100 Acre Wood
Follow
Find tag "wildlife"
3.5K views | +0 today
100 Acre Wood
Our natural habitat
Curated by David Rowing
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Educating Kids About Wildlife - Wildlife Gardener

Educating Kids About Wildlife - Wildlife Gardener | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
How introducing children to gardening helps to educate them about the environment and those that live within it.

 

Getting kids involved in wildlife gardening has many educational benefits. They’ll get to understand issues of key importance such as global warming and climate change which will have a major impact upon their future and will teach them other useful transferable skills which they can use in other areas throughout both their childhood and later in life.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Rowing from The Glory of the Garden
Scoop.it!

How To Encourage Wildlife into Your Garden | Gardeners Tips

How To Encourage Wildlife into Your Garden | Gardeners Tips | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

Some useful tips to encourage birds, insects, frogs and small mammals into your garden.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Encouraging Wildlife in Your Hedges - Wildlife Gardener

Encouraging Wildlife in Your Hedges - Wildlife Gardener | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it
How even a small hedge of the right make up can encourage wildlife to set up in your garden. How it provides food, shelter and a place to avoid predators for insects, birds and small mammals.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Create a Wildlife Pond - Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust

Create a Wildlife Pond - Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust | 100 Acre Wood | Scoop.it

If space is tight, many of the benefits of a garden pond can be achieved simply by letting a large water-tight container – such as an old sink, half-barrel or bathtub – fill with rain, then varying its depth by putting in plants, planters, rocks and pebbles.

In larger gardens, look for a site which catches the sun for some – but not all - of the day, as some of the most fascinating pond creatures need both warmth and shade to prosper.

If possible, stay away from leaf-shedding trees or bushes, to save time on pond maintenance.

Size is a matter of taste and space. While ponds with a surface area of at least four square metres are better for wildlife even smaller ponds can look just as attractive and provide equally welcome rest and refreshment sites for many creatures.

more...
No comment yet.