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100 Acre Wood
Our natural habitat
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Gardening for children: Sunflower alley - Telegraph

Gardening for children: Sunflower alley - Telegraph | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Gigantic sunflowers are great to look at, but even better to walk through. Plant them on either side of a pathway and make a flower alley to impress friends and family.

You will need
20 small plastic pots
Potting mix
Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds
Watering can with a fine rose
Bricks or small stone slabs
Small trowel
Bamboo canes
Garden twine or string

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Organic Gardening Suggestions For Maximize Your Garden’s Potential

Organic Gardening Suggestions For Maximize Your Garden’s Potential | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

This set of ideas contains several of the greatest assistance for helping a good natural gardener grow to be an excellent organic gardener.

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Kids and Nature (Part I) : Why Children Need REAL Nature Experiences - Away from TV

Kids and Nature (Part I) : Why Children Need REAL Nature Experiences - Away from TV | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

I share my thoughts on why it’s important for our children (and us) to have REAL nature experiences – away from merely the vicarious pleasure of watching nature on television.

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Keep Your Garden Pest Free with These Natural Pesticides, Made with Ingredients Already in Your Pantry

Keep Your Garden Pest Free with These Natural Pesticides, Made with Ingredients Already in Your Pantry | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"If you're getting started with your backyard or container garden and want to be ready for when the inevitable unwanted guests move in, you don't have to run out and grab a couple of bottles of commercial pesticide from your local hardware store — there are safer, more natural options that won't leave your fledgling produce covered in chemicals. Best of all, you probably have the ingredients for them in your pantry already."

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Why Trees Matter

Why Trees Matter | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"Trees are nature’s water filters, capable of cleaning up the most toxic wastes, including explosives, solvents and organic wastes, largely through a dense community of microbes around the tree’s roots that clean water in exchange for nutrients, a process known as phytoremediation. Tree leaves also filter air pollution. A 2008 study by researchers at Columbia University found that more trees in urban neighborhoods correlate with a lower incidence of asthma.

 

In Japan, researchers have long studied what they call “forest bathing.” A walk in the woods, they say, reduces the level of stress chemicals in the body and increases natural killer cells in the immune system, which fight tumors and viruses. Studies in inner cities show that anxiety, depression and even crime are lower in a landscaped environment."

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Coffee grounds – the most useful waste food?

Coffee grounds – the most useful waste food? | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"Next time you brew up some ‘proper’ coffee, don’t discard the grounds. The waste product is arguably more useful than the drink itself! Used coffee grounds can replace bought products in our beauty routines, around the house and in the garden, saving us a packet – plus they get an A-grade for environmental friendliness.
Here are 12 reasons why we think coffee grounds are worth keeping. Can you think of more?"

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Handbook of Nature Study: Buds and Catkins - Our Spring Nature Study

Handbook of Nature Study: Buds and Catkins - Our Spring Nature Study | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

The Handbook of Nature Study blog is the home of the weekly Outdoor Hour Challenge which encourages families to enjoy the nature in their own backyards through simple activities and nature journals.

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Clover making a comeback

"Proponents of organic lawn care are pushing to bring clover back to wide use as a lawn plant, mixed with more conventional turf grasses. They point to clover’s benefits, which include its ability to withstand drought, thrive in poor soil and supply nitrogen to other plants. ... In fact, clover is nature’s way of healing soil that’s nitrogen-deficient, Myers said. That’s why it tends to move into areas with poor soil, often to the homeowner’s chagrin. That nitrogen-fixing ability can go a long way toward eliminating the need to fertilize ..."

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The State of Britain's Butterflies - Butterfly Conservation

The State of Britain's Butterflies - Butterfly Conservation | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

The latest report, "The State of the UK's Butterflies 2011", was published by Butterfly Conservation in collaboration with the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, and summarises the findings of over 10 years of intensive survey, monitoring and conservation effort. The report is based on millions of butterfly records collected by over ten thousand volunteers through the Butterflies for the New Millennium recording scheme and UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme.

 

The report highlights the continuing decline of the UK's butterflies, measured by the changes in their distribution and population levels over a 10-year period and the implications for conservation.

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42 Flowers You Can Eat

42 Flowers You Can Eat | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"The culinary use of flowers dates back thousands of years to the Chinese, Greek and Romans. Many cultures use flowers in their traditional cooking — think of squash blossoms in Italian food and rose petals in Indian food. Adding flowers to your food can be a nice way to add color, flavor and a little whimsy. Some are spicy, and some herbacious, while others are floral and fragrant. The range is surprising."

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Urban Gardening & Window Farming

Urban Gardening & Window Farming | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Why do we not produce locally grown food in our cities? We do not all need too become guerrilla gardeners: Just pick up few plastic pots, some soil and seeds!

Via Alan Yoshioka
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Growing info cards. Growing Cards - Grow Your Own info in bite-sized chunks

Growing info cards. Growing Cards - Grow Your Own info in bite-sized chunks | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Growing Cards - Grow Your Own info in bite-sized chunks

Downloadable Food Growing Instruction Cards - all the information you need to start you growing your own veg, fruit, herbs, edible flowers and green manures.
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Worm composting / Royal Horticultural Society

Worm composting / Royal Horticultural Society | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Worm composting is an efficient method of turning kitchen waste and small amounts of garden waste into nutrient-rich compost and a concentrated liquid fertiliser. ... A ‘worm bin’ or ‘wormery’ usually consists of at least two compartments; a lower collection sump for the liquid and an upper composting area where the kitchen waste goes in and the worms actively work. However, single compartment wormeries can be also used.

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8 Weeds You Can Eat: Organic Gardening

8 Weeds You Can Eat: Organic Gardening | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"Here are some suggestions for finding free munchies in your backyard. Just remember to ID them with a credible source if you’re not plant-savvy—there's even an app for that! If you've got a smart phone, download the Wild Edibles app created by Steve Brill, a botanist known for giving edible-plant tours of New York City's Central Park. Also, wash your harvest thoroughly before consuming, and steer clear of areas that may have been treated with chemicals or pesticides."

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Master Gardeners: The dirt on soil problems

Master Gardeners: The dirt on soil problems | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"DIFFERENT PLANTS PREFER different soils. So understanding what soil is best for a group of plants in a given area can help in determining how to make adjustments.

 

Three concepts that all gardeners should know about soil is succession, texture and structure. Understanding a bit about each, as well as the effects of salt and aeration, can get to the root of why some plants grow while others whither."

 

This is a bit tech-y but has some very useful information.

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5 Green Tips for avoiding Insecticides | Caelus Green Room

5 Green Tips for avoiding Insecticides | Caelus Green Room | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"78 million households in the U.S. use home and garden pesticides. Suburban lawns and gardens receive more pesticide applications per acre (3.2-9.8 lbs) than agriculture (2.7 lbs per acre on average).

 

Insecticides are poisons designed to kill insects. Insecticides include active ingredients (chemical compounds designed to kill the target organisms) and inert ingredients which may be carcinogens or toxic substances. They also include rodenticides and wood preservatives.

 

By following the tips below, you can reduce the effect of insecticides on your health and the environment."

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Birds & Blooms Magazine - Uses for Milk Jugs

Birds & Blooms Magazine - Uses for Milk Jugs | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

You know those old items you have lying around, purposeless? Here are six things you can do with an old milk jug!

 

1 Cut them into strips to make plant markers.
2 Use them as collars to keep cutworms from destroying young plants.
3 Make a simple watering can. Just cut a small hole in one bottom corner and set it next to a plant. The water slowly seeps out.
4 Cut a hole in the side and make it into a bird feeder.
5 Slide it over your bird feeder pole as a squirrel baffle.
6 Cut off the bottom and one side up to the handle for a scoop for birdseed or potting soil.

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Encouraging Wildlife in Your Hedges - Wildlife Gardener

Encouraging Wildlife in Your Hedges - Wildlife Gardener | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
How even a small hedge of the right make up can encourage wildlife to set up in your garden. How it provides food, shelter and a place to avoid predators for insects, birds and small mammals.
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How To Encourage Wildlife into Your Garden | Gardeners Tips

How To Encourage Wildlife into Your Garden | Gardeners Tips | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Some useful tips to encourage birds, insects, frogs and small mammals into your garden.

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What is a SeedBomb? - Green Living - The Ecologist

What is a SeedBomb? - Green Living - The Ecologist | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
In an exclusive extract from her new book, Seedbombs: Going Wild with Flowers, author and gardener, Josie Jeffery, explains the seedbomb phenomenon...

 

"When I tell people I make seedbombs, they look puzzled and ask, ‘What is a seedbomb?’. They think they are edible (some fancy new superfood) or a cosmetic product. Rarely do people think they are horticultural. I smile and begin a well-rehearsed explanation. Firstly, they are NOT EXPLOSIVE OR EDIBLE! A seedbomb is a little ball made up of a combination of compost, clay and seeds."

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Good Tips for Saving Water in the Garden | Gardeners Tips

Good Tips for Saving Water in the Garden | Gardeners Tips | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"Recent years, have seen an increase in the number of hot dry spells ... Conserving water has therefore become increasingly important. Conserving water does not just save money (for those on water meters), but also helps the environment and helps maintain a healthy garden."

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Native plants are better than non-native for pollinators

Native plants are better than non-native for pollinators | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Flat, open flowers may be accessible to just about any kind of visitor, but those with more complex shapes have co-evolved with their pollinators, and don’t welcome others. This is the case of kudzu, that formidable Asiatic invader. In North America, it propagates mostly through runners and rhizomes because native pollinators can’t handle its flowers, so seeds are seldom produced. In recent years, a large black bee from Asia, the giant resin bee (Megachile sculpturalis), arrived in North America by accident and started spreading across the landscape. Guess what: This bee is a very efficient pollinator of kudzu’s flowers. So, now this invasive can also propagate by seed. Oh, joy!

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Buglife | Conservation | Why we need to conserve invertebrates

Buglife | Conservation | Why we need to conserve invertebrates | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

‘If we and the rest of the back-boned animals were to disappear overnight, the rest of the world would get on pretty well. But if the invertebrates were to disappear, the world’s ecosystems would collapse.’ Sir David Attenborough

At least 65% of all species on the planet are invertebrates. There are more than 32,000 terrestrial and freshwater and 7,000 marine species in the UK alone, and many are critically endangered. ... Mankind has a responsibility to work within the environmental limits of the planet – otherwise we may be condemning many species including ourselves to extinction.

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Bats in the Garden

Bats in the Garden | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Despite their sometimes "scary" image, in reality bats are a friend not only to gardeners but, people in general. A single pipistrelle bat can eat up to 3000 insects per night. Many of these insects will be nuisances like mosquitoes and gnats, and of course many will be feeding on your plants. Bats fly and feed by night, so a plentiful supply of night flying insects is essential. Many herbs and flowers attract insects, and those that give off scent by night are particularly important to bats because it is these that will attract the insects. Amongst the common ones recommended plants are honeysuckle, evening primrose, night scented stock, lemon balm, mint, borage, nicotiana, sweet rocket (every garden should have some anyway), white jasmine and dogrose. 

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