100 Acre Wood
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100 Acre Wood
Our natural habitat
Curated by David Rowing
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How to Get Rid of Bats

How to Get Rid of Bats | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

I would encourage bats in the garden as they eat many insects and add interest, but if they get under your roof or into your house then you'll probably want to encourage them to leave. How can you do this humanely?

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How To Make Natural Garden Pesticides | Apartment Therapy

How To Make Natural Garden Pesticides | Apartment Therapy | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Garden pests are one of the few things I find frustrating about gardening.

 

Whether it's the snails taking over your lettuce or the aphids sucking on your roses — it's definitely annoying — but not a reason to fret and reach for harmful, toxic sprays. They might eliminate the pesky culprits, but they are harmful to you and the environment. Instead, try whipping up one of these simple recipes with ingredients you most likely have on hand.

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Climate change 'impacts Europe's mountain plants'

Climate change 'impacts Europe's mountain plants' | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"The acceleration of climate change is stressing mountain plants in Europe and driving them to migrate to higher altitudes, according to a study released by US researchers.
The plant migration is also decreasing species diversity, the study's authors said in the April 20 edition of the journal Science.


The study was based on an inventory of flora on 66 mountains between northern Europe and the Mediterranean."

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How to reconnect children with nature

How to reconnect children with nature | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Children today are hardly allowed into the natural world at all, and never without supervision, says Stephen Moss. What can we do to get them back to nature?

 

"But does it really matter if our children are disconnected from the natural world? Well, apart from the obvious benefits to their physical and mental health (there aren't many obese naturalists), there is also the sheer joy that these experiences – often unexpected, sometimes scary, but always fulfilling – bring.

 

There are other, less tangible benefits to getting outdoors. Being allowed to roam free with your friends is a fantastic way to learn about yourself and about risk, which we all appreciate when we climb a tree – and even more so when we fall out. It also teaches children about working together as a team, a valuable lesson for later life."

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Build a Bee Hotel

Build a Bee Hotel | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

With the Honey Bee suffering from Veroa mite Colony Collapse Disorder, the Solitary bees are becoming more and more important as pollinators. But they are finding it increasingly difficult to find suitable places in which to rear their young, owing to modern building materials. While there may be plenty of food, there is nowhere for them to nest ... that is, until Bee Hotels are erected. Bee Hotels should be placed on a south or east-facing wall, which receives sun (never put one on a North facing wall - it will not be used). The soliary bees do not sting - but keep the Bee Hotel out of reach of children who may disturb them.

 

To construct a bee hotel, you will need a wooden post (480 x 75 x 75mm) and a wooden plank (760 x 125 x 20mm). Cut the post into four equal sections and the plank in to four equal sections too (but cut at an angle so they can be fitted together to make a box-like-frame). Drill entrance holes (9 per post) in the posts. They should have a diameter of 7 - 8mm and be drilled to about 100mm deep (do not go all the way through). The frame should then be fastened securely to the wall. The four posts will then slot snugly and not require any fixing. Voila!

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Educating Kids About Wildlife - Wildlife Gardener

Educating Kids About Wildlife - Wildlife Gardener | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
How introducing children to gardening helps to educate them about the environment and those that live within it.

 

Getting kids involved in wildlife gardening has many educational benefits. They’ll get to understand issues of key importance such as global warming and climate change which will have a major impact upon their future and will teach them other useful transferable skills which they can use in other areas throughout both their childhood and later in life.

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When Carnivores Come Calling - National Wildlife Federation

When Carnivores Come Calling - National Wildlife Federation | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Homeowners who live in areas where predators range can still have safe, wildlife-friendly yards...

 

How To Avoid Trouble
If you live in or near predator habitat, don’t intentionally feed these wild animals. You’re not only inviting trouble for yourself, you’re also potentially harming the predators by habituating them to humans and providing them with an unnatural diet. Consider the following common-sense steps:

• Don’t leave pet food—or human food—outside.

• Don’t let your pets roam outside unattended.

• Don’t leave any uncovered trash outside overnight.

• Don’t put meat and other strong-smelling food scraps in an outdoor compost pile.

• Do buy bear-proof garbage cans.

• Don’t put bird feeders outside when bears are active (mid-March through mid-November).

• Don’t plant berry-producing shrubs or fruit-bearing trees too close to your house.

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Plant this today for better health

Plant this today for better health | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"Tomatoes are rich in lycopene, an antioxidant responsible for their beautiful color. This makes for a beautiful fruit and a healthier you. Research has shown that lycopene may lower cardiovascular risk and the risk of some cancers. Plus, the carotenoids (including lycopene) help give skin an even, yellow tone. Tomatoes can even help protect you from sun damage. Who doesn’t want all that?

 

To reap all the health and beauty benefits, plant a tomato today.

 

You don’t need a garden, nor do you need to be a gardener. Take it from me, a tomato plant will grow in a pot, on a ledge, on your desk, and almost anywhere else you can find sun."

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Ten Herbs to Improve Your Cat's Health | petMD

Ten Herbs to Improve Your Cat's Health | petMD | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
If you’re lucky enough to have a garden, a balcony, or even just a sunny window sill, then you should look into growing an herb garden for your cat.

 

"Herbs grow easily, are delicious, and certain plants are not only adored by your kitty, but can also be very good for her health (not to mention yours), and useful for treating certain ailments she might have.

 

Even if you don’t have a green thumb, herbs tend to be easy to grow and are worth the minimal effort. And the bonus is, you can grow some for your own cooking pot, too."

 

(Courtesy of Mrs Kae Tattersall)

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Handbook of Nature Study: Spring Green Nature Journal Ideas

Handbook of Nature Study: Spring Green Nature Journal Ideas | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

The spring world just begs to be sketched in our nature journals. The colors of the flowers as they blossom in the warming sun just cry out to us to observe them closer, to see their intricate details. As I gather a few of our early spring flowers to record in my nature journal, I am struck the with the varying shades of green that appear in the leaves of these springtime beauties.

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Using Timed Plantings to Avoid Pests: Organic Gardening

Using Timed Plantings to Avoid Pests: Organic Gardening | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

You can prevent many pest problems by timing your plantings carefully. Here are 10 pernicious pests that can be foiled just by changing the planting time of their veggie targets.

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Bog Gardens for Damp-Loving Wildlife - Wildlife Gardener

Bog Gardens for Damp-Loving Wildlife - Wildlife Gardener | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
How to construct a bog garden. What it needs to be able to thrive and why it’s often a suitable alternative to having a garden pond.

 

A bog garden can be an ideal alternative to a garden pond especially if you have young children and are worried about the dangers of a pond. Bog gardens attract all manner of wildlife and also provide the right kind of environment for certain plants that would not thrive so well in deeper water. For keen gardeners, they are not that difficult to construct and, as they are shallower than a pond, it takes a lot less effort and time to design a bog garden than it would with a garden pond.

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5 Green Tips for Spring Cleaning | Caelus Green Room

5 Green Tips for Spring Cleaning | Caelus Green Room | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
5 Green Tips for Spring Cleaning...

 

1 Find and replace the toxic products in your home.

2 Buy nontoxic household cleaners.

3 Make your own household cleaning supplies.

4 Use all-natural drain cleaners.

5 Don’t use disposable cleaning products.

 

Under almost everyones kitchen sink is a collection of toxic chemicals in the form of bug killer, disinfectants, furniture polishes, and many others. When you are using these products, you are bathing your home in poisons, which eventually could have a negative impact on your family’s health. In addition, household poisonings are one of the highest threats to the health of children.

 

An excellent first step in greening your house is to grab a note pad and a garbage bag. Go around to all the cabinets that store household chemicals and take a look at their labels. If it says poison, danger, warning or caution on the can or box, write down what function it performs and throw the unused portion in the garbage bag (if it is sealed tightly). When finished, seal the bag, put it in a well ventilated area (such as outside or in a garage) and look up when the next Household Hazardous Pickup Day is in your neighborhood.

 

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Gardens Inspired: Predators in the garden - Beneficial insects

Gardens Inspired: Predators in the garden - Beneficial insects | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Beneficial Insects. To discover their value to your gardens and ways to attract each of the predators shown below, please click on the text next to its picture.


Via RuthHoward
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From Norfolk to the Congo … but will Martin the cuckoo ever make it home?

From Norfolk to the Congo … but will Martin the cuckoo ever make it home? | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Britain's cuckoo population is in sharp decline, so ornithologists have tracked five migrating birds to try to find out why...

 

He has flown thousands of miles across Africa and Europe and enjoyed a winter break in the Congo rainforest. But now Martin the cuckoo is missing and scientists are waiting, with mounting concern, for news of the errant bird.

 

Martin is one of a group of five cuckoos – the first to be fitted with satellite tags – which have revealed extraordinary details about the birds' migration routes. These journeys have taken them, over the past 12 months, from Norfolk to France, Spain and Italy and then, by a variety of routes that have included crossings of the Sahara and voyages through west Africa, to the equatorial forests of Congo, where the birds spent the winter. The variety and length of these journeys have astonished ornithologists who had little idea about the complexity and range of cuckoo migration until then.

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This weekend... spot a swallow... or something else? - Notes on nature - Wildlife - The RSPB Community

This weekend... spot a swallow... or something else? - Notes on nature - Wildlife - The RSPB Community | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"... swallows are arriving. They might be a bit slow to return because of bad weather here and in Europe, but be patient - they're on their way. If you get a good look at a swallow and see its unmistakeable forked tail, it's easy to identify. But beware - there are other, similar, birds out there to confuse you. ... Have you seen any other newly-arrived migrants yet?"

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Rare UK butterflies 'bounce back'

Rare UK butterflies 'bounce back' | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Warm, dry weather leads to a significant rise in the numbers of rare butterflies in the UK, a study suggests.

 

Record-breaking temperatures and dry weather in spring has led to an increase in the numbers of many species of rare butterfly, a study suggests. The UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology and charity Butterfly Conservation said the weather had provided "perfect conditions" for "spring specialists". Their study was based on assessments of over 1,000 UK butterfly habitat sites.

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Dew-soaked bugs: Ondrej Pakan's photos of insects covered in drops of water - Telegraph

Dew-soaked bugs: Ondrej Pakan's photos of insects covered in drops of water - Telegraph | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Dew-soaked bugs: Ondrej Pakan's photos of insects covered in tiny drops of water.

 

Ondrej Pakan, from Myjava, Slovakia, captures stunning macro photos of bugs covered in tiny water droplets. The photographer, who specialises in capturing insects seconds after a downpour, said: "I get soaked waiting for the rain to finish, but it all seems worth it when you get really great shots of the insects with drops on them." His shots include a blue damselfly covered in water droplets staring at the camera...

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The Benefits of Perennial Vegetables | Occupy Monsanto

The Benefits of Perennial Vegetables | Occupy Monsanto | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Perennial vegetable gardens build soil the way nature intended—by allowing the plants to add more and more organic matter without tillage, and letting the worms do the work of mixing it all together. Perennials provide ecosystem benefits.

 

"An annual vegetable garden, as we all know, requires much more watering, weeding, and work to get a good crop. Once established, perennial vegetables are often more resistant to the attacks of pests, due to their reserves of energy stored in their roots. ...

 

Their deep roots and soil building abilities make them more self-sufficient in terms of watering, and their canopies which leaf out so much earlier than annuals better suppress the growth of weeds. What else can these remarkable plants do?"


Via Bronwen Evans
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Five Easy to Grow Mosquito Repelling Plants | Wake Up World

Five Easy to Grow Mosquito Repelling Plants | Wake Up World | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Many homeowners and outdoor enthusiasts are looking for ways to control mosquitoes. Here are 5 plants that will to help control them naturally.

 

"... many commercial insect repellents contain from 5% to 25% DEET. There are concerns about the potential toxic effects of DEET, especially when used by children. Children who absorb high amounts of DEET through insect repellents have developed seizures, slurred speech, hypotension and bradycardia.

 

There are new DEET-free mosquito repellents on the market today which offer some relief to those venturing outdoors in mosquito season. But there are also certain plants which are easy to grow and will have some effect in repelling mosquitoes from areas of your home and garden.

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Black honeybees rediscovered in Britain

Black honeybees rediscovered in Britain | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

The native black honeybee, feared to have died out in all but the remote reaches of northern Britain, has been found in north Wales, east Anglia and as far south as West Sussex.

 

The Bee Improvement and Bee Breeders' Association (Bibba) claims the black honeybee could hold the key to reversing the dramatic decline in honeybee colonies in Britain because it is more adapted to the UK climate than the southern European honeybee subspecies used by many UK beekeepers.

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How to Make Your Garden Soil More Fertile in Simple Natural Ways

How to Make Your Garden Soil More Fertile in Simple Natural Ways | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

When we start gardening the most important factor that we need to keep in mind is the ‘SOIL’. Since a healthy soil is capable of storing as well as processing huge proportion of water, a gardener has to take special care of the soil quality in a regular manner. Otherwise all the plants will dry up and die subsequently. The solution to get healthy and high-quality soil is not much complicated. One can use all the kitchen scraps as well as garden wastes or animal dung in order to improve the garden soil organically. This way one can notice a dramatic improvement in its ability to preserve and regulate water.

 

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England faces wildlife tragedy as worst drought in 30 years hits habitats

England faces wildlife tragedy as worst drought in 30 years hits habitats | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Wildlife trusts urge action to avoid loss of rare species and protect tadpole, wading bird and water vole populations...

 

Helen Perkins, of The Wildlife Trusts, said: "A wildlife tragedy is unfolding in parts of the country. After such a long period of low rainfall, some species may not recover and could be lost from some rivers and wetlands if we don't act now."

 

Some areas of the country have suffered their driest 18 months since records began, and almost all of the east and south-east of England is now officially in a state of drought.

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Where to see bluebells in 2012 - Telegraph

Where to see bluebells in 2012  - Telegraph | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Francine Raymond's guide to where to find bluebells in the UK and how to recognise and protect our native perennial.

 

Used as an indicator of ancient woodland, and once common growing wild throughout Britain and Europe in hedgerows, scrubland and in woods, the bluebell has greatly declined in the past 50 years, with loss of habitat as the main culprit. Rogue bulb and seed collectors have taken their toll, and the arrival from the flower garden of the larger, fleshier, flashier Spanish bluebell has taken over scarce habitat. Recognise your enemy from our hit list below and discourage this scentless pale blue invader that has muscled its way in from the Continent, prevent hybridisation and protect our small native perennial whose unforgettable dark blue fragrant flowers cannot compete in the wild.

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British Butterflies in the Garden

British Butterflies in the Garden | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Pictures and information on British garden butterflies, and information on how to attract them and their caterpillars...

 

Owing to the decrease in the natural habitats, gardens are becoming more important to the survival of British butterflies. We as gardeners can help them flourish by providing plants that are attractive to butterflies.

The species of butterfly which may visit your garden will vary depending on where you live in the country, soil type and what else is around the area e.g. heathland, woodland or meadows.

Research has shown that most British butterflies favour blue, yellow and white flowers, though scent and size of flower also determine which species feed on which plants. The Small Tortoiseshell is probably our most frequent garden diner, and will visit almost all flowers its 14mm proboscis can reach.

Not all butterflies feed on flowers. Some, such as the Red Admiral, are also attracted to tree sap and rotting plums, and others to honey dew.

Most of us are familiar with the way that buddleia's attract a variety of butterflies, so much so that it is often known as the 'butterfly bush'. Other common garden plants, such as Sedum's and Lobelia attract Small Tortoiseshells and Whites respectively.

The most likely butterflies to visit you garden are listed with the plants they enjoy.
A list of caterpillar food plants can also be found.

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