1920s Art Deco Design and Architecture
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1920s Art Deco Design and Architecture
1920s Art, Deco Design, and Architecuture
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Modern Art: A Source of Inspiration for Designers

Modern Art: A Source of Inspiration for Designers | 1920s Art Deco Design and Architecture | Scoop.it

It was the time period from 1860s to 1970s when modern art was the most prevailing artistic work that denotes the philosophy of the art fashioned in that era. Modern art was basically an experiment to visualize the nature of material and functions of art in an absolutely new way with fresh idea. Modern art is characterized by the intensity of conceptualization, as the art was all about to implement the idea and concept in a new way. At present, the current artistic invention is often called contemporary art or postmodern art.

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Iconic Legends: The 10 Greatest Modern Architects of Our Time

Iconic Legends: The 10 Greatest Modern Architects of Our Time | 1920s Art Deco Design and Architecture | Scoop.it

The role architecture plays in our everyday lives is astronomical. From the cool houses we marvel at on Freshome’s pages to historical & iconic buildings that we recognize instantly

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Deco

Deco | 1920s Art Deco Design and Architecture | Scoop.it

"The economic and social pressures that immediately followed the First World War brought with them a new mood for a rigorous and clean-cut look. Art Deco was an innovative design style popular in the 1920s and 1930s. Its sleek, streamlined forms conveyed elegance and sophistication. It was the age of the Flapper, the Jazz and the Machine Age. Materials used ranged from rubies, gold, and pearls to plastic, chrome and steel. Platinum was the new luxury metal used with opaque stones like coral, jade, onyx and lapis lazuli. Costume jewelry became even more popular and outrageous. Trend-setting couturiers were Coco Chanel6 and Elsa Schiaparelli. Influences were Pharaonic Egypt, the Orient, tribal Africa, Cubism, Futurism, machines and graphic design. However, jewelry of the 1920's and 30's was in thrall to geometry: circles, arcs, squares, rectangles and triangles and so on. René Lalique, who created glass jewelry in the 1920's and 30's, created romantic designs from nature."

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1920's Art

1920's Art | 1920s Art Deco Design and Architecture | Scoop.it
1920's Art plus information on Artists and Illustrators...

The Surrealists developed techniques such as automatic drawing (developed by André Masson), automatic painting, decalcomania, frottage, fumage, grattage and parsemage that became significant parts of Surrealist practice.

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Modern & Art Deco Living Rooms

Modern & Art Deco Living Rooms | 1920s Art Deco Design and Architecture | Scoop.it

One of the main criticisms about the ultra modernstyle of decor is that they can appear a bit too stark or sterile at times and can lack ‘feeling’. But this set of living rooms from Spanish firmdoes a fine balancing act by giving us a strong feel of the Art Deco style that Mobilfresno prevailed in the 1920s and yet retaining the modern look.

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1920's Residential and Commercial Architecture

1920's Residential and Commercial Architecture | 1920s Art Deco Design and Architecture | Scoop.it
Articles on 1920's Residential Housing and Commercial Buildings taken from Period Publications...

1920's architecture was characterised by improved standards in residential home building for the masses and also the proliferation of the skyscraper for commercial buildings.

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André Masson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

André-Aimé-René Masson (4 January 1896 – 28 October 1987) was a French artist.

Masson was born in Balagny-sur-Thérain, Oise, but was brought up in Belgium. He began his study of art at the age of eleven in Brussels, at the Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts under the guidance of Constant Montald, and later he studied in Paris. He fought for France during World War I and was seriously injured.

His early works display an interest in cubism. He later became associated with surrealism, and he was one of the most enthusiastic employers of automatic drawing, making a number of automatic works in pen and ink. Masson would often force himself to work under strict conditions, for example, after long periods of time without food or sleep, or under the influence of drugs. He believed forcing himself into a reduced state of consciousness would help his art be free from rational control, and hence get closer to the workings of his subconscious mind.[citation needed]

He was an Artist

"From around 1926 he experimented by throwing sand and glue onto canvas and making oil paintings based around the shapes that formed."

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