100 Acre Wood
3.6K views | +0 today
Follow
100 Acre Wood
Our natural habitat
Curated by David Rowing
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Creating Garden Pathways

Creating Garden Pathways | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

" ... If I could use any material I wanted for the pathways, I would use old, reclaimed paving bricks. I’d have tiny little plants growing between them and beautiful green moss growing on them.

 

In the real world though, we’ve found something that is within our budget and looks pretty good. We use wood chips spread pretty deeply (4-6″). They began to break down a bit and we’ve had to add more, here and there. The older they get, the better they look. They do a pretty good job of holding down the weeds and they are not bad to walk on."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Wild, unkempt nature - in a garden - IOL Lifestyle

Wild, unkempt nature - in a garden - IOL Lifestyle | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Jenny Louw’s tips:-

 

l The key principle is biodiversity. Create biodiversity everywhere

2 Compost is your base food.

3 Soil needs probiotics – healthy micro-organisms (such as fungi and bacteria). There are products available (www.naturalgardening principles.co.za).

4 Get the minerals your soil needs from seawater – water beds with a 10 percent dilution quarterly.

5 Seek out top quality compost and mulch. It must be diverse in what it’s made from and organic. (Reliance is good).

6 If you have a small space, use pots – you can easily grow lettuce and other leaf crops and herbs using the tips above.

7 Create habitats – put logs on the ground for creatures to live in. Use stones.

8 Avoid chemicals – they disrupt the biodiverse system and add toxins to the soil.

9 Allow the food chain to develop, give competition to plants, such as weeds or predators.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Pest and Fungus Control Practices in an Organic Garden

Pest and Fungus Control Practices in an Organic Garden | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

" ... sometimes our springs are a little soggy like this one has been and we didn’t have even one hard freeze this year so fungus and insects are at a high point and feasting on my roses especially. Then I do use a fungal spray which also deters feeding insects.

 

Here is the recipe:

4 tsp. Baking Soda
1 Tbsp. Horticultural Oil (I use a light year-round oil)
1 Gallon of Water


Mix and apply to the leaves with a pump sprayer (pictured below) or a regular spray bottle. I use both. That’s it."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

10 Sustainable Ways to Reuse Wine Corks | Renewsing

10 Sustainable Ways to Reuse Wine Corks | Renewsing | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Everyone has corks left over after a bottle of wine and you never quite know what to do with them. Well consider that problem solved with this list of 10 sustainable ways to reuse your wine corks and give them a new life. These are also simple DIY projects that craft lovers will enjoy.

more...
David Rowing's comment, May 1, 2012 1:20 AM
Thanks! I hope someone finds this useful ... and fun.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Family disputes create rebel bees

Family disputes create rebel bees | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Worker bees rebel when faced with the prospect of raising their nephews and nieces, research finds.

 

Scientists in Poland have studied post-swarm bee colonies to understand how workers react to a change in queen. They discovered that when a daughter replaces her mother as head of the colony, some worker bees reproduce instead of caring for their monarch's offspring.

 

The findings are published in the journal Current Biology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

The Bees are Here! Starting beekeeping

The Bees are Here! Starting beekeeping | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"You may wonder, if you are starting a hive, how do you get the bees? They come in little wooden crate. The package contains a queen, some food, and three pounds of bees, that’s about 10,000 bees. ...

 

It has been fascinating to watch the hive come alive over the weekend. There is was a busy hum all day, then, at dusk, all the bees went inside and it beomes very quiet. I found myself spending time just sitting on the lawn and gazing, mesmerized, at the hive. It’s soothing rather than nerve-wracking. I’m also amazed how I was immediately comfortable with bees crawling on me. I even coaxed a few (like the ones that ended up inside the veil when I left it on the table) onto my finger to relocate them closer to the hive."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Planting herbs, vegetables, and flowers in poor soil - by Susan Klatz Beal - Helium

Planting herbs, vegetables, and flowers in poor soil - by Susan Klatz Beal - Helium | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Most gardeners are not fortunate enough to have perfect or ideal soil when they go to plant flowers, herbs or vegetables.

 

"... One can always get creative when attempting to deal with less than optimal planting conditions. One of the easiest and most full proof ways to remedy a situation in which the soil is horrible is to create a lasagna bed.

 

A lasagna bed is made by building up layers of newspaper, kitchen scraps (not yet composted,) yard scraps such as leaves, grass clippings or twigs and anything else that will decompose fairly quickly. Cardboard also works. Some people find that using cardboard on the bottom helps promote decomposition faster than if it were placed closer to the top of the pile. ..."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Organic Gardening | Facebook

Organic Gardening | Facebook | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Dandelion health benefits + composting spent dandelion tea Blossoms, Leaves, and/or Roots, after drinking your dandelion tea, improves soil composition.

 

(There are very few side effects linked to using dandelion root. Allergic Reactions to the herb have been reported. People taking prescription lithium, a diuretic, medication to lower blood pressure or medication to lower blood sugar should not take dandelion root. Women who are Pregnant or Breastfeeding should consult their doctor before taking this herb.)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Rowing from Upcycled Garden Style
Scoop.it!

A clever edible wall

A clever edible wall | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Yesterday, I went to the LA Garden Show at the Los Angeles Arboretum. It was fabulous! The theme was: EDIBLE PLANTS! WooHoo! Yes, I was in heaven wondering acres of edible landscapes that could be grown in backyards, pots, and balconies. They featured organics and sustainable gardening practices and lots of cool garden designs.

 

Here is just one of the clever garden features – An edible wall by Go Green Gardeners.

It is made out of an old winery rack (where they would stick the wine bottles to age). It is wood and already has holes waiting to be filled with plants.


Via Debra Anchors
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

10 Uses For A Garden Hose

10 Uses For A Garden Hose | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Assign an old hose to new tasks...

 

A bunch of great uses for an old garden hose in your house and in the garden. Before you throw your old one out and pick up a new one, give the list a look.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Debra Anchors
Scoop.it!

Gardens Inspired: Attract bug-eating birds to your garden

Gardens Inspired: Attract bug-eating birds to your garden | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"In lieu of using pesticides to rid your plants of damaging insects, why not employ one of nature’s insecticides in your garden – birds? A healthy population of birds can be the best friend a gardener or farmer can have.

 

How effective are birds in ridding your garden of unwanted pests? Consider an 1885 United States Bureau of Biological Survey study of the eating habits of wild birds. In the extensive study, the stomach contents of over sixty thousand birds of over 400 species were examined and analyzed. The results are fascinating."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

David Robson: Turn Mother Nature against her pests

David Robson: Turn Mother Nature against her pests | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
The right birds and insects can save your garden.

 

"You cannot control 100 percent of pests. That’s a pipe dream. The idea is to manage pests to reduce their impact. The best way is to let nature manage her delinquents. And one of the best ways is to encourage birds and other insects into the garden to feed on unwelcome bugs. Birds don’t do much for controlling diseases and weeds.

 

Birdhouses and feeding the birds during the winter is one way to advertise you have something worth sticking around for. The more birds and the bigger variety of winged creatures you have, the fewer insect problems you’ll notice."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

The latest buzz on bees

The latest buzz on bees | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

“I am still fascinated by the way over 30,000 individual insects act in unity of purpose, as though they were individual cells in a larger body. Each colony has it’s own ‘personality’ reflecting the genetics of the single queen.

“Some are calm and quiet — easily worked with — others act nervous and flighty while others are quite aggressive. The personality traits of the colony can be changed in as little as a few weeks, simply by replacing the queen.”

The problem for humans is that nothing can replace the bee. When as much as a third of the food we eat depends at least partially on honeybee pollination, the threat of their extinction is enough to worry any modern civilization. Bailey, however, is not as worried.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Do You Live In A Green Environment Or Is Your Environment Transparent? » Green Home | Green Home

Do You Live In A Green Environment Or Is Your Environment Transparent? » Green Home | Green Home | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"People today are becoming more concern about the environment and go green environmental services than the last century. Over the century, our environment has gone from green to transparent. Transparent meaning chemical use more and more taking the natural product and turning it to transparent with so many chemicals a person reading the label would hardly find the natural product.


Today and for years we eat, sleep, breath, walk, drive, work, play, wear, and see with chemicals. As we know, most foods today made with chemicals or made up with chemicals to make the fastest way to prepare food. The cooking equipment we use, to the coffee pot for morning coffee is chemical made. We sleep on chemical pillows, sheets, blankets, comforters and yes, the pajamas are full of chemicals."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Helping Birds | Audubon At Home

Helping Birds | Audubon At Home | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

No matter where you live, there are birds that need your help. Select a few species to help, depending on what kind of landscape you live in and the features of your land and surrounding properties, and get specific recommendations and downloadable instructions here.

 

Birds of every kind – songbirds, raptors, and shorebirds – fly from their winter homes in the south to their summer breeding grounds in places as far north as the Arctic in the spring and back south in the fall. Along the way they encounter many perils including bright lights and tall buildings, cats and toxic lawns.

 

Fortunately, people can help ensure a safer journey for migrating birds. Backyards and parks, often key stopover points for many species, can become bird-friendly rest stops with a few simple steps that you can find here.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Healthy Yards | Audubon At Home

Healthy Yards | Audubon At Home | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

You’re ready to begin creating an outdoor space that’s healthy for wildlife, for you and your family, and for the environment. Whether you’re just starting out or already on your way there, Audubon can help you reach your goal. Learn more.

 

Use these downloadable worksheets to take stock and then take steps towards your healthy home and habitat!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Butterfly gardening a popular gardening pastime

Butterfly gardening a popular gardening pastime | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Butterfly gardening has become one of the most popular gardening pastimes today. And it’s no wonder. After all, what could be more enjoyable than sitting peacefully in the middle of a butterfly garden on a sunny day?

 

According to Suzanne Cook, head gardener for Pekin Park District since 2004, starting a butterfly garden at home is as easy as picking a spot and planting some butterfly-attracting plants.

 

“A butterfly garden is not hard to maintain,” Cook insists. “It could be a formal garden or a wildflower garden. Butterflies like a variety of plants. They like herbs, especially mint — but mint is an invasive plant. Some of the best plants for home gardens are zinnia, butterfly bush, Victoria blue solisia, and tropical milkweed. But there are many others.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Community Magazine: GROWING YOUR GARDEN

Community Magazine: GROWING YOUR GARDEN | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"The part of home growing that deters most urban-dwellers is a simple lack of gardening space. Many of us don’t have a yard, and even the ones who do, don’t want to see it overrun with vines and messy plants. It’s a rational excuse, but don’t let it stop you if you really want to grow something.

 

Container gardening is an excellent alternative, and gives you the option of taking your plants if you go away in the beginning of the summer, while they are still small. And you can transplant them into the ground if your summer home has space. ...

 

There’s no need to spend lots of money on planters– you can fill a large container or bucket. If it doesn’t have drainage holes, drill or hammer them yourself. The main criteria for selecting a location for your plants is sunlight; most plants need six hours of sunlight daily, and access to water. But be creative, and don’t overlook potential sites – rooftop, deck, balcony, or porch. Even six inches of dirt along a backyard fence (or a rocky, sandy patch) can produce surprising yields, if you choose the right crops."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Growing Herbs Outdoors – Tips for Better Crops | Gardeners Tips

Growing Herbs Outdoors – Tips for Better Crops | Gardeners Tips | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Some herbs can be difficult to grow in the open garden but it is worth persisting. Here are some simple tips to help get bigger and better crops together with some perennial herb plants to start you off.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

How to Start a Medicinal Herb Garden

How to Start a Medicinal Herb Garden | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

"In days gone by gardens full of vegetables, herbs, and flowers were common place and existed as part of the landscape of the home. Many of these gardens were designed to include a section dedicated to medicinal herbs and healing plants of all kinds.


Tending the garden meant producing one’s own food and medicine — it meant learning the rhythms of the seasons. It was a link between humanity and nature. Digging up a small area in the yard – or filling a few pots on the patio – and planting medicinal herbs can be revolutionary in helping us to remain connected."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Study finds that mild winters are detrimental to butterflies

Study finds that mild winters are detrimental to butterflies | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
The recent mild winter throughout much of the United States was a cause for celebration for many. However, butterfly aficionados shouldn't be joining in the celebration.

 

"The energy reserves the caterpillars collect in the summer need to provide enough energy for both overwintering and metamorphosing into a butterfly in the spring," Caroline William, lead author of the study, said.


So a butterfly needs to conserve as much energy as it can during the winter months. In the paper, Hellmann and her colleagues explain for the first time how warmer winters can lead to a decrease in the number of butterflies.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

How does your garden grow? Upwards

How does your garden grow? Upwards | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Gardening in a small space can be challenging, but some of the nicest gardens I have seen have been small and incredibly well thought out.

 

"Vines as a group of plants tend to be underused in most gardens, and that is unfortunate. They provide multiple solutions to design problems. Requiring no more than some support to wrap themselves around or rest on, most vines direct their energy into growing upwards whenever possible. They can be used effectively in creating visual screens when trained on a well-placed trellis or can be the perfect solution for covering up an unsightly feature like an old fence."

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

In the Garden, Divide and Multiply

In the Garden, Divide and Multiply | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
A simple technique called division lets gardeners fill up a flower bed without having to put out money.

 

In my yard I have a plant called Stoke's aster, which puts out spiky, purple-blue flowers along the edge of my front walk each July. I started out with just one of them. Now I have seven. And I didn't spend a cent beyond buying plant No. 1.

 

How did I do it? Through a simple technique called division. Basically, you chop off a piece of a perennial plant—or pull apart a chunk of its roots by hand, depending on the variety—put it in the ground and let it grow into a new one. In a year or two, the babies should grow almost to the size of the parent.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Use climbing foliage and flora to blur garden planes, hide unsightly features and soften imposing landscape boundaries

Use climbing foliage and flora to blur garden planes, hide unsightly features and soften imposing landscape boundaries | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Our 21st-century lifestyle has left many of us with smaller gardens, where every inch of outdoor space is precious. Through the use of climbers and wall shrubs, we can expand our planting opportunity, giving us a wealth of form, color and texture right through the gardening year.

 

Besides being decorative, climbers have a multitude of uses in the small garden. They soften hard edges, camouflage unsightly structures and even distract the eye from unwanted features outside the garden.

Below are some ways to use climbers for both decorative and utilitarian purposes in the garden.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Plant a Tree for Arbor Day! - Project: Greenify | Guide to Going Green in Your Home, Office & Life

Plant a Tree for Arbor Day! - Project: Greenify | Guide to Going Green in Your Home, Office & Life | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
It's Arbor Day, the day where we reflect on how important our trees are, and what we can do to ensure the generations after us will have the same memories of spending a lazy summer afternoon under a big oak tree.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.