18th Amendment & Volstead Act Lester Nunnally
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Two Paragraph Essay

 

Two Paragraph Essay

 

 

In the early 1900s, many people like the temperance society didn’t like alcohol. They were mainly women who fought against the manufacture and selling of liquor.  Vote yes was a lot of people with signs and posters to persuade people to vote yes for prohibition. U.S. was a legally Dry Nation that outlawed the manufacture and distribution of alcoholic beverages. On December 18, 1917 they made prohibition a National law. Which made the manufacture and distribution of alcoholic beverages illegal in the U.S. Bootleggers smuggled alcohol into the U.S. and sold them to make money. A lot of gangs committed crimes due to alcohol being illegal. On February 20, 1933 the 21st amendment repealed the 18th amendment. That made alcohol legal in all the states again. After all the fight and effort they still made alcohol legal after 13 years of being dry.

 

While prohibition was in effect, many families didn’t have money to feed their families. Wives and children begged their father to stop using all there money to buy alcohol. Crime was getting out of hand due to alcohol being banned. People needed jobs, and gangsterism was the easiest was to make money when they made alcohol illegal. They used different tactics to sell and buy alcohol in store and on the streets. They got smart by putting fake labels on bottles and selling illegal alcohol that way. When they made alcohol legal again the crime had went down drastically. They even arrested one of the most famous criminals at the time Al Capone who had a big influence on most of the crime happening for a long period of time. Due to liquor being legal people where happy and threw party to celebrate. They even had parades dedicated to alcohol for the 12 years that it was banned in the U.S

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Vocabulary

1.keg- A small barrel esp. One of less than 30 gallons
* Carry Nation destroyed kegs of alcohol to fight the manufacture of alcohol.
2. Prohibition- The action of forbidding something, by law
* Many people caught for prohibition in the United States.
3. Temperance- abstinence from alcoholic drinks
* Temperance groups didn't like the selling of alcohol.
4. Constitution- Established precedents according to which a state or other organization is acknowledged to be governed
* House of Representatives wanted to make prohibition the 18th Amendment of the constitution.
5. Intoxicate- To lose control of their faculties or behavior
* Many people intoxicate themselves at local bars.
6. Brewery- A place where beer is made commercially
*Brewery is another word for bar.
7. Volstead Act- Law that enforced alcohol prohibition in the U.S. during 1920-33
* The Volstead Act banned liquor in the United States.
8. Ban- Officially or legally Prohibit
* For a long period of time many people tried to ban the production of alcohol.
9. Amendment- A minor change in a document
* The Amendment is a article added to the constitution.
10. Vehemently- Showing strong feeling; forceful, passionate, or intense
* Lots of people where famous for being vehemently against alcohol.
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Carrie Amelia Moore Nation (1846–1911) - Encyclopedia of Arkansas Primary #2

Carrie Amelia Moore Nation (1846–1911) - Encyclopedia of Arkansas Primary #2 | 18th Amendment & Volstead Act Lester Nunnally | Scoop.it
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Carrie Nation was a a temperance advocate and famous for showing strong feelings against alcohol. Her parents didnt approve of her getting married because Charles Gloyd her fiance was an alcoholic. In 1877 Carrie started tospeak against tobacco and alcohol, she really hated alcohol. He carries around a hatchet and destroyed kegs of beer and whiskey. I think she was doing the right thing to fight against the thing that made her first marriage not work.

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Alcohol Prohibition Today #2

Alcohol Prohibition Today #2 | 18th Amendment & Volstead Act Lester Nunnally | Scoop.it
Alcohol prohibition was a failure in 1920. There are still some places that enforce these archaic laws.
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The Rise and Fall of Prohibition in Baltimore, Maryland, 1918-1933 #3

The Rise and Fall of Prohibition in Baltimore, Maryland, 1918-1933 #3 | 18th Amendment & Volstead Act Lester Nunnally | Scoop.it

The constitutional enactment of national prohibition in 1920 and its progressive aim of uplifting American society only lasted until 1933. Public opinion evolved in those thirteen years from supporting national prohibition to denouncing the attempt at legislating morals. Prohibition has generally been ridiculed in American history as a failure. No other state defines the failure of prohibition better than the State of Maryland from 1918-1933, especially in the defiant urban center of Baltimore.

Maryland was unique in its reactions to prohibition. It was the only state to never pass a state enforcement act, proudly labeling itself as a wet state. Prohibition in Maryland was seen as an infringement on states’ rights to enforce and control liquor traffic within its borders. Therefore, national prohibition would not be supported by the infringed upon state.

Between 1920 and 1933, the U.S. was legally a dry nation. Prohibition attempted to outlaw the manufacture and distribution of alcoholic and intoxicating beverages. Historians have generally agreed that those who led the prohibition movement were the middle-class reformers who were often the activists in the progressive movement. Since alcohol was deemed by these people to be one of the most prodigious evils that plagued the lives of Americans, the eradication of alcohol was initially a colossal victory.

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The Volstead Act #1

The Volstead Act #1 | 18th Amendment & Volstead Act Lester Nunnally | Scoop.it

The National Archives Digital Classroom: Primary Sources, Activities and Training for Educators and Students.

 

Issues over alcohol and drugs became a big issue in the 20th century. Women formed organizations to ban alcohol and drugs, their main reason was to save money. Often times the man would go out to spend money, while leaving no money left to provide for their family. Second supporters were Factory owners. Only because of the new work habits which required industrial workers to work early mornings and long nights. Once the amendment passed it began to work at first. But, people began to find ways to evade prohibition agents. They carried false books and hollowed cranes. I think that during the 1920's was a chaotic time in the United States. They began to have addictions to useless products and lost some sense of morals.

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Prohibition Video — History.com Primary #3

Prohibition Video — History.com Primary #3 | 18th Amendment & Volstead Act Lester Nunnally | Scoop.it
Find out more about the Prohibition era, when the manufacture and sale of alcohol was banned in the United States.
lester nunnally's insight:

United States were trying to get red of alcohol for 70 years and they finally put a end to it in 1919. People thought that alcohol made people dumber and lower themselves as individuals. They blamed violence and community problems on alcohol. Temperance Group have been trying to influence the Government to ban alcohol but they didnt so they toke it into thier own hands, women like Carrie Nation faught against the manufacture of alcohol. I think they were fighting for a good cause to stop them from selling alcohol and to better the environment around us.

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The Constitution of the United States: Amendments 11-27 Primary #1

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On December 18, 1917 the 18th amendment was set in affect. They put this in the amendment to prevent the manufacture of alcohol. Many people like that they made it illegal so they have money for thier families. Other people didn't like that they made it illegal because they like to drink alcohol. I think they should have keep it illegal so the society and people will improve.
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Drinking Driving Today #1

Drinking Driving Today #1 | 18th Amendment & Volstead Act Lester Nunnally | Scoop.it
The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. (NCADD) provides education, information, help and hope to the public.
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The Volstead Act #2

Andrew Volstead, a leading Republican member of the House of Representatives, was the author of the National Prohibition Act (also known as the Volstead Act) that was passed by Congress in 1919. The law prohibited the manufacture, transportation and sale of beverages containing more than 0.5 per cent alcohol. The act was condemned by a large number of the American population who considered it a violation of their constitutional rights.
As Frederick Lewis Allen pointed out: "The Government provided a force of prohibition agents which in 1920 numbered only 1,520 men and as late as 1930 numbered over 2,836. The agents' salaries in 1920 mostly ranged between $1,200 and $2,000; by 1930 they had been munificently raised to range between $2,300 and $2,800. Anybody who believed that men employable at 35 to 40 or 50 dollars a week would surely have the expert technical knowledge and the diligence to supervise successfully the complicated chemical operations of industrial-alcohol plants or to outwit the craftiest devices of smugglers to resist corruption by men whose pockets were bulging with money, would be ready to believe also in Santa Claus, perpetual motion and pixies."
One of the consequences of the National Prohibition Act was the development of gangsterism and crime. Enforcement of prohibition was a difficult task and a growth in illegal drinking places took place. People called moonshiners distilled alcohol illegally. Bootleggers sold the alcohol and also imported it from abroad. The increase in criminal behaviour caused public opinion to turn against prohibition. In 1933 prohibition was repealed by the adoption of the 21st Amendment.
In the 1932 Presidential Election, the Democratic Party candidate, Franklin D. Roosevelt, promised an early end to prohibition. In February 1933, Congress voted to repeal the Eighteenth Amendment. While the Twenty-first Amendment was making its way through the states, Roosevelt requested quick action to amend the Volstead Act by legalizing beer of 3.2 per cent alcoholic content by weight. Within a week both houses passed the beer bill, and added wine for good measure. On 22nd March 1933, Roosevelt signed the bill.
William E. Leuchtenburg, the author of Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal (1963), commented: "On April 7, 1933, beer was sold legally in America for the first time since the advent of prohibition, and the wets made the most of it. In New York, six stout brewery horses drew a bright red Busch stake wagon to the Empire State Building, where a case of beer was presented to Al Smith (the defeated Democratic candidate who opposed prohibition in 1928). In the beer town of St. Louis, steam whistles and sirens sounded by midnight, while Wisconsin Avenue in Milwaukee was blocked by mobs of celebrants standing atop cars and singing Sweet Adeline."

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