10GEO Urbanisation
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10GEO Urbanisation
Urbanisation, Urban growth, Gentrification
Curated by Robin Irvine
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Norman Foster unveils plans for elevated 'SkyCycle' bike routes in London

Norman Foster unveils plans for elevated 'SkyCycle' bike routes in London | 10GEO Urbanisation | Scoop.it
Plan for 220km network of bike paths suspended above railway lines could see commuters gliding to work over rooftops
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Someone Give This Man A Nobel Prize Already. He’s Going To Save The Planet!

Someone Give This Man A Nobel Prize Already. He’s Going To Save The Planet! | 10GEO Urbanisation | Scoop.it
The one video everyone on this planet needs to see.
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Infrastructure in a Ecological Age

Infrastructure in a Ecological Age | 10GEO Urbanisation | Scoop.it
Originally produced by Arup for the Brunel Lecture Series supported by the Institute of Civil Engineers. Although the city featured is Manchester in the UK, ...
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Abandoning the backyard to move up in the world

Abandoning the backyard to move up in the world | 10GEO Urbanisation | Scoop.it
More families appear to be moving from big houses for high-rise apartments in the inner city.
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New York -- before the City

TED Talks 400 years after Hudson found New York harbor, Eric Sanderson shares how he made a 3D map of Mannahatta's fascinating pre-city ecology of hills, rivers, wildlife -- accurate down to the block -- when Times Square was a wetland and you...

 

KC: The Manhattan Project created a picture of the area before the development of a city, the way Henry Hudson did during his 1609 exploration. After 10 years (1999-2009), the research project has expanded to study the entire city of New York. The Welikia Project analyzes geography and landscape ecology to discover the original environment and compare it to present day. Scientists have learned that world's largest cities once had a natural landscape of freshwater wetlands and salt marshes, ponds and streams, forests and fields with an equally diverse wildlife community. By focusing on the city's biodiversity of 400 years ago and the modern era, information can be gathered about what has changed, what has remained constant, where the city was done well and where it needs to improve. This source is useful because it allows for the visualization of NYC in a way never seen before. Urban environments, such as NYC, have a landscape largely created by humans, so the skyscrapers, pavement, and mass population is far removed from the landscape it once was.

 

Find more information about the Welikia Project at http://welikia.org and more on New York City's urban ecology at: http://www.scoop.it/t/urban-geography


Via Kate C, Seth Dixon
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Kim Vignale's comment, August 12, 2012 2:03 PM
I was surprised on how green NYC is because of all the cars and urban development. I think this project topic is very informative and interesting (makes me want to got to NYC) . I thought it was very interesting how NYC was in the early 1900s and how it became now. I also think it's a great idea how adding more greenery to the urban city will add sort of a rural feel to a big city.
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Statistics open our eyes and we invite you to map the sadness

Statistics open our eyes and we invite you to map the sadness | 10GEO Urbanisation | Scoop.it
Statistics open our eyes and we invite you to map the sadness...
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GCSE Geography - Favela - Ross Kemp Documentary

Episode in Rio de Janeiro. Largest favelas in Brazil. Great for use with GCSE Settlement in LEDC's.
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What Future? New ideas for urban living – video

What Future? New ideas for urban living – video | 10GEO Urbanisation | Scoop.it
Hear what our panel of experts had to say about the future of the built environment at a recent seminar...
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Flexible Urban Planning

mixed used train-tracks/market place...

 

I've used similar videos in my classes and students are usually quite shocked to see how a city like Bangkok, Thailand operates.  I've used this as a 'hook' for lessons of population growth, urbanization, economic development, sustainability, megacities and city planning. 


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Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:15 PM

On the one hand this disturbed me. All I kept thinking when I saw the people go back on the tracks is that they could easily be killed.In fact, I wonder how many accidents have ever occurred near this area. All it would take is some sort of malfunction on the train in which the horn wasn’t sounding to provide ample warning or someone gets in another person’s way so there isn’t enough time to close down the shop. On the other hand, this made me realize just how efficient a population could become at using space. Everything was timed so that the entire area moved out of the way without an issue. So rather than let any land go to waste, the area uses it despite the risk to its population. Though it really isn't like the population has a choice though. So in instances where there is such overpopulation, it is interesting to see how well the society can adapt to the phenomenon. I do wonder what would happen if the country becomes more developed and the population declines. Would this type of land continue in the future or be disband? I know that in our country there are many laws that would make this illegal, but our country also has the space avoid developing the land in such a manner. When comparing it to the laws of the United States, I would think the country would eventually drift away from this use of land when possible. However, now that I watch the video, I have a new appreciation for maximizing land and I hope that the efficient could continue. Just in a less scary manner. 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 2:51 PM

Talk about using every inch of space available to you.  I find this video crazy not only because of the safety hazards, but just how people seem to go about this like it is normal.  This would never take place in America!

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 1:29 PM

An absolute amazing dynamic is seen in this video.  To say that Bangkok is trying to use most of its open space up would be an understatement.  In developed countries, you would not only never see this happen but you would not even see a thought of doing something like this.  There are violations every where you look.  

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The most liveable city?

The most liveable city? | 10GEO Urbanisation | Scoop.it
We locals are smugly satisfied every time Melbourne is named the world's most liveable city, but what does that really mean?
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UK guru maps grand plan for Melbourne parks

UK guru maps grand plan for Melbourne parks | 10GEO Urbanisation | Scoop.it
Design guru Kevin McCloud has proposed a radical plan for Melbourne's parks, suggesting up to 30 per cent of space could be used for communal food production.
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China becomes an urban nation at breakneck speed

China becomes an urban nation at breakneck speed | 10GEO Urbanisation | Scoop.it
With the government seeking to increase domestic demand, places like Guiyang are at the heart of its urbanisation strategy...
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Jeffrey Marzilli's comment, December 17, 2012 2:00 AM
'It is not only the extraordinary speed that is "unprecedented and unparalleled", says Prof Paul James of the Global Cities Institute at RMIT University in Melbourne. "It represents the most managed process of urbanisation in human history.'
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Issues from Global Population Growth

Find In-depth Review, Video And Infographic On World Population. http://www.mapsofworld.com/poll/can-world-population-be-controlled.html Learn more about pop...

 

This video displays some intriguing statistics about global population growth.  Equally important the video explores some concerns that are presented with a large population.  Click on the above link to view all the images as one long infographic.  Admittedly, this video (and most academic literature) approaches the population issue from a strong perspective which advocates for the reduction of total population; if you feel it necessary to have an ideological counterweight in the classroom, this article may be what you are looking for: http://opinion.latimes.com/opinionla/2011/07/overpopulation-dont-buy-more-people-more-problems-blowback.html  


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Mapping Population Density

Mapping Population Density | 10GEO Urbanisation | Scoop.it
I found these cartograms from an article in the Telegraph and was immediately impressed. The cartograms originated here and use data from the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project as to create the int...

 

This series of cartograms shows some imbalanced populations (such as the pictured Australia) by highlighting countries that have established forward capitals.  Question to ponder: Do forward capitals change the demographic regions of a country significantly enough to justify moving the capital? 


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Joe Andrade's curator insight, August 5, 2013 10:21 PM

Interseting way to visualy map population density.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:28 PM

It's a creative and vial way to map population density. 

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:24 AM

This is from 'worldmapper' - it is a great sight to help you understand using technology the most densely populated areas of various countries. What do you think they are? 

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A Chart That Explains the Path to a Global Urban Majority

A Chart That Explains the Path to a Global Urban Majority | 10GEO Urbanisation | Scoop.it
Which countries became at least half urban the fastest?
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Gentrification spelled out

Gentrification spelled out | 10GEO Urbanisation | Scoop.it
As upscale, high-rise condos and hipster bars opened nearby, longtime customers joked: Is this really still “the ’hood”? Not anymore.

 

In a gentrifying neighborhood in Washington D.C. that was historically African-American, Fish in the ’Hood was an iconic restaurant that captured the feel of the area.  Just this May, the storefront restaurant was renamed Fish in the Neighborhood.

Questions to Ponder: Why?  Does it matter?  What does it mean?


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, September 25, 2014 5:35 PM

Gentrification deals with the forcing out of lower income residents and making space available for the more affluent. The re-naming of Fish in the 'Hood shows how gentrification forces the culture  of entire communities to change. Although this restaurant was popular before, they were forced to re-brand so they can stay in business. Gentrification exiles the poor, with that their culture. This restaurant shows that, as more upscale business open up to service the needs of more affluent citizens, any business that has the perception of being the contrary will soon be out of business. This matters because it shows how gentrification destroys communities image, and culture for the sake of increasing revenue and real estate value. What is exhibit here is not only a socio-economic shift but also a racial shift as well. This neighborhood was predominately African American before it began to gentrify, "The 'Hood" is a saying that correlates with African American culture. This restaurant's re-branding shows that they no longer can continue to bring in customers with a name that is part of the African American vernacular. Furthermore, it shows the racial trends that go with gentrification where minority culture is pushed out as more money flows in.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 25, 2015 11:15 AM

The article talks about a restaurant called Fish In The NeighborHood, with emphasis on Hood, that has not been affected by the gentrification that has happened in the area. He still refers to the area as "Hood" even with all the newly built building. The article also describes the process of the gentrification, and people's opinions on the name of the restaurant compared to the area.

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it explains the idea and process of gentrification. It gives an example of how some buildings are unaffected by the gentrified area. 

Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:50 AM

this article is taking the time to plainly spell out what gentrification is and where it is happening. Gentrification means the taking of lowe class land and making it more valuable to try and boost the overall way of life in that area. Most people are blind to this system and should take the time to learn about it.