garrett's insight:

Although World War II began in Europe in early September of 1939, the United States did not join until December 8, 1941, after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Entering the war drastically changed the United States economy, and the nation immediately demanded more from its men and women. Since women's participation in the war effort was essential for an Allied victory, gender roles were dramatically altered, at least temporarily. While some women joined the new female branches of the military, many of those who stayed at home went to work in factories and filled other traditionally male jobs while their husbands, fathers, boyfriends, brothers, and sons left to fight. Many women who did not fight or work for pay chose to volunteer their time and energies for the war effort.

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Vocabulary

Vocabulary | 1930sHooverVilles | Scoop.it
Cle'ianna Garrett's insight:

1. HooverVilles – was the popular name for shanty towns built by homeless people during the great depression

2. Lumberjack – a person who fells trees, cuts them into logs, or transports them to a sawmill

3. Stock Market – a stock exchange

4. Shanty – a small, crudely built shack

5. Economic – justified in terms of probability

6. Unemployed – of a person without a paid job but available to work

7. Homelessness – the state or condition of having no home, especially the state of living in the streets

8. Widespread – found or distributed over a large area or number of people

9. Booming – having a period of great prosperity or rapid economic growth

10. Depression – a condition of mental disturbance, typically with lack of energy and difficulty in maintaining concentration or interest in life 

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Primary document 2

A Chicago boy's life on the road in 1932, looking for work in California during the height of the Great Depression. Henry Koczur landed a job fighting fires at 20 cents and hour plus all he could eat.
Cle'ianna Garrett's insight:

"In Saugus, California, I was bumming a house for something to eat, when a forest ranger drove up in an ambulance. He told me to climb in. I asked where we were going. 'To fight a fire,' he said. He commandeered more men on the way up the mountain road. What authority did he have to do this? I asked. If the governor himself happened on the scene, he could force him to fight the fire, he said.

"We arrived at a camp, where a ranger handed me a double-bladed ax and a three-quart canteen of water. We hiked up a mountain in the Castiac Canyon. When I got to the top, it looked as though the whole world was on fire.

"We started to build fire trails from the top of the mountain to the bottom. Men behind us threw the brush to the side, so the fire wouldn't leap across the trail but it always did.

"One of the rangers, a Captain Durham, sent for a water tanker. We ran two-inch hoses from the truck to the fire and cut a new trail. Captain Durham told me to take two lengths of hose to a ranger, who was wetting down the brush. I was on my way to him, when another ranger ran up to me, telling me to drop everything and run for my life.

"Captain Durham showed disappointment, when he learned I'd dropped the hoses. After the fire passed us, I went back to retrieve them. All I could find were four chrome-plated hose ends.

"I didn't think we could put out that fire, but then the wind changed and helped us extinguish it. We remained on patrol for a few days, looking for any sign of smoke and covering the embers with dirt.

"I worked 12 hours a day for 20 cents an hour, very good wages then. And, boy, did we eat good, as much as we wanted, bacon and eggs for breakfast, meat and beans for supper. When the fire was put out and the work ended, we learned we would have to wait 30 days for our pay checks. I buddied up with a fellow named Jensen from Escanaba, Michigan. We decided we would go to Yuma, Arizona in the meantime.


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website Connecting to today 2

website Connecting to today 2 | 1930sHooverVilles | Scoop.it
Cle'ianna Garrett's insight:

The State of Homelessness in America 2012 examines homelessness between 2009 and 2011, a period of economic downturn in the nation. The report shows that despite the bad economy, homelessness decreased by 1 percent during this period. The decrease was likely due to a significant investment of federal resources to prevent homelessness and quickly re-house people who did become homeless. The Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP, funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009) was a $1.5 billion federal effort to prevent a recession-related increase in homelessness. It was built upon ground-breaking work at the federal level and in jurisdictions across the nation to improve the homelessness system by adopting evidence-based, cost effective interventions. In 2010, its first year of operation, it assisted nearly 700,000 at-risk and homeless people. This report provides evidence that it was successful in achieving its goal of preventing a significant increase in homelessness.

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Historical Website 3

Historical Website 3 | 1930sHooverVilles | Scoop.it
As unemployment grew to epic proportions during the Great Depression, thousands of people lost their homes.
Cle'ianna Garrett's insight:

In 1930, unemployment was at an all-time high. In Muncie, Indiana, three out of four people had lost a job and had not been able to find a new one. In Lowell, Massachusetts, writer Louis Adamic wrote that thousands of unemployed “walked around like ghosts or were hiding away in their shacks and small rooms.” A labor union official reported that two thirds of the city’s textile workers were idle or employed only part-time.

 

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Historical Website 1

Historical Website 1 | 1930sHooverVilles | Scoop.it
Cle'ianna Garrett's insight:

During the fall and winter of 1931 and 1932, unemployed workers established Seattle’s "Hooverville," a shantytown named in sarcastic honor of U.S. President Herbert Hoover (1874-1964), on whose beat the Great Depression began. In October 1931, an unemployed lumberjack by the name of Jesse Jackson and 20 others started building shacks on vacant land owned by the Port of Seattle located a few blocks south of Pioneer Square.

 

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Primary Document 3

Primary Document 3 | 1930sHooverVilles | Scoop.it
Hoovervilles in the Great Depression The Black Crowes – Oh Sweet Nuthin  A Hooverville was the popular name for a shanty town, examples of which were found in many United States communities d...
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Primary Document 1

Three boys who hit the road in the Great Depression learn a lesson the hard way, picking cotton in Mississippi for 75 cents a 100 pounds. A week's work earned Claude Franlklin 35 cents!
Cle'ianna Garrett's insight:

The Great Depression still plagued the entire United States. My family was having a hard time making ends meet, but I wasn't unhappy with my home life. I'd developed a wanderlust, hearing my two oldest brothers talk about riding freight trains to other states.

"The night before our departure, we put our extra clothes in paper sacks, sneaked them out of the house and buried them under bushes. We didn't want to carry a bundle or bag. That would be a dead giveaway.

"We set out after church on Sunday, and headed for the Texas and Pacific Railroad yards on the west side of Fort Worth.

"We knew our mothers would be worried sick, but we didn't leave a note. We didn't want them to stop us. What a cruel thing to do on Mother's Day!"

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Website Connecting to today 1

Website Connecting to today 1 | 1930sHooverVilles | Scoop.it
Reminiscent of the Great Depression, encampments of homeless people are growing in such cities as Fresno, Calif.
Cle'ianna Garrett's insight:

Like a dozen or so other cities across the nation, Fresno is dealing with an unhappy déjà vu: the arrival of modern-day Hoovervilles, illegal encampments of homeless people that are reminiscent, on a far smaller scale, of Depression-era shantytowns. At his news conference on Tuesday night, President Obama was asked directly about the tent cities and responded by saying that it was “not acceptable for children and families to be without a roof over their heads in a country as wealthy as ours.”

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Historical Website 2

Historical Website 2 | 1930sHooverVilles | Scoop.it
seattle, exhibits
Cle'ianna Garrett's insight:

The stock market crash in October 1929 helped trigger a devastating depression that dominated the Northwest for nearly a decade. The economic downturn gradually affected more and more people. Mortgage foreclosures, delinquent taxes, and sharply rising unemployment were the experiences of many. Between 1929 and 1933, a hundred thousand businesses failed across the nation. Racial minorities, women, and the unskilled were the first to lose their jobs. By the time President Hoover left office in 1933, 13 million were unemployed, about 25% of the work force. Some unemployed became transients, searching for jobs and food. In Seattle, unemployment was 11% in April 1930, rising to 26% by January 1935.

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