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100 Acre Wood
Our natural habitat
Curated by David Rowing
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Kids have a blast discovering plants and climate with Green Up

Kids have a blast discovering plants and climate with Green Up | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Isygames a burgeoning mobile application and software solutions developer, has announced the launch of Green Up onto the App Store. Compatible with the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, Green Up is a wild new educational app created specifically to help young children learn how to grow plants, gives main gardening concepts, and learn the basics of ecology and biodiversity.

 

The app makes learning a vibrantly colorful and highly intuitive experience, and even comes complete with the detailed description of seeds and plants parts. Guaranteeing that kids have an avenue to adopt plant’s knowledge into their daily repertoire.

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Fresh Winter Herbs and Preserving Herbs

Fresh Winter Herbs and Preserving Herbs | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Herbs for winter flavour in your food can be kept fresh or preserved direct from your garden. Most herbs can be dries and Mint can even be pickled so have a go at herb preservation.

 

Many herbs die down in open ground during winter. It is worthwhile digging up and potting up a clump of herbs for the cool greenhouse or kitchen windowsill. Chives, Parsley, Mint, Marjoram, Basil and Thyme are suitable subjects. Winter herbs need plenty of light, cool conditions, occasional ventilation and regular watering. Remove dead and dying leaves and flowers immediately. ...

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Plant Gardens 101 | Gardening And Your Kids

Plant Gardens 101 | Gardening And Your Kids | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Apparently, we can see how nature is treated these days. It is a sad thing to know that people do not pay attention so much anymore to the environmental problems. What can we do about this? It’s as simple as starting with the children. It is good to see the children’s involvement with environment-friendly activities. One such nature-loving activity that children could easily get their hands on is gardening. Why should you consider gardening for your children?

 

Here are the benefits that gardening could easily provide the children with:-

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Compost hot-tub - Little eco footprints

Compost hot-tub - Little eco footprints | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
There's currently no hot water or electricity at our little farm. I'm actually enjoying not having any power, especially when it's combined with no mobile reception. But I must admit hot water would be nice.

 

There's currently no hot water or electricity at our little farm. I'm actually enjoying not having any power, especially when it's combined with no mobile reception. But I must admit hot water would be nice. Last week I went three days without a shower - not something I want to repeat every week.

 

Today I stumbled across the perfect temporary solution - a compost hot tub!

 

The video shares how to create a hot-tub that is heated by compost.

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Waste land vital for UK wildlife

Waste land vital for UK wildlife | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Wasteland or "brownfield" areas are vital but overlooked habitats for UK wildlife, according to the charity Butterfly Conservation. These sites are home to unusual, hardy plants and their patches of bare ground become warm "microclimates".

Experts say these features allow many rare insects to thrive.

 

One moth, the small ranunculus, which disappeared from the UK before World War II, has now recolonised brownfield habitats throughout England and Wales.

 

While most moths fly during the night, there are about 500 species of day-flying moths in the UK. Early summer is the best time to spot them. Butterflies are actually a type of moth. The insects both belong to the Lepidoptera family.


Many moths thrive on brownfield sites, including the rare small ranunculus (pictured) and more common, (and colourfully named) bright wave, chalk carpet, wormwood and six-belted clearwing, which looks like a wasp

The conservation group and and the wildlife magazine the insect journal Atropos are encouraging people, where safe and legal access is possible, to explore their local quarries, disused railway lines, gravel pits and spoil tips in search of unusual moths this weekend.

 

This call for public participation is part of the charity's annual "moth night".

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What Good Are Mosquitoes?

What Good Are Mosquitoes? | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
You probably can't think of one good thing to say about mosquitoes. They're annoying, they bite, and they carry deadly diseases. But they must be good for something, right? What good are mosquitoes?

 

Mosquito larvae are aquatic insects, and as such, play an important role in the aquatic food chain. According to Dr. Gilbert Waldbauer in The Handy Bug Answer Book, "mosquito larvae are filter feeders that strain tiny organic particles such as unicellular algae from the water and convert them to the tissues of their own bodies, which are, in turn, eaten by fish." Mosquito larvae are, in essence, nutrient-packed snacks for fish and other aquatic animals.

 

Their role on the bottom of the food chain doesn't end at the larval stage, of course. As adults, mosquitoes serve as equally nutritious meals for birds, bats, and spiders.

 

As much as we loathe them, mosquitoes represent a considerable biomass of food for wildlife on the lower rungs of the food chain. Their extinction, were it even achievable, would have an enormous adverse affect on the entire ecosystem.

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National Insect Week 2012

National Insect Week 2012 | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

WELCOME TO NATIONAL INSECT WEEK!

 

The next National Insect Week will run in 2012, from 25 June to 1 July.

 

National Insect Week is designed to show your more about the insect world in all its fascinating diversity. Use this website to wow your friends and family with more amazing insect facts, find out about events near you and see the results of our popular photography competition. Also, don't miss the NIW Blog!

 

National Insect Week is organised by the Royal Entomological Society and is supported by a large number of partner organisations concerned with many aspects of insect science, natural history and biodiversity.

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Gardening for Biodiversity - Wanderer

Gardening for Biodiversity - Wanderer | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

A well-groomed garden with lawns and non- native plants is no magnet for butterflies, or other insects and birds that share our local ecosystem. If you want your garden to bustle with life, use native plants and a wide array of colorful nectar producing flowers.

 

... To create a garden attracting butterflies, a variety of plants should adorn a yard. Fragrant yellow, purpose, and white flowers will attract butterflies, which often rely on smell to locate nectar. Also many plants should be available for choosy female butterflies to lay their eggs. Trees also are important harboring grounds for these insects. “A lot of butterflies actually grow up in trees,” Hogan said. She also advised that a water source be available to nourish the insects and birds.

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'On the brink' species counted

'On the brink' species counted | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
East Asia's status as the world's main "extinction hotspot" is confirmed in the new Red List of Threatened Species.

 

Snakes such as the king cobra, the world's largest venomous serpent, are increasingly threatened by hunting for meat, skin and the pet trade.

 

The Red List was unveiled at the Rio+20 sustainable development meeting.

 

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature, which compiles the list, says it shows the importance of nature for human wellbeing.

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Cottage Country Now Article: IN THE GARDEN — Allium, not your average onion

Cottage Country Now Article: IN THE GARDEN — Allium, not your average onion | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
MUSKOKAN — There are certain plants I’ve always coveted. One of those is allium, a member of the onion family. Yes, onion, but not one that brings tears to your eyes... though it is spectacular.

 

I’ve noticed alliums in display gardens and magazines looking so exotic with their huge round heads of delicate flowers that I didn’t even consider the possibility of growing them in my own garden. I assumed they were fussy or fragile, but we all know what happens when we assume. It turns out that they’re not only hardy for this area, they’re super easy to grow.

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Plant These Herbs & Veggies to Attract Beneficial Insects to Your Urban Garden | Urban Organic Gardener

Plant These Herbs & Veggies to Attract Beneficial Insects to Your Urban Garden | Urban Organic Gardener | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

A Practical Solution to Attracting Beneficial Insects

 

Grow something that will serve two purposes. One for you to eat and one to attract the beneficial insects.

 

This isn’t a post of every single plant that will attract every single insect. Those aren’t useful.

 

It’s a post that will attract two beneficial insects that will help out most urban gardeners – ladybugs and lacewings.

 

Both of them will take care of aphids and other soft-bodied insects.

 

 

What You Can Plant to Attract Ladybugs & Lacewings

 

Here is a short list of herbs and veggies that you can eat and use to attract these good guys:

 

Coriander/Cilantro Dandelion Dill Fennel Lady bugs will also be attracted to Marigolds

 

There are billion other flowers that can be planted to attract these and other beneficial insects, but want to help you really maximize your small space.

 

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The next time you empty a bottle of wine . . .

The next time you empty a bottle of wine . . . | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Marbles and a pretty wine bottle can add form and function to your garden.

 

Read about how to make your own drip irrigation system, here:  http://goo.gl/KOi9i


Via Debra Anchors
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Big Creek RV Park's curator insight, January 29, 2013 11:49 AM

Wow! Great reuse idea!

Mary Barrett Simpson's comment, February 18, 2013 4:32 PM
Great idea!! Lets drink to that!!!
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Environment: The Vanishing Forests : CLIMATE HIMALAYA

Environment: The Vanishing Forests : CLIMATE HIMALAYA | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Forests keep the planet alive and play a key role in the battle against climate change. Forests feed rivers and are essential in replenishing the water table; they maintain soil fertility and minimise the often devastating impact of storms, floods and fires. They are the green lungs of the earth. But despite all of these priceless ecological, economic, social and health benefits, people are destroying the very forests they need to live and breathe.


Environmental degradation in Pakistan is a well-documented fact and this degradation is impacting the entire national social and economic landscape. It covers all natural resources e.g. forests, wetlands, land and air. Soil erosion, degradation of organic matter, water logging, salinity and loss of cover of natural vegetation are the visible damage.


Water basins are depleting, water pollution is on the rise and there are no checks and balances in place to control the pollution of water by industrial and household waste. Shakeel Ahmad Ramay of the Sustainable Development Policy Institute, painted a bleak picture regarding environment degradation in the country.

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Free Plants from Layering, Cuttings and Division

Free Plants from  Layering, Cuttings and Division | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

It can be very satisfying to grow more plants for free. There are several ways including layering and cuttings than can help you increase your stock of plants. Then you can give them away, plant them, resell or just use them to protect against losses of your favourites.

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Windowsill Gardening

Windowsill Gardening | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

If you have a windowsill you can do all sorts of gardening. If you like flowering plants, herbs or just greenery to clean the air a vast range of plants can be successfully grown on your windowsill.

 

 

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On the Trails: Carnivorous plants - Juneau Empire

On the Trails: Carnivorous plants - Juneau Empire | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Carnivorous plants have fascinated people for more than one hundred years, perhaps longer. We are so familiar with the idea that animals eat plants, that the notion of plants eating animals seems quite exceptional. Yet there are hundreds of species of animal-eating plants around the world.

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Researchers find some plants get their nitrogen from fungi that kill insects

Researchers find some plants get their nitrogen from fungi that kill insects | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) -- We've all grown up with stories of plants that capture, kill and eat insects; the Venus fly trap the most notable example. Now it appears some plants get their nitrogen from insects via proxy.

 

After noting that a prior team of researchers had found that white pine trees got some of their nitrogen from fungus living in their roots that had obtained the nitrogen by killing springtails, the team wondered if perhaps many other plants did the same. To find out, they chose two random but common plants, haricot beans and switchgrass.


First they fed waxmoth larve a diet rich in a non-common type of nitrogen; nitrogen-15, so as to be able to distinguish it from the nitrogen that would normally be found in the plants. Next they infected the soil near the roots of the plants with Metarhizium, a very common type of fungi that is known to kill insects by releasing an enzyme that eats its way through the outer shell allowing the bug inside to be easily devoured. Then, they buried the infected larvae in the soil among the plant roots, along with a mesh to prevent the roots of the plants from reaching past the infected soil to soil that had been enriched with nitrogen through normal bacterial decomposition.


Two weeks later they tested the plants and found that the nitrogen in the beans was 28% nitrogen-15, and 32% in the switchgrass, proving that the plants had obtained at least some of their nitrogen from the fungi that had in turn got it from killing the enriched larvae. The chain was complete.

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A special place to yourself

A special place to yourself | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

A perfect hide-away, created from 5 discarded doors.

 

by TinyWhiteDaisies: http://goo.gl/7bnvC


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Carcinogens linked to cancer stem cells, but spinach can help

Carcinogens linked to cancer stem cells, but spinach can help | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Researchers for the first time have traced the actions of a known carcinogen in cooked meat to its complex biological effects on microRNA and cancer stem cells. They also found that spinach can help prevent some of the damage done by this carcinogen.

 

Researchers at Oregon State University have for the first time traced the actions of a known carcinogen in cooked meat to its complex biological effects on microRNA and cancer stem cells.

The findings are part of a growing awareness of the role of epigenetics in cancer, or the ways in which gene expression and cell behavior can be changed even though DNA sequence information is unaltered.


The scientists also found that consumption of spinach can partially offset the damaging effects of the carcinogen. In tests with laboratory animals, it cut the incidence of colon tumors almost in half, from 58 percent to 32 percent.


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Gardening - Butterfly Conservation

Gardening - Butterfly Conservation | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

HOW TO ATTRACT BUTTERFLIES

 

Butterflies like warmth so choose sunny, sheltered spots when planting nectar plants.

Choose different plants to attract a wider variety of species. Place the same types of plant together in blocks.

 

Try to provide flowers right through the butterfly season. Spring flowers are vital for butterflies coming out of hibernation and Autumn flowers help butterflies build up their reserves for winter.

 

Prolong flowering by deadheading flowers, mulching with organic compost, and watering well to keep the plants healthy. Plants that are well-watered will produce far more nectar for hungry butterflies.

 

Don't use insecticides and pesticides. They kill butterflies and many pollinating insects as well as ladybirds, ground beetles and spiders.

 

Don't buy peat compost. Peat bogs are home to many special animals and plants, including the Large Heath butterfly, which is declining across Europe. There are now good alternatives available from garden centres.

 

THE BEST PLANTS FOR SUMMER NECTAR ...

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EWG's 2012 Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce™

EWG's 2012 Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce™ | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
EWG's 2012 Shoppers Guide helps you make informed choices about pesticides in your produce. Check our 'Dirty Dozen' and the 'Clean 15' to shop smarter.

 

 

Eat your fruits and vegetables! The health benefits of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables outweigh the risks of pesticide exposure. Use EWG's Shopper's Guide to Pesticides to reduce your exposures as much as possible, but eating conventionally-grown produce is far better than not eating fruits and vegetables at all.

 

The Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce will help you determine which fruits and vegetables have the most pesticide residues and are the most important to buy organic. You can lower your pesticide intake substantially by avoiding the 12 most contaminated fruits and vegetables and eating the least contaminated produce.

 

 

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Step it up

Step it up | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Turn a short stepladder into a garden focal point with a coat of bright paint, then decorate the steps with your favorite potted combinations in cans. Look for old ladders at garage and estate sales, thrift stores and flea markets.

 

Recycle flea-market finds, wooden boxes, garden accessories, kitchen bowls and more into fun container gardens. Find more ideas, here: http://goo.gl/bqMJd


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Top 10 Bizarre Plants | The Science Bulletin

Top 10 Bizarre Plants | The Science Bulletin | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

There are about 375,000 species of plants in the world today, with more being discovered on a daily basis. Plants come in all different sizes, shapes, colors, and even scents. We’ve all seen the common household plants: ferns, orchids, violets… but most of the plants on this list you’ve probably never seen in real life.

 

Even though classifying something as bizarre is pretty relative and will differ from person to person, these plants are most definitely strange in more than just one way. If you’re looking to surprise your girlfriend, these are not the types of plants to put into a pot; save them for the mother-in-law. Below are 10 odd plants that will probably make you think twice.

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Living Infrastructure: Grow Your Own Bridge!

Living Infrastructure: Grow Your Own Bridge! | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Growing your own house may seem like a new idea, but what about growing pieces of functional infrastructure? That’s exactly what the locals of Nongriat in Meghalaya, India have been doing for the past 500 years. In that time, they’ve grown bridges over one hundred feet in length and strong enough to support the weight of more than 50 people. There are even “double decker” bridges! More after the jump!


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How to make plastic from Milk

How to make plastic from Milk | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
An easy way to make plastic from milk. All you need is milk and vinegar and you can easily make plastic from it. Works really well. (Weekend occupation : make plastic with milk and vinegar.

 

This is quite an amazing little project that is really easy to do. You can make plastic with just milk and vinegar. I first ran across this process in a book about DaVinci. Evidently he had figured out a way to make this material and his recipe had been lost for a long time but recently rediscovered. At the bottom of this page I also have this tutorial in a video if you prefer to watch.

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