1920's Stockmarket & Credit
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1920's Stockmarket & Credit
How was the stockmarket and credit in the 1920's
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Find out how strong your vocabulary is and learn new words at Vocabulary.com.

Find out how strong your vocabulary is and learn new words at Vocabulary.com. | 1920's Stockmarket & Credit | Scoop.it
Vocabulary.com helps you learn new words, play games that improve your vocabulary, and explore language.
Ironman The'Gee Robinson's insight:

Stock Market: The market in which shares are issued and traded either through exchanges or over-the-counter markets.


Credit: The ability to obtain goods or services before payment, based on the trust that payment will be made in the future: "unlimited credit".

Debt: Something, typically money, that is owed or due: "I paid off my debts".
Depression: Severe despondency and dejection, accompanied by feelings of hopelessness and inadequacy.

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The Stock Market Crash of 1929

The Stock Market Crash of 1929 | 1920's Stockmarket & Credit | Scoop.it
After a boom on the stock market that enticed many everyday people to invest their entire savings, the stock market crashed on October 29, 1929.
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Prosperity, America in the 1920s, Primary Sources for Teachers, America in Class, National Humanities Center

Prosperity, America in the 1920s, Primary Sources for Teachers, America in Class, National Humanities Center | 1920's Stockmarket & Credit | Scoop.it

 

In a 1925 political cartoon, a confident Uncle Sam stands atop the "Peak of Prosperity," hoisting a triumphant banner labeled "Highest Standard of Living in the History of the World." Behind him, on a pile of ancient ruins, stands Ancient Rome, calling out to Uncle Sam to "Watch your step!" In mid decade, however, it seemed unthinkable to most Americans that the nation's astounding prosperity was unstable, that its rebound from the severe postwar depression was heading anywhere but up. After all, Americans were producing, selling, advertising, consuming, embracing credit—and investing "on margin" in the stock market—with unquenchable enthusiasm. Amidst the ballyhoo and genuine pride, words of warning were acknowledged, then forgotten. "We have today in these United States," asserted black leader W. E. B. Du Bois, "cheek by jowl, Prosperity and Depression." Many Americans had been left behind in the boisterous expansion of the middle class, especially farmers, factory laborers, and minorities. Union labor campaigned for legitimacy and a "living wage," often resorting to strikes which antagonized the general public and fueled anxiety that the nation was under attack from subversive radicals and anarchists. A sinister "us vs. them" cloud hovered in the otherwise blue skies of American confidence. Not all was well. Ancient Rome warned, "Watch your step."*

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