100 Acre Wood
3.6K views | +0 today
Follow
100 Acre Wood
Our natural habitat
Curated by David Rowing
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

The week in wildlife – in pictures

The week in wildlife – in pictures | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Hitch-hiking crabs, frozen musk ox and bats bouncing back are among the pick of this week's images from the natural world
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Vegetable and Herb Gardening at O'Hare: Organic Gardening

Vegetable and Herb Gardening at O'Hare: Organic Gardening | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

With the demand for fresh local produce on a upward spiral, so is the demand for growing space. And that, in turn, inspires innovation and invention. A good example of this forward-thinking approach is the Urban Garden at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago. On the mezzanine level of one of the busiest airports in the world, travelers will find a 928-square-foot organic oasis that features nearly 50 kinds of vegetables and herbs. The technique that makes the indoor garden possible is aeroponics, a method of cultivating plants without soil but with a nutrient-rich solution that is misted onto their roots.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Zone by zone to-do list for gardeners in February: Organic Gardening

Zone by zone to-do list for gardeners in February: Organic Gardening | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
A zone-by-zone to do list for the month of February. There's so much to do to get ready for spring.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Managing your Native Landscape to Support Pollinators

Managing your Native Landscape to Support Pollinators | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
We can all do more (or less) to manage our landscapes for pollinators. Resist the urge to clean up your landscape; instead, leave natural items such as plant stems, logs, dead trees and leaves. Pollinators need undisturbed, pesticide-free, habitat-rich, plant diverse landscapes in order to thrive. Here are some ways we can all improve pollinator habitat in our own yards:
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

The week in wildlife – in pictures

The week in wildlife – in pictures | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Flying fish, snow monkeys, koalas – and a 9,500-year-old tree, one of the oldest on Earth, are among the pick of this week's images from the natural world
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

How “insect soup” might change the face of conservation

How “insect soup” might change the face of conservation | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Much of what we know about patterns of biodiversity has come from extensive fieldwork, with expert researchers sampling and identifying species in a process that takes thousands of man-hours. But new technologies may revolutionize this process, allowing us to monitor changes in biodiversity at speeds and scales unimaginable just a decade ago. 

A new paper published in Ecology Letters offers one technological solution to the problem of monitoring biodiversity in real time - Metabarcoding. This method can provide rapid biodiversity estimates from a mashed-up cocktail of specimens nicknamed “insect soup.” It works by simply blending all the samples, then using DNA technology to pick out known species. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

People power charts tree pest spread

People power charts tree pest spread | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

A citizen science study, involving more than 3,500 people, has revealed the spread and establishment of the horse chestnut leaf-miner in the UK.

It also suggests that a native species of wasp that preys on the tiny insect will not be able to curb its impact.

 

A tree infested with the caterpillars of the non-native moth tunnel through leaves, causing them to turn autumnal brown, even in the middle of summer.

 

The study and its findings have been published in the journal PLoS One.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Judges reveal their pick of photographs showing the world at its best

Judges reveal their pick of photographs showing the world at its best | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

From baby turtles scuttling across the beach to the northern lights glowing in the Icelandic sky, these are just some of the hundreds of entries to the Living Planet photo competition. 


Both professional and amateur photographers were asked to submit images that captured life on the planet in its broadest form.

The winner of the competition, run by The Society of Nature and Wildlife Photographers, was a beautifully colourful shot of a ladybird crawling over a yellow flower.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

What to feed your garden wildlife

What to feed your garden wildlife | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Feeding garden wildlife has become a regular habit and providing a balanced menu can help keep these welcomed visitors coming back.

 

While gardens can naturally provide an abundance of fruits, seeds and insects, offering tit-bits means nature lovers can provide a nutritional boost during stressful times as well as enjoy watching wildlife from their window.

 

Although it's important to remember that the food you provide is only a supplement - and there are consequences to attracting wildlife to your garden - a few snacks could make a big difference in extreme weather or help to feed demanding young.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

British bat makes incredible journey

British bat makes incredible journey | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

The first bat to cross the sea from the UK to Europe has been recorded, according to experts.

 

The tiny Nathusius' pipistrelle was first ringed in Blagdon, near Bristol, and was discovered nearly 600km away in the Netherlands.

 

Unfortunately it had died but its identification ring could solve a migration mystery.

 

Experts suggest this could be the first evidence that the bats migrate across the North Sea.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Does aggressive weed management improve wildlife habitat?

Does aggressive weed management improve wildlife habitat? | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Most of us have weeds in our gardens and we try to eradicate them to one degree or another.

 

Aggressive weed management can create situations where weeds proliferate as fast as they are removed, soil is extremely disturbed and desired species struggle to gain a foothold.  In the battle against weeds it is easy to feel like the weeds are winning and begin to wonder whether weeds might actually be of value as wildlife habitat that should be left to grow unthwarted.  While it’s easy to be discouraged, the crux of the issue is whether or not weed control is helping improve wildlife habitat in our native gardens.  Does weed control really improve habitat or is it just an insane compulsive human activity?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Pesticides 'making bees smaller'

Pesticides 'making bees smaller' | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

The study, the first to examine the pesticides' impact across the entire lifecycle of bumblebees, tracked the growth of bee colonies over a four month period. 

 

Researchers exposed half the bees to a pyrethroid while monitoring the size of the colonies as well as weighing individual insects on micro-scales. 

They found that worker bees from colonies affected by the pesticides over a prolonged period grew less and were significantly smaller than unexposed bees. 

 

Findings from the study, funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (Nerc), appear in the Journal of Applied Ecology. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

The week in wildlife – in pictures

The week in wildlife – in pictures | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Fifteen heat-stressed baby flying foxes (bats) are lined up ready to feed at the Australia bat clinic near the Gold Coast in Queensland. Thousands of bats near Brisbane and the Gold Coast have succumbed to the extreme heat, falling out of trees and dying in heat waves in what is turning out to be Australia's hottest year so far. ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Death by pest or pesticide? Antibiotic dangers trap bees in a Catch 22

Death by pest or pesticide? Antibiotic dangers trap bees in a Catch 22 | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Antibiotics used to protect them from bacterial illnesses ravaging hives are making them die from commonly used pesticides, some of which are used to ward-off bee-killing parasites. Matthew Thompson reports.
Antibiotics widely used in the bee industry, such as oxytetracycline, are preventing bees from effectively excreting widely used pesticides.

Honey bees are trapped in a Catch 22 where antibiotics used to protect them from bacterial illnesses ravaging hives are making them die from commonly used pesticides, some of which are used to ward-off bee-killing parasites.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Trees and flooding

Trees and flooding | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Recent flooding has highlighted the importance of land use in either contributing to or mitigating flood risk. In particular the suggestion that trees might play an important role in helping reduce flood risk.

 

Reports from the Woodland Trust on water and farming and water in towns provide a review of the evidence for the role of trees. Forest Research has also undertaken a significant amount of work looking at the role of trees in delivering better water quality as well as modelling the impacts of increased tree cover on flood risk. These show that trees can make an important contribution both to mitigating flooding and improving water quality.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Is this the cutest tiger ever?

Is this the cutest tiger ever? | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
The adorable photograph was captured by Spanish photographer Pedro Jarque Krebs, 50, during a visit to the zoo at Mundopark in Seville, Spain.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Green shoots - your winter photographs

Green shoots - your winter photographs | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Striking landscape and wildlife shots are among the best reader photographs of this winter
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Ivory Coast Pilots Novel Elephant Rescue

Ivory Coast Pilots Novel Elephant Rescue | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — A conservation group says it is capturing and relocating elephants in Ivory Coast to stave off future conflicts with villagers and townspeople in the first such operation attempted in Africa's forests.

 

The International Fund for Animal Welfare this week began tranquilizing up to a dozen forest elephants outside the western town of Daloa and transporting them to Assagny National Park on the southern coast.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

In pictures: Early signs of spring

In pictures: Early signs of spring | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
A surge of records by amateur naturalists support what experts call a "long term trend" for the earlier arrival of spring in the UK.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Could bees be dying off because of a plant virus?

Could bees be dying off because of a plant virus? | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

A plant virus has been found in honeybees and could help explain their decline.


U.S. and Chinese scientists have found the tobacco ringspot pathogen, which attacks tobacco plants and soybeans, is increasingly prevalent in declining honeybee colonies.


They say it is the first evidence that honeybees exposed to infected pollen can become infected too.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Macro photographs of bees - in pictures

Macro photographs of bees - in pictures | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Sam Droege is head of the US Geological Survey Bee Inventory and Monitoring Laboratory in Maryland, and for the past seven years he and his team have been photographing bees and other insects to create online reference catalogues to help researchers identify the thousands of species across North America. Here is a selection of their work.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Worst year yet for SA rhino poaching

Worst year yet for SA rhino poaching | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

More white rhinos were illegally killed in South Africa in 2013 than in any previous year, according to government figures.

 

A total of 1,004 animals were poached, representing a 50% increase over the previous 12 months.

 

Campaigners say that a growing demand for rhino horn from markets in Vietnam and China is fuelling the killing.

 

They are concerned that illegal hunting on this scale threatens the survival of the species in the long term.

 

The White Rhino is one of the world's greatest conservation success stories. At the end of the 19th century there were just 100 alive in South Africa. Today there are around 20,000 according to experts.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Gardening with your children: Organic Gardening

Gardening with your children: Organic Gardening | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
Here are some great ideas to help your kids turn digging in the dirt into a lifetime of love and respect for nature. The garden necessarily teaches patience and caring.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

In pictures: Jumping red-eyed tree frogs of Costa Rica by Nicolas Reusens - Telegraph

In pictures: Jumping red-eyed tree frogs of Costa Rica by Nicolas Reusens - Telegraph | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

In pictures: Red-eyed tree frogs of Costa Rica by Nicolas Reusens.  Agalychnis callidryas is native to the Neotropical rain forests of Central America and can leap up to a metre and a half.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Will We all Die if Honey Bees Disappear (in the U.S.)?

Will We all Die if Honey Bees Disappear (in the U.S.)? | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

If all honey bees disappeared, it would be catastrophic for agriculture, as we know it, and we would certainly suffer grievously, but we would survive. Nevertheless, over time, other pollinators could, and would, take over all the tasks that the Jack-of-all-trades performs today. This would require profound changes in agriculture to meet these pollinators’ needs such as nesting habitat, diversity of crops, protection from pesticides and more. Fortunately, several groups of pollination experts are already exploring this issue and coming with alternatives.

more...
No comment yet.