18th Amendment & Volstead Act
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18th Amendment & Volstead Act
National Prohibition Act
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Vocabulary Words

Ratified: to sign

 

Jurisdiction: official power to make legal decisions; judgments

 

Concurrent: done at the same time

 

Temperance: abstinence of alcoholic drink

 

Volstead Act: a law that enforced alcohol prohibition in the U.S

 

Bootleg: made, distributed, or sold illegally

 

Prohibition: the action of forbidding something

 

Intoxicate: to lose control of your behaviors

 

Speakeasies: establishment that illegally sells alcoholic beverages

 

Implementation: the process of putting a decision or plan into effect

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Primary Document #2: Letter concerning the transportation of liquor from California to Washington. 02/21/1928

Last September “Sailor Jack” was apprehended while transporting alcohol along the Pacific highway new Medford, Oregon, by Prohibition Agent, Terry A. Tallent. Subsequent to that arrest “Sailor Jack” acted as an informant for Tallent, but at the same time he attempted to get his own loads of liquor past the officers. Finally “Sailor Jack” jumped state bonds, and disappeared.

 

It is now our information, form a very reliable source, that “Sailor Jack” is running alcohol from San Francisco to Crescent City, California. He is reported to be using the name of P. Rex in Crescent City, and is stopping at a hotel, the name of which we have not yet learned, with a man by the name of Byore.

 

Prohibition Agent Tallent states that if any one were to get “Sailor Jack” in a “tight place” he would tell all he knows about the transportation of alcohol from San Francisco to various Pacific Coast Points. It is requested that an effort be made to locate “Sailor Jack”, and to interview him regarding the alcohol traffic.

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Issues of Today #2: Drinking and Driving

Issues of Today #2: Drinking and Driving | 18th Amendment & Volstead Act | Scoop.it

Drinking and driving do not go together because the brain can’t function right when alcohol is in your system. This shows the different types of BAC (blood alcohol concentration)

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Historical Website #3 The Rise and Fall of Prohibition in Baltimore, Maryland, 1918-1933

Historical Website #3 The Rise and Fall of Prohibition in Baltimore, Maryland, 1918-1933 | 18th Amendment & Volstead Act | Scoop.it

Baltimore, Maryland was the only state that the Volstead Act was irrelevant. 

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Two Paragraph Essay

12 sentence paragraphs
Vernice Belcher's insight:

(FIRST PARAGRAPH) In the early 1900s, many Americans thought that distributing alcohol beverages was a violation to their constitutional rights. They came to consider that prohibition would reduce crime, corruption, social problems, as well as improve health and hygiene. In fact, these people who wanted to ban alcohol were known as the American Temperance Society, which had reached about 1.5 million members. Thus, the 18th amendment was ratified to the United States Constitution on January 29, 1919. It prohibited the manufacture, sale, transport, import, or export of alcoholic beverages. Andrew Volstead, who was a member of the United States House of Representatives, was concerned about the growing consumption of alcohol, which lead him to create the National Prohibition Act, or better known as the Volstead Act. On January 16, 1920, the law went into full effect. This law was made to enforce the 18th amendment. In other words, it states the effects of consuming alcohol, and how or if it should be used. Section 29 of the Volstead Acts reads “anyone who manufactures or sells liquor shall be fine no more than $1,000, or be imprisoned no more than 6 months.” Government officials tried there hardest to enforce this law, but things didn’t turn out how they thought it would.

 

 

 

(SECOND PARAGRAPH) With prohibition in full effect, it was now illegal to manufacture, sell, or transport alcohol. Quote made by Billy Sunday “we will turn our prisons into factories and turn jails into store houses. Women will smile and children will laugh.” Like Billy Sunday, most people anticipated that prohibition would make America a better place, but the events took a much different course. Crimes started to gradually increase, prisons were becoming full, and outfits began. Soon people began “bootlegging” which meant that they were selling alcohol illegally. Countless amount of alcohol were brought in from Canada, sold from an operation known as Speakeasies. The government not only had to deal with citizens and gangsters breaking the law, they also had to deal with an enormous amount of corruption within their own system. Most gangsters bribed the government officials with money in order to keep their mouths shut. One of the most famous gangsters was Al Capone. Although Capone was openly known as a bootlegger, he never got arrested for breaking the 18th amendment. However, during this decade thousands of arrests were made and the nation was going out of control. This whole prohibition led to the St. Valentines day massacre. After this tragedy, the government realized that they failed to enforce the law. The only solution was to repeal the 18th amendment. It was repealed on December 5, 1933, which is now the 21st amendment to the United States Constitution.

 

 

 

With the 21st amendment making alcohol legal again, crime and corruption began to decrease, as well as new job opportunities were expanding. Today, there are still some counties in the United States that ban alcohol for various reasons.

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Primary Document #3: Andrew Volstead

Primary Document #3: Andrew Volstead | 18th Amendment & Volstead Act | Scoop.it

Andrew Volstead was a member of the House of Representatives of the Republican Party. He and some other people participated in forming the Volstead Act of 1919

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Issues of Today #1: Alcohol Prohibition Today

Issues of Today #1: Alcohol Prohibition Today | 18th Amendment & Volstead Act | Scoop.it

There are still some counties today in Kentucky, Arkansas, Oklahomaa, Mississippi, Alamaba, Kansas, and Texas that banned the use of alcohol. 

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Historical Website #2 The Volstead Act

The Volstead Act was made to explain the purpose of the 18th amendment. It states the effects of the use of alcohol, and how or if it should be used.

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